Catalog 2014-15

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Peace and Conflict Studies (PACS)

Department Website:

http://departments.juniata.edu/pacs/

Faculty:

Senior Fellows:

Background Information:

The Peace and Conflict Studies Program is directed and supported by The Baker Institute for Peace and Conflict Studies. The Program is an interdisciplinary inquiry into the human problems of war and deeply rooted conflict, and peace as a human potential. Courses in the PACS program systematically explore how and why humans resort to violence to resolve conflicts, and examines how peace and cooperation might be institutionalized through peacebuilding, conflict transformation and the study of human behavior and social institutions.

Special programs, facilities, or equipment:

Programs of Emphasis:

Examples of Student Designed Programs of Emphasis:

Secondary Emphasis:

Internship/Research Experiences:

Courses:

PACS-105   Introduction to Conflict Resolution (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) A survey of the field of conflict, this course explores the causes and consequences of social conflict. Theory and case studies are used to understand interpersonal disputes, the intricacies of groups in conflict and international issues and crisis. Emphasis is given to understanding the basic theoretical concepts of the field and developing basic conflict resolving skills.

PACS-108   Mediation (Spring; Yearly; 1.00-3.00 Credits; S) Students learn the basic model of mediation and the theoretical framework that guides its use. Role-plays and simulations will be used to prepare students to serve as mediators in a variety of contexts. Students will be trained to use a co-mediation model to resolve interpersonal and small group conflicts.

PACS-110   Introduction to Peace & Conflict Studies (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; I) A survey of the literature, issues and people that make up the field of Peace and Conflict Studies. The course looks at the language and the methodologies that have developed around the academic inquiry into war and deep-rooted conflict as human problems and peace as a human potential.

PACS-199   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows the department to offer topics not normally taught. Prerequisites vary by title.

PACS-202   Behavioral Analysis of Organizations (Either Semester; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; S,CW) (See EB202).

PACS-205   Conflict Intervention (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) The course explores the roles third parties play in managing and resolving conflicts. Students become familiar with both the central components of intervention design and the nature and structure of third party roles ranging from managers as mediators to conflict intervention in community disputes, or third party intervention in international disputes. The focusing questions of the course center on issues of how and when third parties can effectively and ethically intervene in conflicts productively. Research, case studies, and simulations are used to explore the answers of these questions and to increase students understanding of how third parties affect the course of conflict Prerequisites: PACS105

PACS-235   Tolstoy (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; CA,H,I,CW,CS) (See RU235).

PACS-239   Nuclear Threat (Spring; Variable; 4.00 Credits; CA,H,N,CW) This course examines the development and ramifications of nuclear weapons. Students will learn the basic physics upon which these devices operate, and explore moral issues that arose in the interactions of communities impacted by their construction, use and testing, including the perspective of scientists, government officials, and affected citizenry. Current concerns regarding nuclear weapons will be studied as well.

PACS-241   Dostoevsky (Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; I,H,S) Examines the writings of Dostoevsky in light of the social problems of his day and his personal search for truth and God in a world increasingly dominated by scientific materialism. Particular emphasis will be placed on Bakhtin's thesis that Dostoevsky invented a new form of the novel as well as on the darker sides of Dostoevsky's messianism and possible anti-semitism.

PACS-275   Art and Activism in Latin America (Fall; Variable; 3.00 Credits; H,I,CS) This course will study art-understood in a generic sense to include the visual arts, literature, film and music-that denounces social injustice and seeks to trigger fundamental reforms in Latin American societies. Known as arte comprometido or committed art in Latin America, the texts that will be analyzed treat topics such as political violence, economic exploitation, racism, and machismo. The class will be conducted in Spanish. Prerequisites: SP210.

PACS-281   Model United Nations (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S,I) In this course students analyze and critique global governance systems, with a focus on the United Nations. They also research specific countries and U.N. committees as well as compete in a collegiate level Model United Nations competition in Washington D.C.. Students plan and facilitate the high school conference that the Juniata College Model UN association organizes in the Fall. Students may fill this role in a variety of ways (i.e. chairmen, assistants, technology, administrative). Students in this course must also pay a fee to help cover the cost of attending the conference. Students in this course must also pay a fee to help cover the cost of attending the conference.

PACS-282   Model United Nations (Fall; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; S,I) Students research specific countries and U.N. committees as well as compete in a collegiate level Model United Nations competition in Washington D.C.. Students plan and facilitate the high school conference that the Juniata College Model UN association organizes in the Fall. Students may fill this role in a variety of ways (i.e. chairmen, assistants, technology, administrative). Students in this course must also pay a fee to help cover the cost of attending the conference. Prerequisite: PACS281.

PACS-283   Model United Nations (Fall; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; S,I) Students will fill leadership positions in preparing for both the National MUN and Juniata's High School MUN competitions. Students also research specific countries and U.N. committees as well as compete in a collegiate level Model United Nations competition in Washington D.C.. Students plan and facilitate the high school conference that the Juniata College Model UN association organizes in the Fall. Students may fill this role in a variety of ways (i.e. chairmen, assistants, technology, administrative). Students in this course must also pay a fee to help cover the cost of attending the conference. Prerequsites: PACS281 and PACS282.

PACS-284   Model United Nations (Fall; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; S,I) Students will fill leadership roles in creating research briefs on assigned countries, as well as chairing committees for planning and executing the High School Model United Nations. Students also research specific countries and U.N. committees as well as compete in a collegiate level Model United Nations competition in Washington D.C.. Students plan and facilitate the high school conference that the Juniata College Model UN association organizes in the Fall. Students may fill this role in a variety of ways (i.e. chairmen, assistants, technology, administrative). Students in this course must also pay a fee to help cover the cost of attending the conference. Prerequisites: PACS281 and PACS282 and PACS283.

PACS-299   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) An examination of an area of study not regularly included in departmental offerings. Prerequisites vary with topics.

PACS-300   Anthropology of War & Peace (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) A study of the incidence and nature of cooperation, competition, and conflict in human cultures. Evidence will be drawn from archaeological, ethnological and ethological data. Prerequisite: AN151 or PACS110.

PACS-305   Gender and Conflict (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S,I,CW) Examines how an understanding of gender issues is critical to understanding, assessing, and effectively addressing many conflicts. The course takes an interdisciplinary look at conflicts ranging from the differing experiences of women and men in conflict to interconnections between masculinity, femininity, security and warfare. An analysis of the ways in which gender issues cause and escalate conflicts is paired with discussions of how to address, challenge wage and/or resolve gendered conflicts. Prerequisites: Sophomore, Junior, or Senior standing.

PACS-306   The American Revolution (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; H) See HS305

PACS-308   Nonviolence: Theory & Practice (Either Semester; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S,H,CW) A study of the theory and practice of non-violence, this course explores both the theoretical development of nonviolence and the use of nonviolence as a means for waging and resolving conflict. The course explores nonviolence theory as it applies to issues of social change, alternative defense, and personal transformation, using writings from political, sociological, feminist, religious and philosophical perspectives. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing recommended.

PACS-311   20th Century American Wars (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; H) (See HS311)

PACS-323   Social Violence in Latin America (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; H,I) (see HS323)

PACS-332   International Law & Human Rights (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S,I) (See PS332)

PACS-335   Tolstoy (Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; CA,H,I,CW,CS) (See RU335)

PACS-340   Dostoevsky (Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H,I,CS) (See RU340)

PACS-348   Contemporary Latin America (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; H,I) (See HS348)

PACS-375   Art and Activism in Latin America (Fall; Variable; 3.00 Credits; H,I,CS) This course will study art-understood in a generic sense to include the visual arts, literature, film and music-that denounces social injustice and seeks to trigger fundamental reforms in Latin American societies. Known as arte comprometido or committed art in Latin America, the texts that will be analyzed treat topics such as political violence, economic exploitation, racism, and machismo. The class will be conducted in Spanish. Prerequisites: SP250 or SP255 or by permission of the instructor.

PACS-379   Bargaining and Conflict Management (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S,CS) Bargaining and Conflict Management provides students with an opportunity to learn about bargaining and conflict management theory. Students will have the opportunity to explore and apply this theory, and to examine aspects of bargaining style, in a variety of bargaining simulations. The course will also have an international component by utilizing international bargaining simulations as an instructional tool. Prerequisite: EB202 or PACS202.

PACS-399   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows the department to offer special topics not normally offered. Departments may offer more than one special topic. Prerequisites vary by title.

PACS-405   Conflict Transformation (Spring; Odd Years; 3.00 Credits; S,I,CW) Course explores the possibilities for achieving justice, reconciliation, and sustainable peace in societies where protracted ethnic and political conflicts have had a devastating impact economically, politically and socially. The course examines the root causes of such conflict and their impact on political structures and human community, along with strategies for moving forward towards coexistence and reconciliation. There is a particular focus on how the practices of peace building and conflict transformation seek to mobilize people and resources to transform unjust structures and relationships. Specific attention is given to the key issues of security, identity, justice and reconciliation. Prerequisites: PACS105 or PACS110 or PACS205 or permission of the instructor.

PACS-450   Senior Capstone (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S,H) Serves as a capstone experience asking students to synthesize material from PACS courses. Students will work collaboratively on a faculty student research project, conducting research for the literature review, analyzing and interpreting data and presenting findings in a final paper. Prerequisites: 18 credits of PACS courses or permission of the instructor.

PACS-455   PACS Honors Thesis (Fall; Yearly; 3.00-6.00 Credits; H) Designed to serve as a capstone for students who emphasize PACS in their POE. The student will be expected to produce a major research paper which examines in depth a topic, theme, issue, or problem that has served as an area of special interest for the student throughout the previous two years of study. Prerequisite is Senior standing. PACS105 and PACS110 and a minimum of 4 200+ level PACS courses.

PACS-465   Self,Identity, & Conflict (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) This course explores the socially constructed nature of the Self, as well as its concrete and historical manifestation within the economic and political transformations that have occurred since the middle ages. Issues explored include the historical development of the Self, national identity, and the way identities are deployed in violent conflicts and war. Prerequisites:PACS105 and PACS110 and Junior or Senior standing. Sophomores require permission of the instructor.

PACS-490   Peace & Conflict Studies Internship (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 2.00-9.00 Credits; I) An opportunity which requires students to relate theory and practice to a working environment and to reflect upon that experience. Students are supervised by the Washington Center and placed in a Washington office which deals directly with peace and/or international relations issues. Corequisite: PACS 495. Prerequisite: Permission and Jr. or Sr. Standing.

PACS-495   PACS Intern.Res.Sem. (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 2.00-6.00 Credits; I) Requires students to reflect on the internship experience and/or pursue research related to the placement. Corequisite: PACS490. Prerequisite: permission.

PACS-TUT   PACS Teaching Assistant (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits; S) See catalog

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