Catalog 2014-15

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Cultural Analysis(CA)

Faculty:

Interim Provost Kathryn Westcott (Coordinator of General Education) - ext. 3123

Interdisciplinary Colloquia (IC) and (CA)

Students will need to choose one course from a listing of courses known as Interdisciplinary Colloquia (IC) and one course from a listing known as Cultural Analysis (CA).  In the IC course, faculty from different disciplines work with students in a team-taught and interdisciplinary setting to tackle a significant topic while developing writing, discussion, close reading, and critical thinking skills.   The CA courses focus on some aspect of culture or offer an introduction to a culture by using both scholarly and primary texts from that culture and are also committed to developing writing skills. 

The IC and CA courses require sophomore standing and above and can be taken  in any order or  even at the same time.  The Interdisciplinary Colloquium and Cultural Analysis requirement will be waived for students who successfully complete a world language course beyond the 210 level in the target language and a semester or more of study abroad in the  target language and culture.  Please note that the credits (7  to 8 credits) need to be earned elsewhere to earn the needed 120 for graduation.

PLEASE NOTE:

  To find Interdisciplinary Colloquia courses and Cultural Analysis that are offered in the home department, please use CLASS SCHEDULES and look under SKILLS.

Interdisciplinary Colloquia Courses:

IC-201   Culture and Commerce (Fall; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; IC) Culture and Commerce explores the intersection of economics and culture both as areas of academic inquiry and as societal systems. The fundamental questions this interdisciplinary course addresses are 1)Does a market economy encourage the creation of the fine and performing arts, and 2) Do economic forces of supply and demand help or harm these creative endeavors? Prerequisites: EN110.

IC-202   Shaping the American Mind (Fall; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; IC) Beginning in the seventeenth century scientific revolution, continuing with a look at the enlightenment thinkers that brought notions of liberty, economics and pluralism to the United States, this course uses the history of ideas to ask why we Americans are and what ideas helped make us this way. Prerequisites: EN110.

IC-203   Genomics, Ethics & Society (Fall; Variable; 4.00 Credits; IC) The purpose of this course will be to gain an understanding of the science behind the genome project and develop an understanding how ethical norms are established and challenged. Students will discuss and debate the potential implications of this new technology for them as individuals and for society in general. Prerequisites: EN 110.

IC-204   Evolution and American Culture (Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; IC) The Darwinian Revolution, based on Darwinian evolutionary theory, is one of the greatest and most profound human achievements. But today, more than 150 years after the publication of Darwin's Origin of Species, we still have not come to terms with its mind-boggling implications and not fully explored its awesome explanatory power in transforming our thinking of many big issues (e.g. sex and marriage, family, gender, race, morality, human nature, religion, meaning of life, etc.). This course will accomplish something far more interesting than to debate or argue for the truth of evolution theory or how to accommodate our traditional religious beliefs to the framework of evolution and science. To accomplish our objective, we will first trace the development of Darwinian evolutionary theory and reconstruct the Darwinian paradigm. We will then study and explain the nature ofthe conservative religious and other forms of cultural reactions to Darwinian theory in American culture. And finally, we will investigate the many culturally significant and profound implications of the Darwinian Revolution in our society. Prerequisites: EN-110 or EN109 or EN199B.

IC-205   Modern Knowledge & the Self (Fall; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; IC) Who are we? In what kind of world do we live? What can we know about the world and ourselves and how? This course examines how the modern has changed our answers to these and other questions. Particular attention will be paid to modern and post-modern understandings of scientific and narrative knowledge as well as cultural transformations in the comprehension of the self. Materials include films, novels, essays, and the visual arts. Prerequisites: EN110.

IC-206   Remote Field Course Sem. (YYearly; 2.00 Credits; CW) This course introduces students to the biology, geology, and history of the Southwestern desert region. It explores how humans have historically interacted in this arid environment and how modern culture has placed environmental burdens on the region's resources. Lectures and discussions will build on the interdisciplinary nature of the course content. The course culminates in a 17 day trip, May 19-June 4, 2014, to the deserts of Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico and Utah. Note: A field trip fee is applied to this course. The total fee is $1,750.00. Half is charged in the spring with IC 206. The other half is charged when students register for IC207, in the summer. Completion of IC206 and IC207 fulfills the IC requirement. You will not receive IC credit unless you complete both IC206 and IC207. Prerequisites: EN110. Corequisite: IC207.

IC-207   Remote Field Course (YYearly; 2.00 Credits; IC,CW) This course builds on the introduction to the Southwest the students began in IC206, by taking them to the field to explore the biology, geology, anthropology, and history of the Southwest desert region from a variety of perspectives. Students explore how humans have historically interacted in this arid environment and how modern culture has placed environmental burdens on the region's resources. This 2 credit course culminates the IC experience in a 17 day field trip to the deserts of Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico and Utah from 5/19 till 6/4/13. Prerequisites: EN110. There is a fee applied to this course. One half of the total fee is charged with IC206 in the spring. The second half is charged when students register for IC207 in the summer along with any module fees. Completion of IC206 and IC207 fulfills the IC requirement. You will not receive IC credit unless you complete both courses. Prerequisites: EN110. Corequisite: IC206. This course requires permission from Jim Borgardt.

IC-208   The History of God (Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; IC) This course will give students an introduction to the concept of God in western culture and how our understanding of God has changed from the ancient Hebrews to the modern era. Topics will include how concepts of God have been influenced by politics and culture; the interrelationship between popular and intellectual religion; and how religious belief influences, and is influenced by power. Prerequisite: EN110 or EN109.

IC-209   Artist Naturalist (Either Semester; Variable; 4.00 Credits; IC) The goal of this course is to trace evolution of natural history illustration in America from the 18th to 19th century. Students will explore how natural history and systemics develop into evolutionary theories of the 19th century. As part of the investigation of natural history, scientists were often artists responsible for the aesthetic documentation of their natural history observations. Examples include William Barchman, Mark Catesby, Charles Wilson Pealle, and John James Audubon. Prerequisites: EN110. A field trip fee will be assessed.

IC-210   Comics and Culture (Spring; Variable; 4.00 Credits; IC) This course will explore the rule of comics in shaping and reflecting American culture. It will explore the basic structure of comics and graphic novels, the historical birth and evolution of the American comic book, and the counter culture response to these comics. Students will write and draw a short story in comic book format as well as write short assignments and a research paper. Prerequisite: EN110. A special fee for supplies and a field trip will apply.

IC-211   Identity in the Modern World (Spring; Variable; 4.00 Credits; IC) This course examines the cultural structures, systems, and beliefs that inform perceptions and definitions of our modern world. It also explores how the concept of the modern informs and affects how our identities (racial, ethnic, gender, national, etc.)are shaped and constructed. We use tools of themodern (texts, film, television, and the web) to explore understandings of our own identities as well as identities that are less familiar. The course seeks to assist students in examining their own culture(s) and is not primarily comparative in nature. However, at times cross-cultural comparisons are used in part to facilitate viewing our culture through the eyes of other groups. Prerequisite: EN110.

IC-212   Political Psychology (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; IC) This Interdisciplinary Colloquium examines the overlap between political science and psychology. Topics include how and why citizens from political attitudes, how elected officials make decisions, the influence of values, the structure of political beliefs and ideologies, how citizens interact with each other, political persuasion, and attitude change. Special attention will be given to using political psychology to understand contemporary politics. Prerequisites: EN110 and Sophomore, Junior or Senior standing.

IC-213   The Age of Goethe (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; IC) This course is an interdisciplinary survey of culture, literature, and philosophy during the Age of Goethe (the era of European Romanticism: 1770-1830). Focus on the concepts of the individual and self-consciousness, freedom and self-development, and subsequently the rise of alienation in the early nineteenth century. All readings and discussion in English. No prior familiarity with German intellectual history required. Students interested in receiving one additional German credit should sign up for GR 213.Prerequisites: EN110.

IC-214   Global Climate Change (3.00 Credits; IC) This course examines the science and politics of global climate change, including data and analyses in the assessment reports of the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. The course also examines how governments and other political actors craft and shape policies related to climate change. Special attention will be placed on the extent to which public policy is influenced by scientific evidence and political considerations. Prerequisites: EN110 or EN109.

IC-215   The Chemistry of Art (Spring; Variable; 4.00 Credits; IC,CW) This is an interdisciplinary course that explores the intersection of chemistry with the visual arts. You will learn about artists? materials, issues facing museum curators and conservators and many basic chemistry concepts as we explore the chemistry and history of art media such as paints, dyes, metals, alloys, ceramics, glass, plastics, paper and fibers, and photographic materials. Prerequisites: EN110. Note: A special course fee is applied.

IC-216   Wine in a Vessel (Fall; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; IC) This course is designed to introduce and foster the introspective practices, theories, and discourse of wine and ceramic vessels as known to man through the ages. These activities have shaped human culture on Earth for thousands of years; students will explore this tradition through wine-making, pottery, and cultural analyses of imbibing. This is a hands-on course that will involve interactive participation in Juniata's vineyard and Ceramic Studio, where wine and containment vessels will be created. Students will write a research paper of their chosen subject-matter (as pertinent to course topics) and are required to keep a journal of their chosen discipline throughout the semester. Both will incorporate revisions, peer and individual. Prerequisites: EN110 or EN109 and permission of instructor. Students must be 21 years of age to take this course.

IC-217   Data and Technology in Society (Summer; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; IC,CW) In the current information age, data and technology has become a ubiquitous part of our everyday lives. In this course, we will explore some of those technologies asking how they became ubiquitous and how they continue to shape ideologies in society. We will look at technology in several contexts including information processing, data consumption in popular texts, genetics, and social networking sites. Prerequisites: EN110 or EN109.

IC-218   African Develpment I (Fall; Yearly; 2.00 Credits) We will examine the ethical predicaments of humanitarianism in Africa. Does development aid help Africa, or does it reinforce American stereotypes about helpless Africans and create an inferiority complex among Africans? This course is linked to the 3 week winter trip to the Gambia and to the 1 credit spring IC219 course. Prerequisites: EN-110 or EN-109. IC219 is a corequisite. A trip fee is applied.

IC-219   African Development II (Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; IC) We will examine the ethical predicaments of humanitarianism in Africa. Does development aid help Africa,or does it reinforce American stereotypes about helpless Africans and create an inferiority complex among Africans? This course is linked to the 3 week winter trip to the Gambia and to the 2 credit fall IC218 course.

IC-220   Interpreting the Bible & Constitution (Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; IC) Both the Bible and the Constitution have been interpreted very differently at different times and by different people. How can we know which interpretations are right? Is there even such a thing as a " right " interpretation? This course examines the art of interpretation and critically evaluates some common and conflicting interpretations of the Bible and the Constitution.

IC-221   Art, Literature, and the Land (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; IC) This interdisciplinary course will enhance your understanding of, and appreciation for, the intersection of literature, art and biology. We will weave together the threads of literary, artistic and scientific perspectives as we study relevant archetypes and theories as related to depictions of the landscape and ecological practices throughout Native American and US history. Prerequisites: EN110 or EN109.

IC-222   Global Conversations (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; IC,CW) This course is meant to help students develop a better understanding of the environmental problems associated with economic globalization and thus to prepare them for active participation as citizens engaged in a " global conversation " in a civil society that is also global in scope. The fundamental assumption of the course is that the problems we face today as a species are massive and only by understanding them within a global context will we be able to find the solutions necessary for viable human habitation of the planet to continue. The course attempts to make a step toward these goals through helping students to " connect the dots " between a variety of issues including toxicity in the human body, consumerism, food, population, energy, and climate change among others, as well as online components that link students from 15 - 20 different countries throughout the world in Study Circles in which they work on a common project. Prerequisites: EN110 or EN109 (CWS).

IC-232   Mining in the Americas (Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; IC) This course examines how humans in North, Central, and South America have mined natural resources over the past 500 years, how these actions have changed nature and human societies, and how these changes can be compared. Students will work with minerals both in the field and in the classroom. Prerequisites: Take EN110 or EN109.

IC-261   Study Abroad Rwanda I (Fall; Variable; 1.00 Credit) Rwanda:Conflict, Memory, and Reconciliation. Corequisite: IC262. Full program runs Fall semester 2014 to January 17, 2015. Students will spend 2 weeks in Rwanda in between the Fall and Spring semesters. The course fee is $4500.00 (students will be billed half the fee each semester). Note: You do not receive IC credit unless you complete IC261 and IC262.

IC-262   Study Abroad Rwanda II (Spring; Variable; 2.00 Credits; IC) Rwanda:Conflict, Memory, and Reconciliation. Corequisite: IC262. Full program runs Fall semester 2014 to January 17, 2015. Students will spend 2 weeks in Rwanda in between the Fall and Spring semesters. The course fee is $4500.00 (students will be billed half the fee each semester). Note: You do not receive IC credit unless you complete IC261 and IC262.

IC-275   Project Management (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; IC,CW,CS) This course examines the challenges of providing project management in the information age of global and cultural contexts. Project management as manifested in today's workplace provides both opportunity, and a great responsibility. The role and function of project managers looks very different today than years ago. Change is the norm. Project managers must understand today's challenges and be able to function effectively given a borderless, multicultural, virtual, and diverse group of team members.

IC-288   Environ. Resource Entrepreneurship I (Variable; Yearly; 1.00 Credit) The goal of this course is to get an introduction into natural resource management in Taiwan from an environmental and a business perspective. As part of the course, we plan to have guest presentations from practitioners and experts in a range of natural resource topics including sustainable fisheries, aquaculture, wetland management, ecotourism, waste and water management, and Ecological Economics. Students enrolled in IC 288 are supposed to enroll in IC 289 as well, as students need to complete both IC 288 and IC 289 in order to obtain the IC credit. IC 289 includes a field trip to Taiwan.

IC-289   Environ. Resource Entrepreneurship II (Variable; Yearly; 2.00 Credits; IC) The goal of this course is to get an introduction into natural resource management in Taiwan from an environmental and a business perspective. As part of the course, we plan to have guest presentations from practitioners and experts in a range of natural resource topics including sustainable fisheries, aquaculture, wetland management, ecotourism, waste and water management, and Ecological Economics. Students enrolled in IC 288 are supposed to enroll in IC 289 as well, as students need to complete both IC 288 and IC 289 in order to obtain the IC credit. IC 289 includes a field trip to Taiwan.

IC-299   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 4.00 Credits; IC) Allows department to offer topics not normally taught. Prerequisite: EN110.

Cultural Analysis Courses:

CA-108   Intensive Arabic I (Summer; Yearly; 6.00 Credits; CA,I,H) This summer immersion program takes place in Fhs, Morocco, at the Ibn Ghazi Arabic Institute (IGIA). IGAI provides language instruction in Modern Standard Arabic for beginning, intermediate, or advanced speakers. Placement for students with prior knowledge of Arabic will be determined at the beginning of the program by IGAI.

CA-199   Special Topics (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allow department to offer topics not normally offered. Prerequisites and corequisites vary by title.

CA-208   Intensive Arabic II (Summer; Yearly; 6.00 Credits; CA,I,H) This summer immersion program takes place in Fhs, Morocco, at the Ibn Ghazi Arabic Institute (IGIA). IGAI provides language instruction in Modern Standard Arabic for beginning, intermediate, or advanced speakers. Placement for students with prior knowledge of Arabic will be determined at the beginning of the program by IGAI.

CA-214   Cinderella (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; CA) Surveys the historical and cultural origins and pathways of the Cinderella story. Students use folk-tale research to identify the thematic content of the Cinderella story, explore its reach, and understand its ubiquity in American popular culture. The course includes a major project for which students conduct library research in order to write an original Cinderella based in a culture for which we do not have an extant copy. Prerequisites: EN110 or EN109 or EN199B.

CA-217   China Today I (Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit) The course, which meets weekly after Spring Break and then includes a two-week trip to China, teaches students to analyze culture in contemporary China. Students will analyze cultural products such as film, literature, art, and architecture both before departure and during the trip to China. The course will culminate in a circa. 10-page research paper on some aspect of the culture of China today. Corequisites: CA218.

CA-218   China Today II (Summer; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; CA,I,CW) The course includes a two-week trip to China. It teaches students to analyze culture in contemporary China. Students will analyze cultural products such as film, literature, art, and architecture both before departure and during the trip to China. The course will culminate in a circa. 10-page research paper on some aspect of the culture of China today. Corequisites: CA217.

CA-227   Archaeoastronomy (Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; CA,N) An exploration of the role of astronomy and astronomers in early human cultures through an analysis of the scientific, historical, and social contexts in which these cultures existed. After a review of the principles of celestial mechanics as applied to the motion of the sun, moon, planets, and stars through the sky, we will study in depth the practice of astronomy in three ancient cultures, including their calendars, architecture, religion, and myths.

CA-228   Maya Astronomy (Spring; Variable; 1.00 Credit; CA,I) Traveling in a wide circle around and through the Yucatan Peninsula, the course will explore a variety of ruins, museums, and artifacts with the goal of understanding how the Classic Maya culture incorporated astronomy into their daily lives through their architecture, political systems, religious practices, and calendar system. Lectures on Maya history, archaeoastronomy, calendars, hieroglyphs and architecture will be presented during the evenings. Prerequisites: CA227.

CA-250   Gambian Culture (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; CA) All students participating in the KSAC program in The Gambia must enroll in the KSAC Gambia Culture Course. It is a three-credit language and culture course which consists of lectures and discussions with various speakers and excursions that are meant to expose students to Gambian culture and society in a significant way. Throughout the semester, students are required to take part in cultural activities, site visits, excursions, (including trips which last several days), and listen to guest lecturers. A key part of the KSAC Culture Course is Wolof language instruction.

CA-258   Leading Cultural Change (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; CA,S) Cultures are predisposed to change and at the same time resistant to it. Cultural behaviors, traditions, activities, policies, and processes are influenced through change. This course is designed to promote understanding of the role of change in cultures at both micro- and macro-system levels and how culture can be modified through innovation, invention, and change. Essentially, students will learn the knowledge and skills necessary to be effective change agents within cultures. Using selected models of argument development, students will incorporate this information into class discussions, write a major paper, and deliver a presentation on an issue related to their specific area(s) of study.

CA-270   Infectious Disease & Society (Either Semester; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; CA) This course focuses in infectious disease from different cultural perspectives. We discuss case studies across time and region, exploring how pathogens have shaped cultural landscapes, and how cultural perceptions affect infection. We study different cultures (modern and historical) to see how the react to an epidemic and use infection's threat. We end with a cultural analysis of aids. Prerequisites: Sophomore, Junior, or Senior standing.

CA-299   Special Topics (Fall; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits; CA) Allows departments to offer topics not normally taught.

CA-310   Beyond Tolerance (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; CA) This course will present both theories and practices of multiculturalism in the United States. Through the Beyond Tolerance Workshops, film, texts and class activities students will analyze stereotypes, power, privilege and personal views of American cultures and subcultures. Students must have Sophomore standing to take this class.

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