Biology

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Courses

BI-105   Biological Diversity and Ecology (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) The first of two introductory courses for students pursuing a program of emphasis in biology or in related areas such as biochemistry or environmental science. Topics covered include Mendelian genetics, evolution, ecology and the diversity of life.

BI-106   Functions of Cells and Organisms (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) The second course in the introductory biology series. This course is divided into two half semester modules: cell and molecular biology and the physiology and systems of plants and animals. Prerequisites: BI105 and CH105.

BI-121   Biology Lab I (Fall; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; N,QS) An introduction to laboratory science. The course consists of two modules, covering basic DNA analysis techniques and Ecology. Emphasis will be placed in each module on experimental design, development of rigorous laboratory and field skills, and use of technology. Note: A special fee is assessed. Corequisite: BI105.

BI-122   Biology Lab II (Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; N,QS) An introduction to laboratory science. The course consists of two modules: 1) protein isolation and separation and 2) Ecology. Emphasis will be placed in each module on experimental design, development of laboratory skills. Note: A special fee is assessed. Prerequisites: BI105 and BI121.

BI-142   Sensory Biology (Spring; Even Years; 3.00 Credits; N) The Senses will cover basic themes in biology using different sensory modalities as model systems. The course will deal with the traditional five senses as well as ways in which other animals perceive the world. The Senses will outline the vital role sensory processing plays in evolution, alterations in cellular activity and gene expression, memory and behavior. This course is not recommended for students whose programs of emphasis are in the natural sciences. There are no prerequisites for this course.

BI-189   Freshman Seminar (Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; N,CW) The Freshman Biology Seminar will provide students with a small biology class in their first year and provide faculty advisors with an opportunity to interact with their freshman advisees on a weekly basis and gauge progress in the program. Students will read and discuss the philosophical and quantative underpinnings of scientific inquiry and will apply writing skills acquired in their first semester of College Writing Seminar to communicating scientific ideas. Prerequisites: Biology POE. This course is required for all students intending to graduate with a POE in Biology.

BI-190   Human Biology (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) A non-majors approach to the biology of humans. The course covers the basic chemistry and biology of the human body, as well as how humans fit into the environment. Emphasis will be on applying information to current topics at the individual and societal levels. This course covers the biology requirement for the Social Work POE and is one of the courses included in the Genomics Certificate.

BI-199   BI Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows department to offer topics not normally taught. Prerequisites and Corequisites vary by title.

BI-199A   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 3.00-4.00 Credits) Allows departments to offer subjects not normally taught. Prerequisites and fees vary by topic.

BI-199B   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 3.00-4.00 Credits) Allows departments to offer subjects not normally taught. Prerequisites and fees vary by topic.

BI-199C   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 3.00-4.00 Credits) Allows departments to offer subjects not normally taught. Prerequisites and fees vary by topic.

BI-207   Dynamics Biological Processes (Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N) This course builds on the basic concepts covered in BI105 and BI106, with emphasis on signaling and energy balance and requirements of cells and biological systems. The course has both a classroom and a laboratory component. Required for students with a biology POE. Prerequisites: BI106 and CH106 and CH232.

BI-231   Microbiology I (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) Focuses on the structure, function, growth, genetics and ecology of viral, bacterial, and fungal microorganisms. Basic concepts are emphasized and topics important to the quality of human life are examined. Corequisite: BI 232. Prerequisite: BI106 and CH106.

BI-232   Microbiology Laboratory I (Fall; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; N) Presents procedures and experiments which demonstrate basic micro-biological concepts and techniques. Illustrates and augments the content of the lecture. Note: A special fee is assessed. Corequisite: BI231.

BI-268   Intro. to Human Anatomy (Summer; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N) A study of the structural and functional anatomy of the human body. This course is designed for both non-biology majors and biology majors with an interest in the health professions. At the end of the course you will be able to identify and describe the major anatomical features and function of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems.

BI-289   Frontiers of Biology (Fall; Yearly; 1.00 Credit) Seminar series, required in all Biology POE's in the Sophomore year, consisting of research seminars given by invited speakers and members of the department, both faculty and students. Descriptions of independent research, internship and study abroad opportunities as well as reports by students and faculty on experiences in these programs will be presented. Prerequisite: BI189.

BI-290   Nutrition (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) This course covers basic principles and facts about nutrition, explores the role of nutrition in human health, and considers a range of societal and political issues surrounding food and nutrition in the U.S. and abroad. Prerequisites: So, Jr, or Sr. standing. Preference is given to students for whom Nutrition is a prerequisite for profession school. Prerequisites: Sophomore, Junior, or Senior standing.

BI-299   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows the Biology department to offer topics not on the regular schedule. Prerequisites will vary based on topic.

BI-299A   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 3.00-4.00 Credits) Allows departments to offer subjects not normally taught. Prerequisites and fees vary by topic.

BI-299B   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 3.00-4.00 Credits) Allows departments to offer subjects not normally taught. Prerequisites and fees vary by topic.

BI-299C   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 3.00-4.00 Credits) Allows departments to offer subjects not normally taught. Prerequisites and fees vary by topic.

BI-300   General Ecology (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) Examines the interactions of living organisms with their physical, chemical and biotic environments. Special attention is given to the environmental, biological and historical factors affecting the distribution, abundance, adaptation, and diversity of species in natural communities. This course deals with " ecological principles " , and as such complements the Introduction to Environmental Science course, which deals with environmental issues. Prerequisites: BI105 and BI121 or permission of the instructor. Corequisite: BI301.

BI-301   General Ecology Lab (Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; N) Students work together as research teams to carry out original investigations on the ecology of local species and natural communities. Emphasis on ecological research design, data collection and analysis, and oral and written presentation of results. Frequent field trips are included. Note: a special lab fee is assessed and one field trip may require an additional fee. Corequisite: BI300.

BI-301CW   General Ecology Lab (Spring; Yearly; 2.00 Credits; N,CW) Students work together as research teams to carry out original investigations on the ecology of local species and natural communities. Emphasis on ecological research design, data collection and analysis, and oral and written presentation of results. Frequent field trips are included. Note: a special fee is assessed and one optional field trip requires an additional fee. This section of general ecology lab contains added emphasis on writing to fulfill college writing requirements. Frequent field trips are included. Note: a special lab fee is assessed and one field trip may require an additional fee. Corequisite: BI300.

BI-305   Biostatistics (Fall; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N,QS) This course deals centrally with quantitative and statistical methodology in the biological sciences. It includes experimental design and the conventions of generating, analyzing, interpreting and presenting biological data. Counts as a math course for graduate and professional school requirements. Prerequisites: BI106 or ESS100.

BI-305CW   Biostatistics (Fall; Yearly; 5.00 Credits; N,QS,CW) This course deals centrally with quantitative and statistical methodology in the biological sciences. It includes experimental design and the conventions of generating, analyzing, interpreting and presenting biological data. Counts as a math course for graduate and professional school requirements. This writing intensive section requires the writing of an individual research report and one additional hour of class time to discuss writing in biology. Prerequisites: BI106 or ESS100.

BI-307   Molecular Techniques (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N,CW) A laboratory course designed to cover standard molecular biology and biochemistry techniques. Skills will be learned while pursuing some aspect of current faculty research. Intended as an introduction to the research experience in the study of nucleic acids and proteins. Strongly recommended for student considering summer internships and/or senior research in these areas. Prerequisite or corequisite: BI207 and permission of the instructor.

BI-310   Physiology (Fall; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N) A combined laboratory and lecture course which examines the function of cells, tissues, organs, and systems. Physical, Mathematical, chemical, and anatomical concepts are integrated to gain a comprehensive appreciation of the dynamics of living organisms. Students are introduced to the use of physiological instrumentation, experimental design, collection and statistical analysis of data, and preparation of scientific manuscripts. Laboratory experiments amplify and complement the lectures. Prerequisites: BI207 or permission and Junior or Senior standing.

BI-310CW   Physiology (Fall; Yearly; 5.00 Credits; N,CW) A combined laboratory and lecture course which examines the function of cells, tissues, organs, and systems. Physical, Mathematical, chemical, and anatomical concepts are integrated to gain a comprehensive appreciation of the dynamics of living organisms. Students are introduced to the use of physiological instrumentation, experimental design, collection and statistical analysis of data, and preparation of scientific manuscripts. Laboratory experiments amplify and complement the lectures. In addition, students taking this Writing version of BI310 receive additional instruction regarding writing in Biology and produce a well-researched paper on a topic in Physiology.

BI-316   Biochemistry & Molecular Biology II (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) A comprehensive approach to the study of cells, with emphasis on molecular techniques and understanding the primary literature. Analysis of the cell at the molecular level emphasizes a unity in the principles by which cells function. Prerequisites: BI207 and CH301.

BI-318   Developmental Biology (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) This course offers comprehensive investigation of the concepts and mechanisms of development, including ganetogenesis, fertilization, pattern formation and organogenesis. The course examines classical and molecular approaches examining problems of development. Students are expected to present research from current literature in the field. Prerequisites: BI207.

BI-318CW   Developmental Biology (Fall; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N,CW) This course offers comprehensive investigation of the concepts and mechanisms of development, including ganetogenesis, fertilization, pattern formation and organogenesis. The course examines classical and molecular approaches examining problems of development. Students are expected to present research from current literature in the field. This course is the CW version of BI318. In addition to the topic of Developmental Biology, students will receive instruction related to writing in the biological sciences and will be required to produce a well-researched paper on a topic in developmental biology. Prerequisites: BI207.

BI-321   Ecological Genetics (Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; N,QS) Ecological genetics is concerned with the genetics of ecologically and evolutionarily important traits, that is, traits related to fitness such as survival, growth, and reproduction. It is the study of the process of phenotypic evolution occurring in present-day natural populations. Basic and advanced concepts in population and quantitative genetics are covered, including measuring selection on phenotypic characters, with a focus on methods applicable to field studies of ecologically important traits. Mathematical and conceptual material are fully integrated and explained. Application to conservation, spread of invasive species, evolution of pesticide, herbicide, and antibiotic resistance, and environmental effects of genetically modified organisms used in agriculture will be covered. Lab period will be devoted to problem solving, discussion group, experimental manipulation and simulation studies, and independent student research projects. Prerequisites: BI105 and BI106 and BI305 or MA220.

BI-323   Mammalogy (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; N) Examines the comparative biology of living mammals, including taxonomy, evolution, biogeography, ecology, morphology, physiology and behavior. Special attention is given to conservation issues, the relevance of mammals in modern biological research, and field techniques for studying mammals. Prerequisites: BI105 or permission of the instructor.

BI-324   Ornithology (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) This course provides a comprehensive survey of the comparative biology, ecology, and behavior of birds with a special focus on issues pertaining to conservation and management. Laboratory activities focus on field identification of birds and research and monitoring techniques. Several field trips are possible with one possible 3 day trip to Assatteague Island. Prerequisite: BI105.

BI-325   Plant Ecology (Fall; Yearly; 2.00 Credits; N) Primarily an ecology course, but also included is a significant amount of plant identification/classification and plant epochology. The ecology portion will cover the whole spectrum of this fast-growing field; from communities and ecosystems to theory and adaptation. Corequisite: BI326. Prerequisites: BI105 and Junior or Senior standing.

BI-326   Plant Ecology Lab (Variable; Yearly; 2.00 Credits; N) The first 10 weeks are devoted to laboratory work on the identification of the local entophyte flora. Students are required to make a personal collection representing a minimum of 8 families and are expected to become proficient in using a scientific manual. During the 5th and 6th week there is a mandatory all day field trip to collect forest data. An extensive paper on forest succession will be due by semester's end. Note: A special fee is assessed. Corequisite: BI325.

BI-327   Botany (Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N) This course will provide an in-depth examination of the biology of plants. In lecture and lab we will examine plant reproduction and development, morphology and physiology, evolution and biodiversity, and ecology and conservation. Particular attention will be paid to the aspects of plant biology that are unique to this branch of life and/or are of critical importance to human or other biotic interactions (e.g. photosynthesis, pollination, agriculture, etc.). Prerequisites: BI105. Note: A special course fee is applied.

BI-328   Limnology (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) An ecology/environmental science course covering inland aquatic environments (lakes and streams). A balanced study of both physical-chemical and biological aspects, it is an appropriate upper level addition to a variety of POE's in natural sciences. BI 329 is optional. Prerequisites: POEs in the natural sciences junior/senior standing.Prerequisites: ESS100 and BI105 and BI121.

BI-331   Microbiology II (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) Focuses on the structure, function, growth, genetics and ecology of viral, bacterial, and fungal microorganisms. Basic concepts are emphasized and topics important to the quality of human life are examined. Corequisite: BI332. Prerequisites: BI207 and Jr. or Sr. standing.

BI-331CW   Microbiology II (Fall; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N,CW) Focuses on the structure, function, growth, genetics and ecology of viral, bacterial, and fungal microorganisms. Basic concepts are emphasized and topics important to the quality of human life are examined. Corequisite: BI332. Prerequisites: BI207 and Jr. or Sr. standing.

BI-332   Microbiology Laboratory (Fall; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; N) Presents procedures and experiments which demonstrate basic micro-biological concepts and techniques. Illustrates and augments the content of the lecture. Note: A special fee is assessed. Corequisite: BI331.

BI-334   Immunology (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; N) Covers the properties of antigens, antibodies and complement, humeral and cell-mediated immunological systems, antigen-anti body interactions and hypersensitivity reactions. Prerequisites: BI207 and Junior or Senior standing or permission of the instructor.

BI-334CW   Immunology (Variable; Variable; 4.00 Credits; N,CW) Covers the properties of antigens, antibodies and complement, humeral and cell-mediated immunological systems, antigen-anti body interactions and hypersensitivity reactions. This Immunology section contains additional emphasis on successful writing in the biological sciences. Prerequisites: BI207 and Junior or Senior standing or permission of the instructor.

BI-337   Comparative & Evolutionary Psych (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; CS,N,S) (see PY 337)

BI-339   Organic Evolution (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) Presents the theory and facts of organic revolution through a review of modern and historical research on the subject. Major topics include population genetics, adaptations, evolutionary ecology, systematics, the fossil record, molecular evolution, ontogeny and phylogeny, macroevolution, co-evolution, human evolution, and sociobiology. Prerequisite: BI207 or BI300.

BI-339CW   Organic Evolution (Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N,CW) Presents the theory and facts of organic revolution through a review of modern and historical research on the subject. Major topics include population genetics, adaptations, evolutionary ecology, systematics, the fossil record, molecular evolution, ontogeny and phylogeny, macroevolution, co-evolution, human evolution, and sociobiology. This course is the CW version of BI339. In addition to the topic of Evolution, students will receive instruction related to writing in the biological sciences and will be required to produce a well-researched paper on a topic in evolution. Prerequisites: BI207 or BI300 or permission of instructor.

BI-350   Invertebrate Zoology (Fall; Odd Years; 2.00 Credits; N) Focuses on the organizational plan, behavioral and ecological adaptation, diversity and economic importance of representative members of the major invertebrate phyla. Corequisite: BI351. Prerequisite: BI105 and BI121.

BI-351   Invertebrate Zoology Lab (Fall; Odd Years; 2.00 Credits; N) Illustrates and augments the content and concepts of the lecture through direct observation and/or dissection of selected representative organisms. Corequisite: BI350.

BI-360   Vertebrate Zoology (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) Focuses on the vertebrate animals of the Eastern United States. Collection, taxonomic identification and natural history are emphasized. Suggested corequisites: BI361. Prerequisites: BI105 and Ecology/Biology related POE.

BI-361   Vertebrate Zoology Lab (Fall; Yearly; 2.00 Credits; N) Frequent field trips, for observation and specimen collection are followed by exercises in identification, specimen preparation, and museum techniques to illustrate and augment the concepts and content of the lecture. Note: A special fee is assessed and one optional field trip requires an additional fee. Corequisite: BI360.

BI-367   Comparative Anatomy (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) A study of the structural organization of the chordate animal. Each of the major organ systems is reviewed with attention to general pattern, comparative details in representative vertebrate groups, development, and structure-dependent function. Corequisite: BI368. Prerequisite: BI106 and BI122.

BI-368   Comp Anatomy Laboratory (Fall; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; N) Provides additional content to further illustrates the lecture. Emphasis is placed upon the dissection of selected representative vertebrates. Note: A special fee is assessed. Corequisite: BI367.

BI-370   Herpetology (Summer; Variable; 3.00 Credits; N) This course presents the biology of amphibians and reptiles from an evolutionary, anatomical and ecological perspective. Phylogenetic diversity of modern taxa will be presented, focusing on North American groups. Instruction will be in the form of lectures, discussions, laboratory activities and field trips to observe local herpetological species. Prerequisites: BI113. Note: A special course fee will be applied.

BI-380   Biology Research Methods (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N,CW) Offered in multiple sections by faculty members in the Biology department for students interested in learning to conduct meaningful and responsible research. Students enroll in a section aligned with their research interest to generate novel data, while mastering the important components of research common to each of the diverse areas of Biology. Prerequisites: BI105, BI122, BI189, sophomore standing, permission.

BI-389   Biology Research Seminar (Fall; Yearly; 1.00 Credit) Lectures, discussions and student exercises covering such topics as ethics in research, writing effective research proposals and the effective written and oral communication of research results. Professional research and educational societies, government and private funding of research in the United States and other countries and career opportunities will also be discussed. Prerequisites: BI289. Corequisites: BI489. Graded S (satisfactory) or U (unsatisfactory).

BI-399   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Offered at the discretion of the department to qualified students. Topic titles may vary from semester to semester and more than one may be offered per semester. Note: Students may take each ST: course for credit and a special fee is assessed. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor, or as indicated.

BI-399A   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows departments to offer topics not normally taught. Prerequisites, corequisites and fees vary by title.

BI-399B   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 3.00-4.00 Credits) Allows departments to offer subjects not normally taught. Prerequisites and fees vary by topic.

BI-399C   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 3.00-4.00 Credits) Allows departments to offer subjects not normally taught. Prerequisites and fees vary by topic.

BI-399D   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 3.00-4.00 Credits) Allows departments to offer subjects not normally taught. Prerequisites and fees vary by topic.

BI-399E   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 3.00-4.00 Credits) Allows departments to offer subjects not normally taught. Prerequisites and fees vary by topic.

BI-417   Reproductive Biology (Fall; Even Years; 3.00 Credits; N) This course examines reproductive biology by integrating aspects of development, anatomy, cell biology, and hormone physiology with the behavior and ecology of vertebrates. Prerequisites: BI06.

BI-417CW   Reproductive Biology (Fall; Even Years; 4.00 Credits; N,CW) This course examines reproductive biology by integrating aspects of development, anatomy, cell biology, and hormone physiology with the behavior and ecology of vertebrates. Prerequisites: BI06.

BI-432   Environmental Toxicology (Fall; Odd Years; 3.00 Credits; N) Broadly integrative in nature, this class examines the fate and actions of xenobiotic compounds in environmental systems and focuses on the potential for deleterious consequences in wildlife species and humans. Examines aspects of chemistry, cell biology and ecology in considering environmental contamination. Instruction includes lectures and student presentations/writing exercises. Prerequisites: BI-105 and one semester of chemistry or permission of the instructor.

BI-432CW   Environmental Toxicology (Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N,CW) Broadly integrative in nature, this class examines the fate and actions of xenobiotic compounds in environmental systems and focuses on the potential for deleterious consequences in wildlife species and humans. Examines aspects of chemistry, cell biology and ecology in considering environmental contamination. Instruction includes lectures and student presentations/writing exercises. Prerequisites: BI106 or CH106 or permission of the instructor.

BI-450   Neurobiology (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) Neurobiology is a lecture course that addresses concepts ranging from the molecular biology of ion channels to signal integration and behavior. This course is experimentally based and will focus on the biophysics, chemistry, and mechanisms of signal production and integration in the nervous system. Particular attention will be paid to sensory systems and memory consolidation. In addition to lecture exams, students will gain valuable experience in scientific writing through the preparation of a review paper on a neurobiological topic of their choosing. Prerequisites: BI207 or PY238 or permission.

BI-450CW   Neurobiology (Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N,CW) Neurobiology (W) is a lecture course that addresses concepts ranging from the molecular biology of ion channels to signal integration and behavior combined with a supplemental series of lectures to develop the students writing skills in Biology. This course is experimentally based and will focus on the biophysics, chemistry, and mechanisms of signal production and integration in the nervous system. Particular attention will be paid to sensory systems and memory consolidation. In addition to lecture exams, students will gain valuable experience in scientific writing through the preparation of a review paper on a neurobiological topic of their choosing. Prerequisites: BI207 or PY238.

BI-461   The Art & Science of Brewing (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) This is a synoptic study of brewing, integrating the science, technology and history while considering all of the many steps in the brewing process including, barley and malting, yeast biology, brewing herbs mashing, conditioning and beer styles. Class meetings consist of 2, 50 minute lectures and 1, 4 hour laboratory each week. Enrollment is limited and students are expected to request a reservation well in advance by contacting the instructor. Students must have passed their 21st birthday prior to attending the first class meeting. Note: A special fee is assessed. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Students will be expected to have completed one semester each of biology and chemistry and two semesters of laboratory work in the natural sciences.

BI-475   Microscopy (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; N) Provides experience in the basics of various forms of light and electron microscopy. Tissue preparation, sectioning and staining, instrument operation, image acquisition, processing and data management are included. Confocal fluorescence and contrast enhancement techniques used in light microscopy of living cells are emphasized. The format is tutorial and each student is required to submit an electronic portfolio of images. Note: A special fee is assessed. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

BI-489   Biology Research (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00-6.00 Credits; N) Individual research projects directed by faculty members based on proposals submitted in BI 389, Biology Research Seminar. Attendance at a departmental journal club is expected. Presentation at a professional meeting is encouraged. May be repeated for up to 15 credits. Prerequisite: BI389 and permission of the instructor.

BI-490   Biology Internship (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 2.00-9.00 Credits; N) Note: May be repeated up to a total of 9 hours of credit. Corequisite: BI 495. Prerequisite: permission and Jr. or Sr. standing.

BI-495   Internship Seminar (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 2.00-6.00 Credits; N) Requires students to reflect on the experience and/or pursue relevant research. Corequisite: BI 490. Prerequisite: Permission

BI-496   Bio.Instr.Workshop (Summer; Irregular/On Demand; 3.00 Credits) This course will introduce teachers to the practical use and underlying theory behind modern biological instrumentation and technology. The subject matter will include some or all of the following; electrophoresis, microscopy, histology, physiology, human evolution, genetics, enzymology, luminology, etc.

BI-497   Bio. Instr/Bio. Teachers (Summer; Irregular/On Demand; 3.00 Credits; N) Teaching high school and middle school teachers how to use laptop computers with Vernier computer probes in activities from biology and chemistry with may include Boyle's Law, freezing point, pH titration, colorimetry, molar volume of a gas, foot pressure, enzyme activity, cell volume relationships, conductivity, and respiration.

BI-498   Bio. Instr/Bio. Teachers (Summer; Irregular/On Demand; 3.00 Credits; N) This course will introduce teachers to the practical use and underlying theory behind modern biology instrumentation and technology. The Subject matter will include electrophoresis microscopy, histology, human physiology, microbiology, human evolution, genetics, enzymology, limnology, etc.

BI-499   Senior Thesis (Either Semester; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N,CW) This course is the culmination of an individual research project initiated in BI 489. Students will complete their projects by writing a paper describing their research. These papers will be of significant length and contain full documentation of the student's original research. The thesis will be presented orally to faculty and students at the yearly campus wide Juniata Student Research Symposium. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

BI-499   Adv Bi Inst/Bi Tchrs (Summer; Irregular/On Demand; 3.00 Credits) The purpose of this course is to continue the study of instrumentation beyond the introductory levels of BI498. The teachers will develop advanced techniques for teaching the practical use and underlying theory behind modern biological instrumentation and technology. The subject matter will include: Electrophoresis, Microscopy, Histology, Human Evolution, Genetics, Enzymology, Limnology, etc. Prerequisites: BI498.

BI-TUT   Biology Teaching Assistant (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits)