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Juniata Hosts Author of Book on High Cost of College Education

(Posted October 15, 2012)

HUNTINGDON, Pa. -- As college tuition costs continue to increase without any sign of slowing, many parents and students are questioning the feasibility and practicality of higher education. Robert Archibald, co-author of the book "Why Does College Cost So Much," will set the record straight during his lecture at 7:30 p.m., Friday, Oct. 26, in Neff Lecture Hall in the von Leibig Center for Science on the Juniata campus.

This talk is free and open to the public.

The book "Why Does College Cost So Much," attempts to redefine how the American public views the cost of college by examining how increased economic growth contributes to the rising price of tuition, and by highlighting the higher demand and wages for workers with a college degree. The authors challenge the higher education community and prospective students to accept a different connotation for the word "affordability," and emphasize the need for students and prospective students to be active in the pursuit of financial aid.

Archibald is currently a chancellor professor of economics, and teaches courses in macroeconomics and statistics, and a seminar in behavioral economics at William and Mary College in Williamsburg, Va.

During the '96-'97 academic year, Archibald served as the college's Interim Dean of the Faculty of the Arts and Sciences, and between 1986 and 1991, he chaired William and Mary's economics department.

The authors challenge the higher education community and prospective students to accept a different connotation for the word "affordability," and emphasize the need for students and prospective students to be active in the pursuit of financial aid.

Archibald started his career with the Bureau of Labor Statistics in 1974.
Archibald has published a wide variety of research articles, and has received research grants and fellowships from NASA, the Virginia Department of Education, James City County, and National Technical Information Service.

In the past, Archibald predominantly researched macroeconomic principals and focused on the effects of irrational behavior on the microeconomic foundations of macroeconomics. More recently, he has begun focusing his research on issues of higher education.

Archibald received a bachelor's degree in economics from the University of Arizona in Tucson, Ariz., and received a master's and doctoral degree in economics from Purdue University in West Lafayette, Ind.

Written by: Erin Kreischer, media relations intern

Contact John Wall at wallj@juniata.edu or (814) 641-3132 for more information.