Sustainability

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Involved Faculty

Dr. Jamie White

Dr. Jamie White, professor of physics at Juniata, and his family have taken considerable measures to reduce their impact on the environment. As proponents of the 3 Rs (Reduce-Recycle-Reuse) the family has invested in a hybrid vehicle and geothermal heating for their home. They support Huntingdon's farmer's market, compost and grow some of their own produce. The Whites also take sustainability into account when making home improvements, and Laura White, Jamie's wife, has insulated their window blinds to reduce draft and cut back on energy usage.

The Whites also reduce waste by using their own cloth shopping bags, and reusing plastic sandwich bags, "until they have holes in them" according to Jamie. The family is also involved in their church's sustainability circle, and tries to get the community involved in different sustainable practices. Understanding that changing one's ways to be more sustainable can be more expensive, Jamie says "it isn't a luxury for everyone. If you can afford it, you should."

Dr. David Reingold

Dr. David Reingold, professor of chemistry and chair of the department, has made a conscious effort to be sustainable both at home and at work. He recycles, purchases organic, fair trade coffee, and walks whenever he can to reduce dependency on his vehicle. Dave supports Huntingdon's local farmer's market, composts, and has put in compact flourescents in some areas of his home. The family is looking for a more fuel efficient vehicle, and have also installed programmable thermostat in their house to cut back on energy usage.

The Reingolds also have a variable restrictor valve on their shower, which lets them reduce water flow to a trickle to save water. When asked if being environmentally conscious has made his life more difficult, Dave replied "it might be more expensive and a little less convenient, but it is definitely worth it. We believe if we, and other people do these things, many people will be better off."

Andy Dudash

Andy Dudash, Head of Reference Services at Juniata's Beeghly Library, and his wife Janine incorporate sustainable actions into their everyday lives. The two are part of a food co-op, which supplies them with organic and local food and health care products each month. Andy and Janine also support the Huntingdon farmer's market, as well as growing some produce themselves, and maintaining a compost pile. Andy, a craftsman in his spare time, has also decided to only use native woods in his building projects, like Black Locust, which is locally harvested, and is naturally rot resistant and needs no chemical treatment.

At home, Andy and Janine recycle, take reusable cloth bags for grocery shopping, and use "green" cleaners available through their co-op. They have also decided to use cloth diapers for their future children, and plan on installing a masonry heater in their next home. Andy says that "with everything you do it is important to understand the impact, both positive and negative. By recognizing that, you can improve on the negatives and build on the positive."

Dr. Grace Fala

Dr. Grace Fala, professor of Communications, has also made an effort to make her home sustainable. By heating her house solely from a highly efficient wood burning stove, she does not rely on oil or gas, and reduces her emissions into the atmosphere. She also uses wood from her property that she has cut herself to heat her home, understanding that naturally fallen trees serve as a great habitat for woodland creatures. Grace also composts all of her "extra" food items, but only after offering them to her various pets, including horses, rabbits, cats and chickens. Not only does she reduce the amount of food bought to feed her animals, but she also improves their quality of life by offering them more a more natural source of food. When asked why she practices sustainability, Grace replied that "to witness the poetry of nature and to be apart of it, it is very easy to be sustainable."

Sustainability Team