Catalog 2013-14

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Non-Departmental (ND, ND.SS)

Faculty:

While many interdisciplinary courses are found among the College’s department offerings, some are taught outside that structure. They may be used in constructing a Program of Emphasis.

Courses:

ND-102   Introduction to Library Research (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; H) This one hour, one semester course is designed to teach students the fundamentals of library research, from the basic organization of materials through the analytical process of determining useful and appropriate research materials. This course will be taught every semester by the library staff, and there is no pre- requisite.

ND-199   ND Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows departments to offer courses not normally taught. Prerequisites and fees vary by course titles.

ND-201   Community Engagement (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; S) Students enrolled in this class will integrate service in the community with individual reflection and classroom discussion. Work completed in the community will help students gain an understanding of the agencies that operate in the greater Huntingdon area and the services they provide. Additionally, students' presence in the community facilitates development of strong partnerships between the college and the public. In the classroom, students will be challenged to consider their volunteer experiences with respect to relevant local and global issues. Students will gain exposure to different cultural and economic institutions, explore what it means to be an active citizen, develop a sense of civic and social responsibility, and learn how they might incorporate service into other facets of their lives. May be repeated to a total of 4 credits with the permission of the instructor. Graded S (satisfactory) or U (unsatisfactory).

ND-203A   Urban Immersion (Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit) Students enrolled in this class will participate in a service-learning trip to explore urban issues through various service and educational experiences. Involvement in trip activities will help students develop a foundation of knowledge about the importance of civic and community engagement. Online lessons and orientation sessions preceding the trip will facilitate development of learning objectives and provide background information related to the region in which the group will serve. The service experience will be complemented by discussion and reflection before, during, and after the trip. Applications accepted in fall. Associated fees vary by trip. Note: This course requires 25 hours of out of class time per semester.

ND-203B   Spring Break Alternative (Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit) Students enrolled in this class will participate in a service-learning trip to explore social, cultural, political and/or environmental issues through various service and educational experiences. Involvement in trip activities will help students develop a foundation of knowledge about the importance of civic and community engagement. Online lessons and orientation sessions preceding the trip will facilitate development of learning objectives and provide background information related to the region in which the group will serve. The service experience will be complemented by discussion and reflection before, during, and after the trip. Prerequisite: Course fee plus air fare, if necessary, will be charged. Applications accepted in fall and spring. Note: This course requires 25 hours of out of class time per semester.

ND-203C   Cultural Learning Tour (Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit) Students enrolled in this class will participate in a service-learning trip to explore social, cultural, political and/or environmental issues through various service and educational experiences. Involvement in trip activities will help students develop a foundation of knowledge about the importance of civic and community engagement. Biweekly meetings in spring semester will facilitate development of learning objectives and provide background information related to the region in which the group will serve. The service experience will be complemented by discussion and reflection before, during, and after the trip. Applications are accepted in fall. Associated fees vary by trip. Note: This course requires 25 hours of out of class time per semester.

ND-260   Remote Field Course I (Summer; Yearly; 0.00-2.00 Credits) This course is a 16 day module format field experience in south western Colorado and southeastern Utah. Students will complete a selection of modules in one or more of the following areas: anthropology, ecology, environmental science and studies or geology. Four faculty, one from each of these disciplines, will supervise the different modules. All students will also complete integrated, interdisciplinary modules. Summer school offering only. Prerequisites: Differs for each module and permission of instructor.

ND-261   Remote Field Course II (Summer; Yearly; 2.00 Credits) This course is a 16-day module-format field experience in Southwestern Colorado and southeastern Utah. Students will complete a selection of modules in one or more of the following areas: Anthropology, ecology, environmental science and studies or geology. Four faculty, one from each of these disciplines, will supervise the different modules. All students will also complete integrated, interdisciplinary modules that are different than the modules students took in ND260. Summer school offering only. Prerequisites: Differs for each module and ND260 and permission of instructor.

ND-262A   Astronomy and Meteors Mini Labs for Remote Field Course (Summer; Yearly; 0.00 Credits) Astronomy and astrogeology, including the study of meteorites, continue to play a fundamental role in both our cultural and scientific evolution. Students will visit the famous Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, AZ, and two craters in north east Arizona. Corequisites: ND260 or ND261 or IC207. Note: A special course fee is assessed.

ND-262B   Lake Powell Lab Mini Labs for Remote Field Course (Summer; Yearly; 0.00 Credits) We will spend three days boating on Lake Powell while discussing and studying the results of the Glen Canyon Dam, including exploring the controversy from a view of water supply, economic and environmental impacts. Corequisites: ND260 or ND261 or IC207. Note: A special course fee is assessed.

ND-262C   The Atomic Age (Summer; Yearly; 0.00 Credits) On July 16, 1945 the world changed with the explosion of the first atomic bomb at the Trinity site, near Socorro, New Mexico. This module will visit a number of sites in New Mexico and Arizona which have played a seminal role in the " atomic age " . Corequisites: ND260 or ND261 or IC207.

ND-262D   Moab's Natural Wonders Mini Labs for Remote Field Course (Summer; Yearly; 0.00 Credits) Moab offers a wealth of natural beauty, including Arches National Parkand the Colorado River. Students in this module will learn about fluid flow during a one-day rafting trip on the Colorado. We'll visit Arches National Park and examine some of its well-known features, such as the physical blueprint of the arches and Balanced Rock, from a physics perspective. Corequisites: ND260 or ND261 or IC207. Note: A special course fee is assessed.

ND-262E   Southwestern Geology-RFC (Summer; Yearly; 0.00 Credits) During this module we cover the following topics : observe various types of volcanic activity in the area and think about origins, describe and sketch various rock structures in the field, collect interesting igneous rocks, and read and understand topographical maps and how they can express regional geology. Corequisites: ND260 or ND261 or IC207.

ND-262F   Scenic Lands (Summer; Yearly; 0.00 Credits) Snow-covered rugged mountain peaks, reaching nearly 13,000 feet in elevation. A break-neck deep gorge with more tight bends and twist than a Quenton Tarantino movie plot. Stone arches immense yet delicate. A labyrinth of colorful mesas and needle-like buttes. The southwest corner of Utah contains a diversity of spectacular scenery that has to be seen to appreciate. During this module we will visit four of the most scenic areas in the southwest and explore the natural forces that formed and sculpted them. Additionally, we will investigate how the governmental agencies that oversee and regulate each area protect and manage these natural wonders. Corequisites: ND260 or ND261 or IC207.

ND-262G   Biodiv. S.W. Ecosystems (Summer; Yearly; 0.00 Credits) This module reveals the biotic diversity of unique desert ecosystems of southeastern Arizona - the Sonoran Desert and Chihuahuan Desert. This module examines the plant and animal associations and adaptations exhibited in this arid environment. This region contains arid desert flats, rocky canyons, creeks, alpine meadows and talus slopes. We will investigate the plant and animal diversity of the Chiricahua and Dragon Mountains through hands-on exploration. We will traverse a range of elevations; from desert flats (4,000 ft.) to mountain peaks (nearly 9,000 ft.).

ND-262H   Moab Rock Art (Summer; Yearly; 0.00 Credits) During this module, Students learn to identify and interpret styles of rock art at a variety of spectacular sites. These sites range in period from the Archaic (5500 BC to 1 AD), the Anasazi (1 AD to 1275 AD), Fremont (450 AD to 1250 AD), the Formative Period (1 AD to 1275 AD), and Ute (1200 AD to 1880 AD). Corequisites: ND260 or ND261 or IC207.

ND-262I   Species Interaction (Summer; Yearly; 0.00 Credits) This module takes place in and around the Canyon lands and Arches National Parks outside of Moab, UT. We will collect data that differentiates a sympatric assemblage of lizards in the region. Collared (Crotaphytus collaris), side-blotch (UTA stansburiana), tree (Urosaurus ornatus), whiptail (Cnemidophorus tesselatus), and plateau lizards (Sceloporus undulatus) will be characterized based on several ecological and physiological parameters. We will also explore the biodiversity and conservation/land-use issues of this region. Ancillary ventures will include a trek to the base of Mount Peale (12,721 ft.) and the Matheson Wetland Preserve. Corequisites: ND260 or ND261 or IC207.

ND-262J   Dinosaurs (Summer; Yearly; 0.00 Credits) The Southwest contains some of the best dinosaur fossil sites in the world, and we take advantage of this, by visiting the Cleveland-Lloyd Quarry, sites in the Moab, UT area that contain extraordinary dinosaur footprints, Mill Canyon dinosaur quarry and the dinosaur display at College of Eastern Utah Prehistoric Museum. Corequisites: ND260 or ND261 or IC207.

ND-262K   Interpret Past/Present (Summer; Yearly; 0.00 Credits) We will explore the prehistoric and present indigenous cultures, agriculture, religion, social and political organization. We will visit ruins ranging from Mesa Verde National Monument (maintained by the National Park Service) to the Ute Mountain Tribal Park on the Ute Mountain reservation. We will also participate in a one- half day work project for the Ute Mountain Tribe. We will contrast the ruins seen at Mesa Verde and the Ute Mountain Tribal Park with reconstructed ruins we will visit in New Mexico. We will also observe and discuss contemporary American Indian economic problems and strategies. Corequisites: ND260 or ND261 or IC207.

ND-262L   Anasazi Culture/Eviron. (Summer; Yearly; 0.00 Credits) edge of the Cedars, Hovenweep, Butler Wash and the Horsecollar Ruins: A closer look at Anasazi Culture and Environments. Corequisites: ND260 or ND261 or IC207.

ND-262M   Ecotonal Transitions (Summer; Yearly; 0.00 Credits) This module compares the two sides of the Grand Canyon-the South Rim (an arid ecosystem at 6,300 ft. elevation) and the North Rim (a ponderosa pine dominated habitat at 8,200 ft. elevation). We will examine the plant and animal associations that differentiate bothsides of the Canyon. This module involves hiking into the Grand Canyon-while not overly strenuous, does require a certain degree of physical fitness. The trip from the South Rim to the North Rim of the Canyon takes us through arid flatlands of the Colorado Plateau.

ND-262N   Southwest Geology (Summer; Yearly; 0.00 Credits) Module for remote field course.

ND-262O   Alien Abduction (Summer; Yearly; 0.00 Credits) When ask, many people express a belief in the notion that alien life forms have visited the earth. Further, some people believe not only that aliens have visited earth, but that they have been abducted by aliens for various purposes. We will examine the psychological foundation for these beliefs while visiting Roswell, NM, site of one of the most famous alien sightings. Corequisites: ND261 or ND262 or IC206.

ND-262P   Erosion and Land Use (Summer; Yearly; 0.00 Credits) During this module we cover the following topics: observe various types of glacial deposits and landforms, appreciate the erosional importance of water in arid climates, examine relationships between geology, climate and land use, and identify unstable landforms.

ND-262Q   Altitude and Cognition (Summer; Yearly; 0.00 Credits) There have been a number of case histories of climbers who have experienced rapid changes in altitude that report confusion, amnesia and other cognitive difficulties. We will focus specifically on alterations of working memory performance due to altitude. We will climb into the San Juan National Forest and reach an altitude of 13,000 feet above sea level. Once at the top, we will measure our performance on several classic working memory tasks. Corequisites: ND261 or ND262 or IC206.

ND-262R   Sex Effect on Navigation (Summer; Yearly; 0.00 Credits) There are a number of old wives tales about how both men and women navigate in their environment, including men never ask for directions and women get lost easily. We will investigate these old wives tales in more detail, by systematically examining how both sexes perform on real world navigation tasks. We will visit the Fiery Furnace in Arches National Park. This area of " infant arches " is, in fact, an excellent example of a real world maze. The following day, we will wander around the downtown area of Moab, asking for directions to assess the differences in how men and women give directions. Corequisites: ND261 or ND262 or IC207.

ND-262S   Living in Sacred Spaces (Summer; Yearly; 0.00 Credits) During this module, students will learn how Historic and contemporary Sinagua, Hopi, Tewa, Navajo, and New Age tourist societies adapt to and live in a harsh desert climate. They will leran through exploring subsistence strategies, agriculture, and architecture at several different sites. No additional fee required.

ND-262T   Agriculture Over 3000 Years (Summer; Variable; 0.00 Credits) During this 4 day module, we'll be exploring museums as educational resources and discover the impact of agricultural change over 3000 years. Over the first two days, come explore the New Mexico Farm and Ranch Museum and the Amerind Foundation Museum and learn about setting up exhibits, and explore the agricultural artifacts dating back 3000 years. Are there lessons to learn from the past? On the third day we'll head to the Sonora Desert Museum and wrap up on the fourth day with the Casa Grande Ruins before arriving at the Grand Canyon. Evenings will be spent hiking and camping with the biology module.

ND-262U   Capturing the Canyons and Traveling Highway 12 (Summer; Variable; 0.00 Credits) During this three day module (after the Grand Canyon), we will be traveling to Little Antelope Slot Canyon, visit the Glen Canyon Dam and camp at Bryce Canyon. The second day we'll hike Bryce Canyon, enjoying both the sunrise and sunset in this spectacular canyon, staying there the second night too. On the third day, we'll travel Highway 12 (on our way to Moab), named one of America's Highways for its scenic beauty. It is lined with education placards and lots of hidden gems - we'll stop along the way at various spots -(but, as a group, we'll plan the stops). Ultimately, each student will create a virtual " field trip, " using PhotoStory or i-Photo. Narration of the sites should be included (you'll need your computer, a camera, and the USB cord or firewire to download pics and or video for this module).

ND-262V   Visitor Centers and Movies As Educational " resources " -- Have ?westerns " Influenced Our View of the West? (Summer; Variable; 0.00 Credits) This module will include two day trips. One to Dead Horse State Park, called the Grand Canyon of Utah and the site of many movies. It also includes a small, but beautiful visitor?s center with interactive displays for all ages. We'll be hiking some of the trails and checking out why this location is a popular site for movies. The second trip will be to the Moab Museum of Film & Western Heritage and will focus on the use of movies and their impact as educational resources and how they shaped out image of the west and Native Americans.

ND-262X   Earth, Air, Fire, Water (Summer; Yearly; 0.00 Credits) The Colorado Plateau is a beautiful but harsh land, leaving bare to view the record of a a tumultuous geologic history and a landscape that challenges the ingenuity of those who would dwell there. This module visits pueblo, cliff, and contemporary sites where dwellers have dealt in diverse ways with extremes of wind and weather, lack of water for livestock and crops, a landscape with poor and limiting soils, and sometimes hostile neighbors. This module explores the strategies that residents have used in trying to make the most of what the Earth has to offer. Must be concurrently enrolled in IC 207 for which a special fee is levied.

ND-290   Rural Health Care Issues (Fall; Yearly; 1.00 Credit) Health professionals from both conventional and alternative medicine in Huntingdon will introduce students to their practices, the education involved, and the pros and cons of practicing in a small town. Students will be exposed to the integrative model of health care, will have an opportunity to network with practitioners, and will be encouraged to consider a future practice in Huntingdon.

ND-295   Rural Health Rotations (Fall; Yearly; 2.00 Credits) Students with a sincere interest in rural health care shadow a range of practitioners and participate in a health-related community service project. This course is graded. Open to a maximum of 12 students. Corequisite: ND 290. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

ND-298   Transitions (Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit) Faculty, staff, alumni, and guests will provide expertise and advice designed to help students understand and prepare for successful transitions. The process of transition (loss of what is familiar and known) will be discussed utilizing models of behavior within social systems and personal experiences. Case studies will examine: changing career goals; adjusting to cultural differences; the transition from life as an undergraduate to life as a graduate student; work life unreadiness; lifestyle adjustments such as financial independence, rural to urban, and changing relationships.

ND-299   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows department to offer courses not normally taught. Prerequisites vary by title.

ND-306   Commonwealth Student Assistance Program- Undergraduate Program (Either Semester; Yearly; 2.00 Credits) The Commonwealth Student Assistance Program (SAP) course will provide an in-depth theoretical and practical course of study, designed to identify risk factors that inhibit and become barriers to students in the middle/high school settings. Juniata students will be introduced to different behaviors associated with mental health, drug and alcohol and family issues that they will encounter while working with adolescents in the education system. POE's in the Social Sciences, Education and Health fields who have an interest with working with adolescents are encouraged to take this course. Must have Junior or Senior status.

ND-308   Science Olympiad Leadership (Spring; Yearly; 1.00-3.00 Credits) Offers the opportunity for active participation in the planning, designing, and implementation of the Science Olympiad State Competition held at Juniata each year. Register with permission of instructor.

ND-399   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 2.00-9.00 Credits) Allows the departments to offer special topics not normally offered. Departments may offer more than one special topic. Prerequisites vary by title.

ND-490   ND Intern/Needs Paperwork (Spring; Yearly; 2.00-9.00 Credits) See the chapter, " Special Programs " under " Internships " in the catalog. Corequisite: ND495. Prerequisite: Permission and Jr. or Sr. Standing.

ND-495   Internship Seminar (Variable; Variable; 2.00-6.00 Credits) Required of all students doing an internship. Emphasis is on readings and discussions of materials relevant to the internship experience. Corequisite: ND490.

ND-TUT   ND Teaching Assistant (Variable; Variable; 1.00-3.00 Credits) See catalog.

ND.SS-100   Career Planning (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; S) Examines theories of occupational choice and career development and provides the learner with the opportunity to become more aware of his/her interests, values and capacities as they relate to the career decision making process. Prerequisites: Freshman or Sophomores only.

ND.SS-205   The 21st Century Career Search (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit) Students will be provided an overview of job, career and graduate/professional school search techniques. They will learn to write professional and effective resumes portfolios and other job search correspondence while also enhancing interpersonal skills to be used at job fairs, interviews and other professional settings. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing.

ND.SS-214   Statistics for Social Science (Fall; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; S,QS) An introduction to descriptive and inferential statistical techniques used in the social sciences. Primary emphasis is placed on learning to choose and interpret appropriate techniques for various kinds of data. Prerequisites: Sophomore, Junior, or Senior standing.

ND.SS-215   Social Science Research Methods (Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; S) An analysis of the procedures, strengths and limitations of collecting and interpreting data from the perspectives of the social sciences with an emphasis on surveys, experimental designs and observational techniques as used in a variety of human service agencies. Prerequisite: ND.SS214.

ND.SS-TUT   ND.SS Teaching Assistant (Variable; Variable; 1.00-3.00 Credits) See catalog.

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