Faculty Bio

Mark Pearson

von Liebig Post Doctoral Fellow in Optical Physics

Office Location: Brumbaugh Academic Center P213
Phone Number: (814)641- 3722

Dr Mark Pearson came to Juniata in 2003 as an Optical Physics Postdoctoral Fellow. He is a native of Birmingham, England where, before starting his academic career, he worked from 1985 to 1989 as a systems manager at Cooper MacDonald and Partner, a structural engineering company. He then went to London to earn a bachelor?s degree in Physics at the Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine in 1992. At the same establishment, he earned a doctoral degree in biophysics, investigating the mechanisms of red blood cell aggregation and methods for its quantification, in 1996.

Following this he worked as a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Bioengineering, Penn State University, studying the effects of red cell aggregation in the circulation, from 1996 to 2001.

Dr Pearson's research interests includes studying how red blood cells stick together and the effects of this in the circulation, red cell-white cell interactions and non-invasive biological imaging systems. His research has been published in a number of journals, including American Journal of Physiology, Microcirculation, Biorheology, Clinical Hemorheology and Blood Coagulation and Fibrinolysis.

Dr Pearson is a member of the Optical Society of America, the Council for Undergraduate Research and is an Associate of the Royal College of Science.
Mark Pearson comes to Juniata in 2003 as an Optical Physics Postdoctoral Fellow. Pearson, a native of England, earned a bachelor?sDr Mark Pearson came to Juniata in 2003 as an Optical Physics Postdoctoral Fellow. He is a native of Birmingham, England where, before starting his academic career, he worked from 1985 to 1989 as a systems manager at Cooper MacDonald and Partner, a structural engineering company. He then went to London to earn a bachelor?s degree in Physics at the Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine in 1992. At the same establishment, he earned a doctoral degree in biophysics, investigating the mechanisms of red blood cell aggregation and methods for its quantification, in 1996.

Following this he worked as a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Bioengineering, Penn State University, studying the effects of red cell aggregation in the circulation, from 1996 to 2001.

Dr Pearson's research interests includes studying how red blood cells stick together and the effects of this in the circulation, red cell-white cell interactions and non-invasive biological imaging systems. His research has been published in a number of journals, including American Journal of Physiology, Microcirculation, Biorheology, Clinical Hemorheology and Blood Coagulation and Fibrinolysis.

Dr Pearson is a member of the Optical Society of America, the Council for Undergraduate Research and is an Associate of the Royal College of Science.
degree in physics from the Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine in London in 1992. He earned a doctoral degree in biophysics in 1996 at St. Mary's Hospital Medical School, part of the Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine.

He worked as a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Bioengineering, Penn State University from 1996 to 2001. Before starting his academic career, Pearson worked from 1985 to 1989 as a systems manager at Cooper MacDonald and Partner, a structural engineering company in Birmingham, England.

His research has been published in a number of journals, including, Clinical Hemorheology, Blood Coagulation and Fibrinolysis, Biorheology and Microcirculation.

Pearson is a member of the Biomedical Engineering Society, the Institute of Physics and is an Associate of the Royal College of Science.

Pearson's research focuses on studying how red blood cells stick together, a phenomenon called Rouleaux formation.