Students must complete at least 15 courses totaling at least 48 credits.*  Ten of these courses are specified below.  The remaining courses and credits can consist of any Politics course.  With the approval of your advisors, one of these remaining courses can be from a different department if that course has a clear connection to Politics.  No more than six credits of internships and no more than six credits of Mock Trial can be included in your POE.  A total of 18 credits must be at the 300-level or above.  The same course cannot be used to satisfy more than one POE requirement. 

Required Politics Core

PS-101 Introduction to American Government

An introduction to the theory and practice of American government. The course surveys the underlying structure of American politics, its economic, cultural and legal foundations and the daily practice of politics, e.g. groups, parties, and the mass media. Students are asked to develop an account of American politics and to assess the principal features of political life in the United States according to the standards they have framed.

VariableYearly4 CreditsS 


PS-102 Introduction to International Politics

Analyzes the principles and practice of international relations and the foreign policy of the United States, political, diplomatic, military and economic.

VariableYearly4 CreditsS, I 


PS-221 American Political Thought

Covers development of American Political Thought from the Revolution to the modern-day. Special attention is given to the tension between liberty and equality in our system, especially as those tensions are revealed in writings of women and African-American writers.

VariableVariable4 CreditsH, CW, SW-US 

 

OR

 

PS-222 Western Political Thought

Surveys selected works of philosophers from Plato to Nietzsche. The course will focus on enduring questions -- what is the good, the nature of the best regime, how do freedom and authority intersect, and so on.

VariableVariable4 CreditsH, WK-HTPre-Req or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109


PS-499 Senior Seminar

Intended as a capstone experience in the discipline and designed to engage students in their final year in the comprehensive study of a major question or issue confronting the discipline of political science. 

SpringYearly3 CreditsSPrerequisites: PS101 or PS102 or PS222 and senior standing and three additional Political Science courses or departmental permission.

 

OR

 

PS-497 Honors Research I

Designed to offer exceptional students the opportunity to engage in an extensive undergraduate thesis or research project. Selected students will be invited by the faculty of the department to propose a subject of special interest to the students; working closely with at least one member of the department, students will develop and complete a research project in the first semester and present the results as a publishable paper in the second. Available by permission.

FallYearly3 CreditsS 

 

+


PS-498 Honors Research II

Designed to offer exceptional students the opportunity to complete the research paper started in PS497. 

SpringYearly3 CreditsSPrerequisite: PS497.


Politics Electives

[8 courses, 24-35 credits] [13 courses, 38-49 credits total] 
Students take eight (8) additional (three or more credit) courses in Politics. 
They must take at least one elective in each subfield: American Politics and Policy; Political Philosophy and Jurisprudence; and International Politics. 
Internships totaling fewer than six credits will count as one course.  Internships totaling six or greater credits, will count as two courses (PS 490, 491, or 492, and PS 495, Internship Seminar). 
At least 15 credits of course work, excluding internships, must be at the 300 level or above. 

American Politics Elective (3 or 4 Credits)

Take one of the following courses:

PS-125 Citizenship

What do citizens owe to fellow citizens at the local, national, and global levels? This course contemplates this question by examining the role of citizens in civil society. It examines citizens' social responsibility to others. It fosters each citizen's sense of empathy toward other citizens (including toward citizens living in different circumstances or having different worldviews) by exploring the social contexts of public policy problems. Using ethical reasoning, citizens will understand the ethics of citizenship in different settings and traditions. Citizens will consider the ramifications of enacting alternative public policies on the wellbeing of fellow citizens and of civil society.

VariableVariable4 CreditsSW-ER 

 


PS-206 The Culture War

Is the U.S. at war with itself over core political and cultural values? This culture war is waged over hot-button policy issues including abortion, school prayer, gay rights, religion in politics, marijuana, immigration, and diversity. Students explore the complex political contexts that shape the lived experiences of traditionally marginalized groups and examine how power, privilege, and marginalization influence policy outcomes.

VariableVariable4 CreditsCA, S, SW-US 


PS-208 Policy and Community

In this course, students will engage in the policymaking process in Huntingdon. In conjunction with local policymakers, students will research a community problem and make policy recommendations based onthat research. Class discussions will focus on common community issues in America (such as environmental and healthcare problems) in addition to research methods and local policymaking processes.

VariableYearly4 CreditsSW-LEPrerequisite or corequisite: FYC or CWS


PS-218 Public Policy & Admin.

An introduction to the study of public policy and its administration. The course explores the ways which power, knowledge and institutions shape adoption and evolution of public policies in western democracies. Focusing on various policy areas, the course also surveys the public bureaucracies that administer these policies, examining what government agencies do and why they do it, and assesses alternatives to public bureaucracies.

VariableVariable3 CreditsSPrerequisite: PS101.


PS-313 Congress and Presidency

Examines the intellectual and constitutional foundations of Congress and the Presidency, and the evolution of their powers and responsibilities. The course also explores how, through cooperation and confrontation, the institutions make decisions about war and peace, spending, and taxation. 

VariableVariable4 CreditsS, CWPrerequisite: PS101.


PS-318 Parties, Elections & Campaigns

Examines the role political parties and elections play in democratic theory and practice in the U.S. Topics include party systems in the U.S., history, party organization, comparisons with parties in other countries, electoral competition, and elite mass linkages. Contemporary issues such as campaign finance, campaign strategy, and the role of the mass media are also explored. 

VariableVariable3 CreditsSPrerequisite: PS101.


PS-330 TPP: Topics in Public Policy

Examines the formation and implementation of public policy by an in-depth focus on a single policy area. The course will investigate a particular policy area for the semester, such as environmental policy or health care policy. Policy study will include analysis of interest groups, public opinion, congressional committees and federal agencies. Research and analytical exercise will be emphasized. 

VariableVariable3 CreditsSPrerequisite: PS101.


PS-389 TWC: Washington Special Topics

This course is for students participating in the Washingon Center's internship program in Washington, D.C. Each student will select one of several courses offered by the Washington Center upon acceptance into the program. The title of this Special Topics course will vary according to the course the student enrolls in through the Washington Center.

Fall & SpringYearly1-4 Credits  


Political Philosophy or Jurisprudence Elective  (3 or 4 credits)

Take one of the following courses:

PS-190A Mock Trial

A study of elements related to the preparation of a trial through the Mock Trial setting governed by the American Mock Trial Association. Students will learn the preparation of pleadings, applicable case law to the case presented, and obtain knowledge of the Rules of Evidence. Each year, Mock Trial is offered as PS-190A during the fall semester for 3 credits and PS-190B during the spring semester for 1 credit.

FallYearly3 CreditsCS 


PS-221 American Political Thought

Covers development of American Political Thought from the Revolution to the modern-day. Special attention is given to the tension between liberty and equality in our system, especially as those tensions are revealed in writings of women and African-American writers.

VariableVariable4 CreditsH, CW, SW-US 


PS-209 Sexual Politics

In this course, we will discuss the history of sex and gender in political theory and practice. In part one, we will discuss highlights of the history of gender politics in the United States. In part two, we will build on this knowledge by exploring what feminists have to say on important current topics, such as gendered violence and sexuality.

VariableVariable3 CreditsS 


PS-221 American Political Thought

Covers development of American Political Thought from the Revolution to the modern-day. Special attention is given to the tension between liberty and equality in our system, especially as those tensions are revealed in writings of women and African-American writers.

VariableVariable4 CreditsH, CW, SW-US 


PS-222 Western Political Thought

Surveys selected works of philosophers from Plato to Nietzsche. The course will focus on enduring questions -- what is the good, the nature of the best regime, how do freedom and authority intersect, and so on.

VariableVariable4 CreditsH, WK-HTPre-Req or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109


PS-305 Politics in Film

This course is designed as an introduction to the study of political ideas as presented in motion pictures. We will look both at the direct representation of political ideas or points of view (especially through satire), and at the way Hollywood has shaped our ideas about the political process. Because film is very much a 20th century medium, we will look with special care at the two defining political events of this century, the crisis of Western democracy following World War I, and the Cold War.

VariableVariable4 CreditsH, F 


PS-311 Constitutional Interpretation: Powers of Government

An examination of the three branches of government, their constitutional powers, and the limitations on those powers as interpreted by Supreme Court. Special attention is given to the areas of delegated and concurrent powers. The operation of the Supreme Court and the Federal court system are also reviewed. 

VariableVariable4 CreditsHPrerequisites: PS101 or permission.


PS-312 Constitutional Interpretation: Civil Rights

Examines citizen's rights and liberties which the Constitution protects against infringement by the government. Those freedoms enumerated in the Bill of Rights are reviewed as well as the right to privacy, due process, and equal protection.

VariableVariable4 CreditsH, CWPrerequisites: PS101 or permission.


PS-320 Topics Political Philos & Jurisprudence

Examines specific topics in the area of political philosophy and law. Topics will include " Foundations of American Constitutionalism, " " African-American Social and Political Thought, " " Liberalism, " and " Shakespeare's Politics. " Students may take each course for credit.

VariableVariable3 CreditsH 


PS-389 TWC: Washington Special Topics

This course is for students participating in the Washingon Center's internship program in Washington, D.C. Each student will select one of several courses offered by the Washington Center upon acceptance into the program. The title of this Special Topics course will vary according to the course the student enrolls in through the Washington Center.

Fall & SpringYearly1-4 Credits  


International Politics Elective (3 or 4 Credits)

Take one of the following courses:

PS-102 Introduction to International Politics

Analyzes the principles and practice of international relations and the foreign policy of the United States, political, diplomatic, military and economic.

VariableYearly4 CreditsS, I 


PS-241 European Politics

Examines the modern history, political culture, institutions and policies of the major West European states. Britain, France, West Germany and the European Communities are compared along with selected other countries. The major problems confronting these are highlighted.

VariableVariable3 CreditsS, IPrerequisite: PS101 or PS102.


PS-243 U.S. Foreign Policy

Examines U.S. Foreign Policy from the Monroe Doctrine to the New World Order. Special emphasis is given to the tension between isolationism and globalism in this century. The course will focus on contemporary issues such as: the relationship with the UN, the U.S. as a global policeman, and the role of human rights as an American priority. 

VariableVariable3 CreditsS, IPrerequisite: PS102.


PS-249 Senegambia I

These courses (PS249 and PS250) are co-requisites. In the fall semester, we study and discuss Gambia's history and contemporary politics and culture. During the winter break, we spend three weeks exploring the political culture and society of The Gambia. 

VariableVariable2 CreditsI, S, CA, SWGSACorequisite: PS250. Students must complete both PS249 and PS250 to receive CA credit. If you want to get Global Engagement credit, after returning from the trip you must complete a 1-credit course that has been approved by the Global Education Committee.

--AND--

PS-250 Senegambia II

These courses (PS249 and PS250) are co-requisites. In the fall semester, we study and discuss Gambia's history and contemporary politics and culture. During the winter break, we spend three weeks exploring the political culture and society of The Gambia. 

VariableYearly2 CreditsCA, I, S, SWGSACorequisite: PS250. Students must complete both PS249 and PS250 to receive CA credit. If you want to get Global Engagement credit, after returning from the trip you must complete a 1-credit course that has been approved by the Global Education Committee.


PS-334 Human Rights

This class focuses on some of the debates concerning human rights: realism versus idealism; individualism versus communitarianism; universalism versus relativism; religious fundamentalism versus secularism; women's rights as human rights; liberalism versus socialism. We review the historical evolution of human rights. We devote part of the semester to the role of literature and the arts in creating and promoting human rights. 

VariableVariable3 CreditsI, SPrerequisite: PS102.


PS-335 Law of Nations

This course explores the substance of modern international law. Course topics may include the Vienna Convention, the UN Charter, the Law of the Sea Convention, the Rome Statute, the International Court of Justice, and the International Criminal Court. The course also explores how nation states interact with these bodies under their internal laws and customary international law. 

VariableVariable3 CreditsI, SPrerequisite: PS 102.


PS-346 African Politics

This course examines some of the factors that explain the political problems that plague Africa. Topics include: colonialism, human rights, corruption, ethnicity and pan-Africanism. 

VariableVariable3 CreditsI, S, CWPrerequisite: PS102.


PS-340 Topics in International Politics

Examines international politics in light of a specific topic or issue. The topics include themes such as: Global Environmental Politics, Nationalism, and Competing World Ideologies.

VariableVariable3 CreditsS, I 


PS-389 TWC: Washington Special Topics

This course is for students participating in the Washingon Center's internship program in Washington, D.C. Each student will select one of several courses offered by the Washington Center upon acceptance into the program. The title of this Special Topics course will vary according to the course the student enrolls in through the Washington Center.

Fall & SpringYearly1-4 Credits  


Comparative Societies and Culture Elective (3 or 4 credits)

Take one of the following courses:

PS-241 European Politics

Examines the modern history, political culture, institutions and policies of the major West European states. Britain, France, West Germany and the European Communities are compared along with selected other countries. The major problems confronting these are highlighted.

VariableVariable3 CreditsS, IPrerequisite: PS101 or PS102.


PS-249 Senegambia I

These courses (PS249 and PS250) are co-requisites. In the fall semester, we study and discuss Gambia's history and contemporary politics and culture. During the winter break, we spend three weeks exploring the political culture and society of The Gambia. 

VariableVariable2 CreditsI, S, CA, SWGSACorequisite: PS250. Students must complete both PS249 and PS250 to receive CA credit. If you want to get Global Engagement credit, after returning from the trip you must complete a 1-credit course that has been approved by the Global Education Committee.

--AND--

PS-250 Senegambia II

These courses (PS249 and PS250) are co-requisites. In the fall semester, we study and discuss Gambia's history and contemporary politics and culture. During the winter break, we spend three weeks exploring the political culture and society of The Gambia. 

VariableYearly2 CreditsCA, I, S, SWGSACorequisite: PS250. Students must complete both PS249 and PS250 to receive CA credit. If you want to get Global Engagement credit, after returning from the trip you must complete a 1-credit course that has been approved by the Global Education Committee.


PS-346 African Politics

This course examines some of the factors that explain the political problems that plague Africa. Topics include: colonialism, human rights, corruption, ethnicity and pan-Africanism. 

VariableVariable3 CreditsI, S, CWPrerequisite: PS102.