(Posted January 16, 2017)

""Intergalactic Nemesis Book Two: Robot Planet Rising" will be performed at 7:30 p.m., Saturday, Jan. 28, in the Halbritter Center for the Performing Arts.
Courtesy Intergalactic Nemesis
""Intergalactic Nemesis Book Two: Robot Planet Rising" will be performed at 7:30 p.m., Saturday, Jan. 28, in the Halbritter Center for the Performing Arts.
Courtesy Intergalactic Nemesis

HUNTINGDON, Pa. -- In 2014, Juniata College was invaded by interplanetary invaders. Well, actually it was a bunch of actors dramatizing the graphic novel “The Intergalactic Nemesis: Target Earth.” They’re back in Rosenberger Auditorium with the sequel “Intergalactic Nemesis Book Two: Robot Planet Rising” at 7:30 p.m., Saturday, Jan. 28, in the Halbritter Center for the Performing Arts.

            For tickets and information about the Juniata College Presents series, please call 814-641-JTIX (5849). General admission tickets for single performances are $20, except where otherwise noted. Single-show tickets for seniors over age 65 and children age 18 and under are $12. Juniata College students are admitted free with a student ID.

            “The Intergalactic Nemesis” is a mishmash of performing styles, combining pulp science fiction, radio drama, postmodern graphic novels and improvisational acting, bringing together a hilarious production.

            The plot of the first part of the trilogy focused on Molly Sloan, a reporter teamed with research assistant, Timmy Mendez, and a somewhat mysterious librarian named Ben Wilcott. The trio followed clues as they tried to head off an invasion of sludge-monsters from the Planet Zygon.

“Intergalactic Nemesis: Robot Planet Rising” rejoins Molly and Timmy on Robonovia, the robot planet. When the space commander El-Bee-Dee-Oh goes missing, the two “detectives” must track him down. Unfortunately Molly’s former fiancé appears, with an assistant named Natasha who may be a Russian spy. Suddenly Molly and Timmy discover a plot that may destroy Robonovia and possibly Earth.

"It's an adventure story featuring robots, aliens, time travel and magical powers. But its special effects take place exclusively in the audience's mind, created through an alchemy of old media and imagination."

Robyn Ross, New York Times.

            The history of “Intergalactic Nemesis” started as a radio play and was subsequently adapted into a stage play by Jason Neulander. Neulander then adapted the project into multimedia and commissioned a seven-issue comic book series of the same name.

            The cast of three actors stand behind 1930s-era radio microphones at center stage, playing over two dozen separate characters as more than 1,000 images drawn in the style of classic science fiction comic books illustrate the plot points of the story.

            In addition, the production is scored by an onstage musician, while the audience is treated to hundreds of sound effects created live, using everyday objects, by a talented and even busier Foley artist. In films and television, sound effects are provided by a Foley Artist, named for the man who first originated sound effects for sound films in 1927.

“It’s an adventure story featuring robots, aliens, time travel and magical powers. But its special effects take place exclusively in the audience’s mind, created through an alchemy of old media and imagination,” says Robyn Ross, a reporter for the New York Times.

Contact Gabe Welsch at welschg@juniata.edu or (814) 641-3131 for more information.