Catalog 2014-15

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Politics (PS)

Department Website:

http://departments.juniata.edu/politics/

Faculty:

Background Information:

Politics is among the oldest of the Western liberal arts. It traces its origins to Greek city-states of the classical period, and specifically to the city of Athens and the figure of Socrates. Even today, Socrates’ tragic confrontation with the authority of the city informs Western ideas of individualism and community. Politics is everywhere in human life, and this department takes a comprehensive view of its subject matter. Juniata’s Politics Department provides professional training within a liberal arts framework. We prepare students for careers in government, business, journalism, and many other fields as well as graduate school or law school.

Special programs, facilities, or equipment:

Programs of Emphasis:

Student Designed Programs of Emphasis:

Secondary Emphasis:

Internship/Research Experiences:

Courses:

PS-101   Introduction to American Government (Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; S) An introduction to the theory and practice of American government. The course surveys the underlying structure of American politics, its economic, cultural and legal foundations and the daily practice of politics, e.g. groups, parties, and the mass media. Students are asked to develop an account of American politics and to assess the principal features of political life in the United States according to the standards they have framed.

PS-102   Introduction to International Politics (Fall; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; S,I) Analyzes the principles and practice of international relations and the foreign policy of the United States, political, diplomatic, military and economic.

PS-122   Politics in Literature (Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; H,S) An introduction to the themes and analytical framework of political philosophy through a careful reading of works of literature. Such political themes as the relation of the individual to society, gender issues and the legitimation of authority will be addressed.

PS-196   Politics of Race and Gender (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S) This course examines the politics of race and gender as they relate to American politics. It examines how citizens and politicians are influenced by race and gender when formulating political attitudes, participating in elections, and formulating public policy. This class entails considerable student participation and discussion of contemporary political events.

PS-199   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows the departments to offer special topics not normally offered. Departments may offer more than one special topic. Prerequisites vary by title.

PS-206   The Culture War (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; CA,S) Some believe that American society is divided against itself in a culture war over the definition and application of American culture to public policy. In this cultural conflict, traditionalists are pitted against progressives in a struggle over the core values of American society. This clash is manifested inpublic policy debates about issues including abortion, school prayer, gay rights, stem-cell research, medical marijuana, and school choice. This course examines the evidence for the existence of a Culture War in American Politics. It explores the extent to which these two subgroups of American society are battling to define! American political culture and how these groups use their preferred definition of American culture to influence public policy. This summer course is an on-line course and will be accessed through Moodle. (You do NOT need to be on campus to take this course). All assignments will be completed via the Internet.

PS-216   State & Local Government (Spring; Even Years; 3.00 Credits; S) Examines the organization, operation, and problems of American state and urban governments. Emphasis is placed on the services these governments provide. , the conflicts they may manage, and the major economic and political trends affecting America's state and local governments. Prerequisite: PS101.

PS-218   Public Policy & Admin. (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) An introduction to the study of public policy and its administration. The course explores the ways which power, knowledge and institutions shape adoption and evolution of public policies in western democracies. Focusing on various policy areas, the course also surveys the public bureaucracies that administer these policies, examining what government agencies do and why they do it, and assesses alternatives to public bureaucracies. Prerequisite: PS101.

PS-221   American Political Thought (Fall; Variable; 4.00 Credits; H,CW) Reviews the development of political thought in America from the pre-Revolutionary period to the present. The course focus is on the analysis of primary sources, such as the Federalist Papers. Special attention is given to the tension between equality and individual liberty in our democratic system. Prerequisite: PS101 or PS102.

PS-222   Western Political Thought (Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H,S) Surveys selected works of political philosophers from Plato to Nietzsche. The course will focus on enduring questions of political thought including the nature of the good life and the best regime, the relationship between freedom and authority, and the tension between liberty and equality. Prerequisites: PS101 or PS102.

PS-230A   Political Party Conventions (Variable; Variable; 1.00-2.00 Credits; S) This course is an experiential education opportunity that takes place in the city that hosts either the Democratic National Convention or the Republican National Convention. It takes place every four years during presidential election years in the late summer or early fall. Each student decides whether he or she wishes to attend the program associated with the Democratic Party or the Republican Party. It is an intense, two-week seminar that features presentations by leading academics and practitioners about the presidential election, including the nomination campaign, the national party conventions, and the general election. The seminar also features site visits, fieldwork assignments, and small group discussions focused on these experiences and the course readings. The seminar culminates in the public events that comprise the Democratic National Convention or the Republican National Convention. Requires consent of the instructor and pre-payment of required course fees.

PS-230B   Presidential Inauguration (Spring; Variable; 1.00 Credit; S) This course is an experiential education opportunity that takes place in Washington, D.C. every four years during the inauguration of the president. It is an intense, 10-day seminar that features presentations by leading academics and practitioners about the presidency and presidential elections; site visits to embassies, government agencies, think tanks, media outlets, etc.; and small group discussions focused on these experiences and the course readings. The seminar culminates in the public events that comprise the presidential inauguration. Requires consent of the instructor and pre-payment of required course fees.

PS-230C   Inside Washington, D.C. (Spring; Variable; 1.00-2.00 Credits; S) This course is an experiential education opportunity that takes place in Washington, D.C. It is an intense, two-week seminar that features presentations by leading academics and practitioners about politics and the media, congressional elections, and presidential/congressional relations. The seminar includes site visits to embassies, government agencies, think tanks, media outlets, etc. with the aim of providing first-hand opportunities to witness government decision-making in action, as well as the efforts others on The Hill who try to influence government outcomes. The seminar also includes small group discussions focused on these experiences and the course readings and, when available, participation in the public events that comprise the swearing-in of the newly elected Congress. Requires consent of the instructor and pre-payment of required course fees.

PS-230D   Top Secret (Summer; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; S) This course is an experiential education opportunity that takes place in Washington, D.C. It is an intense, week-long academic seminar. Students explore the inner workings of the U.S. national security landscape with nationally recognized journalists, politicians, political analysts, and scholars as your guides. The course expands knowledge of American and international politics through on-site visits to such places as Capitol Hill, executive agencies, embassies, think tanks, and media organizations. Students engage in and network with nationally and internationally recognized public officials and business professionals to develop a sense of civic engagement and enhance leadership skills. Requires consent of the instructor and may require pre-payment of required course fees.

PS-241   European Politics (Spring; Odd Years; 3.00 Credits; S,I) Examines the modern history, political culture, institutions and policies of the major West European states. Britain, France, West Germany and the European Communities are compared along with selected other countries. The major problems confronting these are highlighted. Prerequisite: PS101 or PS102.

PS-242   Politics of Developing Nations (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S,I) Draws an analytical framework and provides an in-depth study of political, economic and social development in non-western societies. Selected countries or groups of countries from Asia, the Middle East and Africa are used as case studies. Prerequisites: PS102 or permission.

PS-243   U.S. Foreign Policy (Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S,I) Examines U.S. Foreign Policy from the Monroe Doctrine to the New World Order. Special emphasis is given to the tension between isolationism and globalism in this century. The course will focus on contemporary issues such as: the relationship with the UN, the U.S. as a global policeman, and the role of human rights as an American priority. Prerequisite: PS102.

PS-249   Senegambia I (Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; I,S) This course will meet 1 hour per week in spring semester. A requirement of the course is to participate in a three week summer trip to West Africa. During the spring semester we will examine the history and contemporary politics and economics of the Senegambia region. At the conclusion of the spring semester we will spend 3 weeks exploring the political culture and society of the Gambia and Senegal in West Africa. There is a fee for the trip to Africa. Corequisite: PS250.

PS-250   Senegambia II (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; CA,I,S) See PS249. Corequisite: PS249. Students must complete PS249 and PS250 to receive CA credit. A course fee is applied.

PS-289   Politics and the Media (Fall; Variable; 4.00 Credits; S,CW) This course has two components. First, it looks at the interaction of politics and the media in the context of the United States. Students will learn about how politicians use the media and about how the media covers politics. Second, it is designed to help students hone their research and writing skills. The class involves extensive class discussion, applications of course materials to contemporary coverage of American politics in the media, and instruction about research and writing. Students will be required to pay close attention to the interaction of politics and the media during the course of the semester.

PS-299   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Offers supplements to the regular departmental program, exploring topics and areas not regularly scheduled. Note: Students may take each ST: course for credit.

PS-2YR   Completion of Two Years At: Participating International Programs: Muenster, Lille, Bockholt, Lincoln, Marburg (Variable; Variable; 45.00 Credits)

PS-305   Politics in Film (Fall; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H,F) This course is designed as an introduction to the study of political ideas as presented in motion pictures. We will look both at the direct representation of political ideas or points of view (especially through satire), and at the way Hollywood has shaped our ideas about the political process. Because film is very much a 20th century medium, we will look with special care at the two defining political events of this century, the crisis of Western democracy following World War I, and the Cold War.

PS-311   Constitutional Interpretation: Powers of Government (Fall; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H) An examination of the three branches of government, their constitutional powers, and the limitations on those powers as interpreted by Supreme Court. Special attention is given to the areas of delegated and concurrent powers. The operation of the Supreme Court and the Federal court system are also reviewed. Prerequisites: PS101 or permission.

PS-312   Constitutional Interpretation: Civil Rights (Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H,CW) Examines citizen's rights and liberties which the Constitution protects against infringement by the government. Those freedoms enumerated in the Bill of Rights are reviewed as well as the right to privacy, due process, and equal protection. Prerequisites: PS101 or permission.

PS-313   Congress and Presidency (Fall; Odd Years; 4.00 Credits; S,CW) Examines the intellectual and constitutional foundations of Congress and the Presidency, and the evolution of their powers and responsibilities. The course also explores how, through cooperation and confrontation, the institutions make decisions about war and peace, spending, and taxation. Prerequisite: PS101.

PS-318   Parties, Elections & Campaigns (Fall; Even Years; 3.00 Credits; S) Examines the role political parties and elections play in democratic theory and practice in the U.S. Topics include party systems in the U.S., history, party organization, comparisons with parties in other countries, electoral competition, and elite mass linkages. Contemporary issues such as campaign finance, campaign strategy, and the role of the mass media are also explored. Prerequisite: PS101.

PS-320   TPJ: Political Philosophy/Jurisprudence (Fall; Variable; 3.00 Credits; H) Examines specific topics in the area of political philosophy and law. Topics will include " Foundations of American Constitutionalism, " " African-American Social and Political Thought, " " Liberalism, " and " Shakespeare's Politics. " Students may take each course for credit.

PS-323   State Legislative Process (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) A study of the State Legislative and Legislative Process. Students will examine the State Legislature as an institution in all of its aspects and those factors which comprise and affect the legislative process. The course requires the written analysis of actual legislation and the drafting of legislative proposals. Prerequisite: PS101.

PS-330   TPP: Topics in Public Policy (Fall; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S) Examines the formation and implementation of public policy by an in-depth focus on a single policy area. The course will investigate a particular policy area for the semester, such as environmental policy or health care policy. Policy study will include analysis of interest groups, public opinion, congressional committees and federal agencies. Research and analytical exercise will be emphasized. Prerequisite: PS101.

PS-332   International Law & Human Rights (Fall; Odd Years; 3.00 Credits; S,I,CW) A study of the historical evolution of International Law and its role and importance in the international system. In addition, the course will examine the issue of human rights, and the political factors that affect the extent to which human rights can be defined and protected by the international community. Prerequisite: PS102. (A Peace and Conflict Studies course).

PS-340   Topics in International Politics (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S,I) Examines international politics in light of a specific topic or issue. The topics include themes such as: Global Environmental Politics, Nationalism, and Competing World Ideologies.

PS-346   African Politics (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; I,S,CW) This course examines some of the factors that explain the political problems that plague Africa. Topics include: colonialism, human rights, corruption, ethnicity and pan-Africanism. Prerequisite: PS102.

PS-348   Contemporary Latin America (Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S,I) (See HS348)

PS-349   Senegambia III (Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; I,S) This course will meet 1 hour per week in spring semester. A requirement of the course is to participate in a three week summer trip to West Africa. During the spring semester we will examine the history and contemporary politics and economics of the Senegambia region. At the conclusion of the spring semester we will spend 3 weeks exploring the political culture and society of the Gambia and Senegal in West Africa. There is a fee for the trip to Africa. Corequisite: PS350. If PS249 and PS250 are completed they will count as CA. PS349/350 will not.

PS-350   Senegambia IV (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; I,S) See PS249. Corequisite: PS349. Students must complete PS249 and PS250 to receive CA credit. A course fee is applied.

PS-389   TWC: Washington Special Topics (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00-4.00 Credits) This course is for students participating in the Washingon Center's internship program in Washington, D.C. Each student will select one of several courses offerred by the Washington Center upon acceptance into the program. The title of this Special Topics course will vary according to the course the student enrolls in through the Washington Center.

PS-399   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Offers supplements to the regular departmental program, exploring topics and areas not regularly scheduled. Examples include Religious Revivalism in the Third World, Race, Religion and Gender in American politics and Nationalism in Europe. Note: abbreviated ST:(Title); students may take each ST: course for credit.

PS-490   Legal & Public Affairs Internship (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 2.00-9.00 Credits; S) An opportunity to apply concepts and theories learned in class and readings to a practical situation. Selected students work with chief administrative officers in State College and Huntingdon, police departments, environmental departments, legal offices or in the Court House. Note: may be repeated up to a total of 9 hours credit. Corequisite: PS495. Prerequisite: permission and Jr. or Sr. Standing.

PS-491   Washington Interns (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 2.00-9.00 Credits; S) See the chapter, " Special Programs " in the catalog under " Internships. " Corequisite: PS495. Prerequisite: permission.

PS-492   Harrisburg Legislative Interns (Spring; Yearly; 2.00-9.00 Credits; S) A unique opportunity to experience the legislative process. Placements are made to the research staffs of various committees (e.g., Banking and Commerce, Education, Judiciary, Local Government and Urban Affairs) of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives. Committees are selected on the basis of student interests and needs in the Legislature. Corequisite: PS495. Prerequisite: Permission and Sophomore, Junior or Senior standing.

PS-495   Politics Res/Seminar (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 2.00-6.00 Credits; S) Required of all students holding internships. The emphasis is on readings and discussions of materials relevant to the intern ship experience, e.g., professional behavior, ethical conduct, confidentiality, etc. Students produce a major research paper on a topic selected by the student in conjunction with the internship supervisor and the course instructor. Note: may be repeated up to a total of 6 hours credit. Corequisite: PS490 or PS491 or PS492. Prerequisite: permission.

PS-497   Honors Research I (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Designed to offer exceptional students the opportunity to engage in an extensive undergraduate thesis or research project. Selected students will be invited by the faculty of the department to propose a subject of special interest to the students; working closely with at least one member of the department, students will develop and complete a research project in the first semester and present the results as a publishable paper in the second. Available by permission.

PS-498   Honors Research II (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Designed to offer exceptional students the opportunity to complete the research paper started in PS497. Prerequisite: PS497.

PS-499   Senior Seminar (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Intended as a capstone experience in the discipline and designed to engage students in their final year in the comprehensive study of a major question or issue confronting the discipline of political science. Prerequisites: PS101 or PS102 or PS122 and senior standing and three additional Political Science courses or departmental permission.

PS-TUT   Political Science Teaching Assistant (Variable; Variable; 1.00-3.00 Credits; S) See Tutorial in the catalog.

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