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Biology Student from Portage, Pa. Receives Research Fellowship

(Posted February 18, 2013)

Andrew J. Maul, a biology student from Portage, Pa., received a research fellowship from the Howard Hughes medical institute

HUNTINGDON, Pa. -- Andrew J. Maul, a junior from Portage, Pa., at Juniata College studying biology, was recently awarded an Exceptional Research Opportunities Program award from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, which will provide him with a summer research fellowship with a HHMI scientist in 2013.

Maul, the son of Jeff and Karen Maul of Portage, Pa., is a 2010 graduate of Portage Area High School.

The Exceptional Research Opportunities Program, started in 2003, selects motivated undergraduate students from groups traditionally underrepresented in the sciences or from disadvantaged backgrounds for outstanding summer research experiences that encourage them to pursue academic careers in science.
"The individualized education you get at Juniata is extremely valuable, especially for learning skills at the undergraduate level that translate into success at the graduate level," Maul says.

In the coming weeks, Maul will be matched with an HHMI scientist. HHMI scientists carry out cutting-edge research at universities, research institutes and medical centers throughout the United States.

The award also provides transportation and housing costs, as well as a $4,500 stipend. Students who participate in the program also are eligible for HHMI Gilliam Fellowships if they choose to pursue graduate education.

"The individualized education you get at Juniata is extremely valuable, especially for learning skills at the undergraduate level that translate into success at the graduate level."
Andrew J. Maul, junior


Maul has been involved in undergraduate research at Juniata since fall semester 2012. He works with Regina Lamandella, assistant professor of biology, on a project Lamandella started at Berkeley National Lab in Berkeley, Calif. that examines insulin-resistant individuals and whether a resistant starch diet (foods that are more difficult to digest) will change how the bacteria in the gut may function.

The Juniata junior also participated in an internship in summer 2012 with the Mentoring in Medicine program at Conemaugh Memorial Medical Center, in Johnstown. Pa. He shadowed 14 different specialists during a 10-week internship.

On campus, Maul remains active in student activities, including membership in the Health Occupations Students of America, or HOSA Future Health Professionals and Colleges Against Cancer.

Contact John Wall at wallj@juniata.edu or (814) 641-3132 for more information.