Catalog 2014-15

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Accounting, Business, and Economics (ABE)

Department Website:

http://www.juniata.edu/departments/abe/

Faculty:

Background Information:

All business programs at Juniata College are crafted to give each student the tools to analyze, think, and perform.  To achieve these goals, each student is provided with the opportunity to learn to use information to make decisions, work effectively with others, communicate effectively, and have experiences, like internships and study abroad options, to develop the ability to think and act broadly. The department makes available several opportunities for “real world” experiential learning.

Special programs, facilities, or equipment:

Programs of Emphasis:

Student Designed Programs of Emphasis (examples):

Secondary Emphasis:

Internship/Research Experiences:

Courses:

EB-101   Introduction to Business (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) A broad survey of business topics. The Emphasis is on developing a basic understanding of business concepts and practices, and basic analytical skills used in business.

EB-102   Introduction to Entrepreneurship (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Students will explore the personal ramification of becoming an entrepreneur. They will generate ideas for new business start-ups and learn how to determine whether an idea represents a viable business opportunity. Students will develop their concepts as far as possible toward the actual startup venture. Prerequisite: EB101 or permission of the instructor.

EB-105   International Economic Issues (Fall & Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S,I) Understanding international economics is increasingly important for private and public decision-makers. In a world of growing economic interdependence, the ability of policy makers to provide a stable environment for business is a key issue. Accordingly, this course develops the principle topics of international economics, including trade theory, the balance of payments, the cause and consequences of exchange rate movements, the flow of capital, currency crises and regional trade issues. The applied topics emphasized will be based on the most pressing current issues.

EB-131   Financial Accounting (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Introduces fundamental principles and assumptions of accounting as they relate to transaction analysis and basic financial statements.

EB-140   Investing: Your Future (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; S) Saving too little can cost you a secure future. In this course you will learn to make informed judgments about how to save, how much to save, how to invest, what to believe, who to ask for advice, and how to choose among investments. Students with no investing knowledge but who are interested are especially encouraged to take this course.

EB-199   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows the department to offer special topics not normally offered. Departments may offer more than one special topic. Prerequisites vary by title.

EB-201   The Management Process (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Studies some of the primary functions of managers in organizing, and controlling. Introduces the basics of strategic management. Method of instruction combines lecture, in-class exercises, case analysis, and an experimental project. The experimental project asks students to actually perform as managers. Prerequisite: Sophomore or higher standing.

EB-202   Behavioral Analysis of Organizations (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; CW,S) The broad focus of the course is to examine how individuals come together to form a successful organization. The course is broken into three major sections: people, organizations, and leadership. The course emphasizes student involvement and engages students in a variety of in-class exercises, case analysis role playing exercises, small group exercises, and an off-campus class experience or two. One or more off-campus experiences are required for the course. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

EB-203   Introduction to Business Law (Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S) An introduction to the American legal system as it applies to the business community. Emphasis is on basic legal concepts in contracts, real and personal property, agency and employment, and transaction of business through partnerships and corporations. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

EB-204   Legal Regulation of Business (Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S) Examines the areas in which by statute the legislative branch of government regulates business. Topics include anti-trust law, bankruptcy, consumer protection, securities laws and the uniform commercial code. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

EB-207   New Venture Creation (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Students will analyze business start-up successes and failures, develop their own new ideas for new ventures and learn how to determine when an idea represents a viable business opportunity. Students will pursue those opportunities as far as possible toward actual startup of the venture. Prerequisites: EB102.

EB-210   Quantitative Business Analysis (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; QM,S) This course introduces quantitative techniques for solving business problems and works to establish a link between data analysis and business decision- making. The course presents algebra, graphical methods, applied calculus, and descriptive statistics as tools to aid business decision makers. Prerequisites: High school algebra or pre-calculus.

EB-211   Business Statistics (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; QS,S) This course covers topics comparing parameters between populations, ANOVA, Regression Analysis, Forecasting and Decision Analysis.

EB-222   Principles of Macroeconomics (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Macroeconomic conditions affect individuals and businesses in numerous ways: employment opportunities, the purchasing power of wages and salaries, the cost of borrowing money, sales, profits, and competitiveness against foreign businesses. This course develops the theories relevant to understanding the business cycle, inflation, unemployment, deflation, exchange rates and balance of payments problems. It also examines the options and tradeoffs governments face as they seek to provide a stable macroeconomic environment through monetary and fiscal policies. Case studies of the macroeconomic performance and policies of diverse countries provide a comparative orientation. Prerequisites: Sophomore, Junior, or Senior standing

EB-223   Principles of Microeconomics (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) The optimizing behavior of households and firms serves as the focal point in this study of market-based resource allocation. Supply and demand analysis, spending and saving decisions of households, production and employment decisions of firms, alternative market structures, and environmental economics are among the topics covered. Prerequisite: Sophomore, Junior, or Senior standing.

EB-232   Intermediate Accounting I (Fall; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; S) A comprehensive study and application of generally accepted accounting principles for asset valuation, income measurement, and financial statement presentation for business organizations. Prerequisites: EB131.

EB-233   Intermediate Accounting II (Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; S) A continuation of the comprehensive study and application of generally accepted accounting principles for asset valuation, income measurement, and financial statement presentation for business organizations begun in Intermediate Accounting I. Prerequisite: EB232.

EB-236   Managerial Accounting (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; S,QM,CW) Emphasizes accounting concepts for the internal use of management in planning and control. Course focuses on spreadsheet applications to analyze management policies. Prerequisite: EB131.

EB-299   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows the department to offer special topics not normally offered. Departments may offer more than one special topic. Prerequisites vary by title.

EB-300   Business in China I (Spring; Yearly; 2.00 Credits; I) This course will examine 1) the history of the Economic Reform that triggered the economic growth in 1988 in China; 2) the role that international trade has played that promoted the economic growth in China; 3) the civic life of China, particularly from the business perspective; and 4) the basic conversational Mandarin Chinese and Chinese business etiquette that help students get by in China. We will review basic economics concepts and introduce students to the fundamentals of economic theory. We will apply economic reasoning to think critically about the public policies, business decisions, and general tradeoffs that help explain the recent economic growth in China. Another objective of the course is to connect students with internship opportunities by physically visiting multinational enterprises in China and connecting with Juniata alumni in China. Students will gain a better understanding of China and better prepare those who want to start their careers in China. This course adds important value to the ABE department and the business curriculum as the course design is consistent with the college strategic plan with respect to China. Corequisite: EB301. Note: There are no refunds after drop/add ends.

EB-301   Business in China II (Summer; Yearly; 2.00 Credits; CA,I) This course will examine 1) the history of the Economic Reform that triggered the economic growth in 1988 in China; 2) the role that international trade has played that promoted the economic growth in China; 3) the civic life of China, particularly from the business perspective; and 4) the basic conversational Mandarin Chinese and Chinese business etiquette that help students get by in China. We will review basic economics concepts and introduce students to the fundamentals of economic theory. We will apply economic reasoning to think critically about the public policies, business decisions, and general tradeoffs that help explain the recent economic growth in China. Another objective of the course is to connect students with internship opportunities by physically visiting multinational enterprises in China and connecting with Juniata alumni in China. Students will gain a better understanding of China and better prepare those who want to start their careers in China. This course adds important value to the ABE department and the business curriculum as the course design is consistent with the college strategic plan with respect to China. Corequisite: EB300.

EB-307   New Venture Start-Ups (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Students will develop their new ventures beyond the conceptual and planning stages by establishing actual operations-purchasing, manufacturing, marketing, etc. to generate revenue. They will implement whatever support systems (accounting, human resources, inventory management, etc.) are needed. Prerequisite: EB207.

EB-320   Intermediate Microeconomics (Fall; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S) Microeconomics analyzes the behavior of individual economic units such as consumers and firms. Intermediate microeconomics builds on the topics covered in principles of microeconomics and principles of macroeconomics. While those courses were more intuitive, this course explores microeconomics with a deeper degree of rigor using mathematical models to predict economic behavior. Prerequisites include EB223 and EB222.

EB-321   Intermediate Macroeconomics (Fall; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S) Intermediate Macroeconomics builds upon the concepts developed in principles of microeconomics and principles of macroeconomics. Macroeconomics in general tries to understand the aggregate behavior of economies rather than that of individual economic actors, and in this course we will study and use models that help explain what has happened in the past and predict what will occur. Prerequisites: EB222 and EB223.

EB-332   Corporate Taxation (Fall; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S) This course is intended for undergraduates who desire to learn how the IRS code applies to corporations. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing.

EB-333   Governmental and Nonprofit Accounting (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Governmental and Nonprofit Accounting is designed to provide an overview of fundamental concepts and practices used in accounting for activities of governmental and non-business organizations. After successfully completing the course, students will be familiar with recording financial transactions, preparing financial reports, budgeting, auditing, and analyzing the results for federal, state and local governments, colleges and universities, healthcare organizations and other nonprofits. Prerequisite: EB 233 Intermediate Accounting II.

EB-334   Advanced Accounting (Fall; Even Years; 3.00 Credits; S) Focuses on accounting theory and problems regarding such specialized topics as: partnerships, consolidated financial statements, governmental accounting, multi-national enterprises and corporate bankruptcy. Prerequisite: EB233.

EB-335   Auditing (Spring; Odd Years; 3.00 Credits; S) Emphasizes current auditing principles and the objectives of independent accounting firms. Particular attention is placed on auditing procedures and the ethical and legal responsibilities of the auditor. Prerequisite: EB233.

EB-336   Federal Taxation: Individuals (Spring; Even Years; 3.00 Credits; S) Examines the federal income tax structure and its relationship to individuals and sole proprietorships. Emphasis is placed on the preparation of the individual income tax return. Prerequisite: EB131.

EB-337   Cost Accounting (Either Semester; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) An analysis of the use of cost accounting systems to accumulate and allocate manufacturing costs. In order to support inventory valuation and emphasis is on solving real business problems. Prerequisite: EB236 and Junior or Senior standing.

EB-340   Investing Analysis (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; S) The course is meant to train portfolio managers. Students will maintain an online trading account and learn about fiduciary responsibility. They will assist portfolio managers by analyzing investments and with other tasks. This course preparesstudents to become portfolio managers. Prerequisites: EB140

EB-341   Product and Operations Management (Either Semester; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Examines the necessary things business firms must do to efficiently convert inputs to outputs. The course is about equally divided between qualitative operations management theory and quantitative tools that have been developed to solve typically occurring problems in production/ operations. Prerequisites: EB201.

EB-342   Management Information Systems (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) The study of how computer technology is used to gather, store, organize, retrieve, and transmit information within and between organizations. Topics include the organizational and technical foundations of information systems, the contemporary tools and techniques for building systems, and the management of information system resources. Emphasizes current computer platform applications and techniques used in business. Prerequisites: EB201 (EB201 can be taken concurrently) and Junior or Senior standing.

EB-351   Marketing Management (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Analyzes consumer behavior leading to selection of product as well as pricing, promotion and distribution strategies. Research projects help students apply concepts to the complexities of decision making in marketing. Prerequisite: EB201.

EB-355   Marketing Strategies (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Examines in depth the development and implementation of marketing strategies, for businesses and not-for-profits, for domestic and international businesses. Prerequisite: EB351.

EB-357   Cyber Marketing (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S,CW) This course examines the challenges of marketing in the Information Age. Information technology, as manifested in the Internet and other enabling technologies, creates a valuable marketing opportunity, and a great peril. As customers and competitors learn the power of real-time information, companies must learn to compete in a world where location and other long-held advantages may be less important.

EB-361   Financial Management I (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) The management of business assets and liabilities and the concurrent creation of sources and the use of funds. Special attention is given to financial statement analysis and decisions involving working capital management. Prerequisite: EB131 and Junior or Senior standing.

EB-362   Financial Management II (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; QM,S) Special attention to long-term external sources of funds. Capital budgeting under uncertainty, security market processes, strategies for debt/ equity mix, and portfolio theory are covered. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing.

EB-371   Human Resource Management. (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) The early part of the course takes an in-depth look at the fundamental nature of the employer- employee relationship. The fundamental framework is then used to evaluate traditional aspects of Human Resource Management practice: Selection, training, recruitment, performance appraisals, and compensation. Class time involves some lecture, in-class exercises, guest speakers from industry, and case analyses. Prerequisites: EB202.

EB-377   Sports Management (Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S,CS) Sports Management will explore the many business and socio-cultural aspects of the business of sports. Sport plays an increasingly significant role in our world as professional and collegiate sports attract more and more of our entertainment spending and sports personalities become more central and idolized in society. This exploration of the sports industry will connect well with other areas of business study: organizational behavior, strategy, human resource management, and marketing. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

EB-379   Bargaining and Conflict Management (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S,CS) Bargaining and Conflict Management provides students with an opportunity to learn about bargaining and conflict-management theory. Students will have the opportunity to explore and apply this theory, and to examine aspects of bargaining style, in a variety of bargaining simulations. The course will also have an international component by utilizing international bargaining simulations as an instructional tool. Prerequisite: EB202.

EB-381   International Political Economy (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S,I) The pursuit of wealth and power, profit and privilege, corporate growth and national security occurs in a global context. This course examines the business agendas and political priorities that find expression in the policy agreements and institutional agreements of the contemporary global economy. The course is conducted as a seminar and requires a substantial research project. Prerequisite: EB105.

EB-399   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Offers special studies to meet the interest and demands of Students. Note: Students may take each ST: course for credit.

EB-407   Entrepreneurship (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Examines the application of administrative and functional fields to small business situations. Special attention is given to the problems typical of the small business. Projects and local businesses may be used as cases. Prerequisites: EB307 or permission of the instructor.

EB-440   Portfolio Management I (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; S) Students manage the Juniata College student portfolio, making all investment decisions about policy, trading, and long term goals. They present a progress report to the public, benchmark and account for the investments, and defend their choices. Prerequisites: EB140 and EB340 or EB362 or permission of the instructor.

EB-441   Portfolio Management II (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; S) Students manage the Juniata College student portfolio, making all investment decisions about policy, trading, and long term goals. They present a progress report to the public, benchmark and account for the investments, and defend their choices. Prerequisites: EB140 and EB340 or EB362 or permission of the instructor.

EB-442   Portfolio Management III (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; S) Students manage the Juniata College student portfolio, making all investment decisions about policy, trading, and long term goals. They present a progress report to the public, benchmark and account for the investments, and defend their choices. Prerequisites: EB140 and EB340 or EB362 or permission of the instructor.

EB-443   Portfolio Management IV (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; S) Students manage the Juniata College student portfolio, making all investment decisions about policy, trading, and long term goals. They present a progress report to the public, benchmark and account for the investments, and defend their choices. Prerequisites: EB140 and EB340 or EB362 or permission of the instructor.

EB-463   Financial Markets & Institutions (Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S,I) The role of credit and capital and the function of dollar and Euro bonds in today's internationalized financial markets are investigated empirically and assessed analytically in this course. Numerous economic theories relevant to understanding the behavior of various asset markets are developed, including portfolio and asset models of exchange rate determination and currency speculation. The costs and benefits of alternative government policies such as financial regulation and capital and foreign exchange controls are weighed. Prerequisite: EB222.

EB-464   Investments (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) The study of the basic concepts, analysis techniques and strategies for investing in portfolios of securities. Stocks, bonds, options and futures are examined as well as fundamental, technical and efficient market strategies. Prerequisites: EB 362.

EB-465   Financial Theory and Analysis (Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S) Financial Theory & Analysis will be a finance elective aimed at juniors and seniors. EB465's purpose is to develop an understanding of traditional modern portfolio theory, recent challenges to this orthodoxy, empirical knowledge of asset performance and how to apply this knowledge to specific contexts, i.e. creating an appropriate portfolio. Prerequisites: EB211 and EB362. MA220 may be used as a replacement for EB211 only.

EB-470   Distinction Seminar (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00-4.00 Credits; S)

EB-480   Senior Seminar (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) A capstone course for POE in Business. Through the use of readings, case studies and simulations, students in the course will formulate corporate strategy and implement it in a competitive environment. How firms may gain and sustain competitive advantage with the formulated strategy will be examined. In addition, students will also be trained to craft business reports on corporate strategies. The evaluation of performance will mainly depend on the content and the quality of the business reports.

EB-490   Business Internship (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 2.00-9.00 Credits; S) Develops students' skills, through practical experiences or field projects which require proposals for problem analysis and solution. The experiences and projects are provided by local businesses or other organizations and use technical and decision skills developed in students' areas of concentration. Note: Limited availability. May be repeated up to a total of 9 hours credit. Corequisite: EB495. Prerequisites: Permission and Jr. or Sr. standing.

EB-495   Business Internship Seminar (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 2.00-6.00 Credits; S) Requires students to reflect on the experience and/or pursue relevant research. Note: Limited availability. May be repeated up to a total of 6 hours credit. Corequisite: EB490. Prerequisites: Permission.

EB-499   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) This course allows departments to offer topics not normally taught to be offered. Prerequisites and title vary by section.

EB-TUT   Business Teaching Assistant (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S)

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