MUSEUM STUDIES CORE

Take the following courses:

AH-108  Cross Cultural Art 1

This course will examine art from around the world produced between the prehistoric era and the 14th century. We will consider perspectives for understanding cross-cultural encounters, examine the impact of cultural exchange on the development of art, and emphasize the historical and global context of various artistic movements and artists.

4 CreditsF,I,SW-GE Pre-Req or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109

MM-390  Museum Studies

This course will provide a broad introduction to the field of museum work. Students will be introduced to the field of museum studies by looking at the history, philosophy, role, operation and multiple functions of museums in American society. Students will examine the political, social, business, legal and ethical issues that confront museum professionals. By the end of the semester students should be able to identify and apply a range of techniques, tools and material used in museum work, and critically discuss issues related to exhibition, education, collections management, and conservation, among other topics. 

3 CreditsF,S

MM-392  Museum Education 

This course will study the history, theory, and practice of museum education. The class combines lectures, round table discussions, and design strategies for successful museum education programs for a variety of audiences. Students implement their learned skills through a series of programs that they design and implement for pre-selected groups.

3 CreditsF

MM-394  Curatorial Studies

In this seminar-style course, students will examine the history & theory of the curatorial discipline and the role of the work of a contemporary curator. We will consider the ways in which curators work as researchers, collaborators, artists, and social activists while developing and implementing exhibitions, and we will discuss issues of ethics, collecting, documentation, communication, scholarly research, and presentation.

3 CreditsF

MM-480  Museum Practicum I

Provides a select number of students with an opportunity to organize, design, handle, and install exhibitions hosted by the Juniata College Museum of Art. Students will learn the mechanics of curatorial work, as well as exhibition preparation documentation, promotion, and shipping. In addition to the hands-on aspect of the course, students will gain theoretical knowledge about curatorial work through a variety of reading and writing assignments. The course is designed to prepare students for internships at regional and national museums and for entrance into graduate programs in Museum Studies.

3 CreditsFPrerequisites: MM-390 or AR-390 and instructor permission.

MM-481  Museum Practicum II

Builds on skills acquired in Museum Practicum I. Provides further work experience and refines the student's curatorial skills. Students may be assigned independent projects as they relate to various aspects of scheduled exhibitions and will be responsible for helping instruct and assist the Museum Practicum I students. In addition to the hands-on aspect of the course, students will build on the theoretical knowledge gained in Practicum I through a variety of reading and writing assignments.

3 CreditsFPrerequisite: MM-480 or AR-480 and instructor permission.


ASSOCIATED COURSES

Take the following courses:

AR-104  Design and Color

The discipline of design is basic to all forms of visual art, including painting, drawing, photography, ceramics and illustration. This course is designed to acquaint the student with the basic elements of picture structure: composition, line, shape, value, texture, color, scale, proportion, tension, and balance. Note: A special fee for art supplies is assessed.

3 CreditsF,CTDH  

EN-272 Introduction to Professional Writing

This course covers the types of writing used in the professional and business world, with attention to deciding when to use which type, or whether to use writing at all. Also concentrates on effectively addressing different audiences. The course will also cover the use of graphics, from basic concepts through effective design and adjusting to audience and situation. 

4 CreditsH, CWPrerequisite: First-year or sophomore standing. Juniors and Seniors by instructor permission.


ART HISTORY COURSES

Take the following courses:

AH-113  Cross-Cultural Art 2

This course will examine art from around the world produced between the 14th century and the present. We will 1) consider perspectives for understanding cross-cultural encounters in an increasingly diverse and interconnected world and 2) emphasize the historical and global context of various artistic movements & artists.

4 CreditsF,I,SW-GE Pre-Req or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109 (NOTE: AR-108 Cross-Cultural Art 1 is NOT a prerequisite for this course.)

AH-492 Senior Thesis in Art History

Involves one full semester of research and writing. A thesis statement, bibliography, and outline are to be followed by a rough draft which is expected by mid-term. After revisions, the completed paper is due by the end of the semester. Students may choose to write about a specific work (or several works) of art, and relevant artists, styles, influences, etc. The thesis may be comparative, but it must be analytical.

3 CreditsF,CWInstructor permission required.

HS-493 The Historian's Craft

This course is a seminar-style introduction to historiography and a forum in which senior history students complete part or all of their senior thesis. Students taking the course are expected to work simultaneously with the course instructor, as well as a thesis advisor from within the history department. Students may select a member of the faculty outside the department as a secondary advisor if that complements their thesis topic. Students who elect to write a year-long thesis take HS496 in the Spring semester after taking HS493. Students from other departments who take the course will be expected to complete a paper of comparable length to a senior thesis under the supervision of the course instructor. 

3 CreditsH, CWPrerequisites: One 300 level history course and Senior status.


Take five of the following courses:

AH-301  African-American Art: Slavery to Social Justice

Considers the work of African-American artists from the American colonial period to the present, seeking to understand the works of painting, sculpture and other media as the products of major cultural movements such as the New Negro Movement, Harlem Renaissance, and Civil Rights Movement, but also as the unique expressions of individual artists.

4 CreditsF,I,CA,CW,SW-US Pre-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109

AH-302  Reframing American Art

This course will introduce you to the ways in which American visual arts articulate cross-cultural encounters, from times of diverse Native groups, through later engagements with European colonizers, American slaves, and immigrants. We will look at how the historical experience of different groups is shaped and how those experiences are translated into art produced by artists of varied backgrounds.

4 CreditsF,SW-US Pre-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109

AH-309  Expanding the Renaissance

The Baroque is a global style that appeared in various parts of the world in the 17th and 18th centuries. In this course, you will learn how styles developed/changed as a reaction to/against social, political, religious, economic, and aesthetic issues. You will compare monuments from different parts of the world to gain an understanding of local meaning and cross-cultural connections.

4 CreditsF,I,CW,WK-HTPre-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

AH-310  Global Baroque Art & Architecture

The Baroque is a global style that appeared in various parts of the world in the 17th and 18th centuries. In this course, you will learn how styles developed/changed as a reaction to/against social, political, religious, economic, and aesthetic issues. You will compare monuments from different parts of the world to gain an understanding of local meaning and cross-cultural connections.

4 CreditsF,I,CW,WK-HTPre-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

AH-311 Art of Ancient Peoples

Studies art and architecture from Prehistory through Ancient Rome, with particular emphasis on architecture and sculpture and their purpose in cultural and political activities. Course will draw from art historical and archaeological approaches.

4 CreditsF,I,WK-HTPre-req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

AH-312 Medieval Art: Really a Dark Age?

This course concentrates on the arts and architecture of Europe from 300 to 1250. Works are drawn from the late Antique, Byzantine, Migratory, Carolingian, Ottonian, Romanesque, and Gothic periods. Special emphasis on the relationship between religious, economic, social, and political forces and how they affected the arts of this era.

3 CreditsF,WK-HTPre-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

AH-316 Art & Revolution: 19th Century Europe

This course introduces major themes in 19th century European art, with an emphasis on French painting. We will consider revolutionary impacts on art; the Napoleonic presence abroad; the shift from history painting to realism; issues related to class and gender. Students will gain an understanding of the stylistic principles and historical contexts in which 19th-century art was created.

4 CreditsF,I,CS,WK-HTPre-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

AH-329  Impressionism to Abstract Expressionism

This course investigates artistic developments that shaped the rise of Modernism in Europe and the U.S. from the late 19th-mid 20th century. We will discuss various media and consider the ways in which artists responded to changing cultural conditions. Students will develop a critical understanding of the discipline of art history and acquire the skills necessary to interpret/analyze visual imagery.

4 CreditsF,I,CW,WK-HTPre-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

AH-330  Why Is That Art? 1945-Present

What makes something a work of art? Why do certain objects end up in museums? This course will answer those questions by surveying major artists and global movements from World War II through the present day. The impact of globalization on art and the predominance of socially engaged art in the 21st century will be considered.

4 CreditsF,I,WK-HTPre-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.


INTERNSHIP

Take the following courses for 0-5 credits. Internships can count for credit or as transcript notation. A second internship is strongly recommended.


AH-490 Internship

Students will work under the supervision and guidance of a faculty member or internship sponsor.

2-9 Credits

AH-495 Internship Research Seminar

See Internships in the catalog.

4-6 Credits


POE Credit Total = 55-60

Students must complete at least 18 credits at the 300/400-level.  Any course exception must be approved by the advisor and/or department chair.