Required Core

PS-101 Introduction to American Government
Variable; Yearly; 4 Credits; S; 
An introduction to the theory and practice of American government. The course surveys the underlying structure of American politics, its economic, cultural and legal foundations and the daily practice of politics, e.g. groups, parties, and the mass media. Students are asked to develop an account of American politics and to assess the principal features of political life in the United States according to the standards they have framed.  


PS-102 Introduction to International Politics
Variable; Yearly; 4 Credits; S, I; 
Analyzes the principles and practice of international relations and the foreign policy of the United States, political, diplomatic, military and economic.  


PS-222 Western Political Thought
Variable; Variable; 4 Credits; H, WK-HT; 
Surveys selected works of philosophers from Plato to Nietzsche. The course will focus on enduring questions -- what is the good, the nature of the best regime, how do freedom and authority intersect, and so on. Pre-Req or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109


PS-243 U.S. Foreign Policy
Variable; Variable; 3 Credits; S, I; 
Examines U.S. Foreign Policy from the Monroe Doctrine to the New World Order. Special emphasis is given to the tension between isolationism and globalism in this century. The course will focus on contemporary issues such as: the relationship with the UN, the U.S. as a global policeman, and the role of human rights as an American priority.  Prerequisite: PS102.


PS-334 Human Rights
Variable; Variable; 3 Credits; I, S; 
This class focuses on some of the debates concerning human rights: realism versus idealism; individualism versus communitarianism; universalism versus relativism; religious fundamentalism versus secularism; women's rights as human rights; liberalism versus socialism. We review the historical evolution of human rights. We devote part of the semester to the role of literature and the arts in creating and promoting human rights.  Prerequisite: PS102.


PS-499 Senior Seminar
Spring; Yearly; 3 Credits; S; 
Intended as a capstone experience in the discipline and designed to engage students in their final year in the comprehensive study of a major question or issue confronting the discipline of political science.  Prerequisites: PS101 or PS102 or PS222 and senior standing and three additional Political Science courses or departmental permission.


--OR--


IS-400  Senior Seminar in International Studies
Fall; Yearly; 3 Credits;  H,I ; 
This seminar provides students who have recently returned from study abroad with a common focus for the exchange of ideas about diverse international experiences. Annual topics will be chosen from international politics, literature, and culture. Intensive classroom discussions of the weekly readings will allow each student to contribute to the collective learning process, regardless of their individual areas of concentration.  Prerequisites: Senior standing, study abroad experience and IS104; or by permission of the instructor. 


IS-200  Politics & Culture of Modernization
Either Semester; Yearly; 4 Credits; IC; 
This course examines the process of globalization and modernization and the changing political and cultural ideas which have accompanied them. Using various media and materials from different cultures the questions of who we are, where we are and how we got here are explored.  Prerequisites: EN110 or EN109 and Sophomore, Junior or Senior standing. 


EB-105  International Economic Issues
Fall & Spring; Variable; 3 Credits; S,I; 
Understanding international economics is increasingly important for private and public decision-makers. In a world of growing economic interdependence, the ability of policy makers to provide a stable environment for business is a key issue. Accordingly, this course develops the principle topics of international economics, including trade theory, the balance of payments, the cause and consequences of exchange rate movements, the flow of capital, currency crises and regional trade issues. The applied topics emphasized will be based on the most pressing current issues.  


EB-381  International Political Economy
Spring; Yearly; 3 Credits; S,I; 
The pursuit of wealth and power, profit and privilege, corporate growth and national security occurs in a global context. This course examines the business agendas and political priorities that find expression in the policy agreements and institutional agreements of the contemporary global economy. The course is conducted as a seminar and requires a substantial research project.  Prerequisite: EB105. 


One of the following courses:

EB-222  Principles of Macroeconomics
Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3 Credits; S; 
Macroeconomic conditions affect individuals and businesses in numerous ways: employment opportunities, the purchasing power of wages and salaries, the cost of borrowing money, sales, profits, and competitiveness against foreign businesses. This course develops the theories relevant to understanding the business cycle, inflation, unemployment, deflation, exchange rates and balance of payments problems. It also examines the options and tradeoffs governments face as they seek to provide a stable macroeconomic environment through monetary and fiscal policies. Case studies of the macroeconomic performance and policies of diverse countries provide a comparative orientation.  Prerequisites: Sophomore, Junior, or Senior standing 

Other Requirements

Four additional upper level (300 or 400 level) courses (12 credits) in International Politics or International Studies.  With approval, students can also select appropriate international courses from other departments:*

Upper-level International Politics Courses:  

PS-334 Human Rights
Variable; Variable; 3 Credits; I, S; 
This class focuses on some of the debates concerning human rights: realism versus idealism; individualism versus communitarianism; universalism versus relativism; religious fundamentalism versus secularism; women's rights as human rights; liberalism versus socialism. We review the historical evolution of human rights. We devote part of the semester to the role of literature and the arts in creating and promoting human rights.  Prerequisite: PS102.


PS-335 Law of Nations
Variable; Variable; 3 Credits; I, S; 
This course explores the substance of modern international law. Course topics may include the Vienna Convention, the UN Charter, the Law of the Sea Convention, the Rome Statute, the International Court of Justice, and the International Criminal Court. The course also explores how nation states interact with these bodies under their internal laws and customary international law.  Prerequisite: PS 102.


PS-346 African Politics
Variable; Variable; 3 Credits; I, S, CW; 
This course examines some of the factors that explain the political problems that plague Africa. Topics include: colonialism, human rights, corruption, ethnicity and pan-Africanism.  Prerequisite: PS102.


PS-340 Topics in International Politics
Variable; Variable; 3 Credits; S, I; 
Examines international politics in light of a specific topic or issue. The topics include themes such as: Global Environmental Politics, Nationalism, and Competing World Ideologies.  


PS-389 TWC: Washington Special Topics
Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1-4 Credits;  ; 
This course is for students participating in the Washingon Center's internship program in Washington, D.C. Each student will select one of several courses offered by the Washington Center upon acceptance into the program. The title of this Special Topics course will vary according to the course the student enrolls in through the Washington Center.  


Upper-level International Studies Courses:

Any course with an IS prefix at the 300 or 400 level

Two semesters of Foreign Language above the 120 level = 6 credits or 14 credits if the student must take beginning instruction or 12 credits of Chinese language instruction for students spending the year in China.

At least one semester study abroad at a JC site

Total credit hours = 48-49 (excluding foreign language courses)