POLITICS CORE


American, International:

Take the following courses:

PS-101 Introduction to American Government

An introduction to the theory and practice of American government. The course surveys the underlying structure of American politics, its economic, cultural and legal foundations and the daily practice of politics, e.g. groups, parties, and the mass media. Students are asked to develop an account of American politics and to assess the principal features of political life in the United States according to the standards they have framed.

4 CreditsS, WK-SI

PS-102 Introduction to International Politics

Analyzes the principles and practice of international relations and the foreign policy of the United States, political, diplomatic, military and economic.

4 CreditsS, I, SW-GE


Political Philosophy & Jurisprudence:

Take one of the following courses:

PS-221 American Political Thought

Covers development of American Political Thought from the Revolution to the modern-day. Special attention is given to the tension between liberty and equality in our system, especially as those tensions are revealed in writings of women and African-American writers.

4 CreditsH, CW, SW-US 

PS-222 Western Political Thought

Surveys selected works of philosophers from Plato to Nietzsche. The course will focus on enduring questions -- what is the good, the nature of the best regime, how do freedom and authority intersect, and so on.

4 CreditsH, WK-HTPre-Req or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109


AMERICAN POLITICS

Take one of the following courses: (PS-389, PS-199, PS-299 or PS-399 may fulfill requirement depending on specific topic of course)

PS-125 Citizenship

What do citizens owe to fellow citizens at the local, national, and global levels? This course contemplates this question by examining the role of citizens in civil society. It examines citizens' social responsibility to others. It fosters each citizen's sense of empathy toward other citizens (including toward citizens living in different circumstances or having different worldviews) by exploring the social contexts of public policy problems. Using ethical reasoning, citizens will understand the ethics of citizenship in different settings and traditions. Citizens will consider the ramifications of enacting alternative public policies on the wellbeing of fellow citizens and of civil society.

4 CreditsSW-ER

PS-206 The Culture War

Is the U.S. at war with itself over core political and cultural values? This culture war is waged over hot-button policy issues including abortion, school prayer, gay rights, religion in politics, marijuana, immigration, and diversity. Students explore the complex political contexts that shape the lived experiences of traditionally marginalized groups and examine how power, privilege, and marginalization influence policy outcomes.

4 CreditsCA, S, SW-US 

PS-208 Policy and Community

In this course, students will engage in the policymaking process in Huntingdon. In conjunction with local policymakers, students will research a community problem and make policy recommendations based onthat research. Class discussions will focus on common community issues in America (such as environmental and healthcare problems) in addition to research methods and local policymaking processes.

4 CreditsSW-LEPrerequisite or corequisite: FYC or CWS

PS-218 Public Policy & Admin.

An introduction to the study of public policy and its administration. The course explores the ways which power, knowledge and institutions shape adoption and evolution of public policies in western democracies. Focusing on various policy areas, the course also surveys the public bureaucracies that administer these policies, examining what government agencies do and why they do it, and assesses alternatives to public bureaucracies.

3 CreditsSPrerequisite: PS101.

PS-289 Politics and the Media

This course has two components. First, it looks at the interaction of politics and the media in the context of the United States. Students will learn about how politicians use the media and about how the media covers politics. Second, it is designed to help students hone their research and writing skills. The class involves extensive class discussion, applications of course materials to contemporary coverage of American politics in the media, and instruction about research and writing. Students will be required to pay close attention to the interaction of politics and the media during the course of the semester.

4 CreditsS, CWPrerequisites: PS101.

PS-313 Congress and Presidency

Examines the intellectual and constitutional foundations of Congress and the Presidency, and the evolution of their powers and responsibilities. The course also explores how, through cooperation and confrontation, the institutions make decisions about war and peace, spending, and taxation. 

4 CreditsS, CWPrerequisite: PS101.

PS-318 Parties, Elections & Campaigns

Examines the role political parties and elections play in democratic theory and practice in the U.S. Topics include party systems in the U.S., history, party organization, comparisons with parties in other countries, electoral competition, and elite mass linkages. Contemporary issues such as campaign finance, campaign strategy, and the role of the mass media are also explored. 

3 CreditsSPrerequisite: PS101.

PS-330 TPP: Topics in Public Policy

Examines the formation and implementation of public policy by an in-depth focus on a single policy area. The course will investigate a particular policy area for the semester, such as environmental policy or health care policy. Policy study will include analysis of interest groups, public opinion, congressional committees and federal agencies. Research and analytical exercise will be emphasized. 

3 CreditsSPrerequisite: PS101.


INTERNATIONAL POLITICS

Complete one of the following options below: (NOTE: PS-389, PS-199, PS-299 or PS-399 may fulfill requirement depending on specific topic of course.)


OPTION 1:

Take one of the following courses:

PS-241 European Politics

Examines the modern history, political culture, institutions and policies of the major West European states. Britain, France, West Germany and the European Communities are compared along with selected other countries. The major problems confronting these are highlighted.

3 CreditsS, IPrerequisite: PS101 or PS102.

PS-243 U.S. Foreign Policy

Examines U.S. Foreign Policy from the Monroe Doctrine to the New World Order. Special emphasis is given to the tension between isolationism and globalism in this century. The course will focus on contemporary issues such as: the relationship with the UN, the U.S. as a global policeman, and the role of human rights as an American priority. 

3 CreditsS, IPrerequisite: PS102.

PS-298 Gender and Health Care

In this course, we will discuss gender and healthcare policy around the world, focusing on the ethical responsibilities of healthcare policymakers and providers. We consider how gender affects policy and health outcomes in various ways, depending on the cultural context. Class discussions will address topics such as reproductive rights and LGBTQ healthcare access.

3 CreditsSW-ERPre-Req or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109

PS-334 Human Rights

This class focuses on some of the debates concerning human rights: realism versus idealism; individualism versus communitarianism; universalism versus relativism; religious fundamentalism versus secularism; women's rights as human rights; liberalism versus socialism. We review the historical evolution of human rights. We devote part of the semester to the role of literature and the arts in creating and promoting human rights. 

3 CreditsI, SPrerequisite: PS102.

PS-335 Law of Nations

This course explores the substance of modern international law. Course topics may include the Vienna Convention, the UN Charter, the Law of the Sea Convention, the Rome Statute, the International Court of Justice, and the International Criminal Court. The course also explores how nation states interact with these bodies under their internal laws and customary international law. 

3 CreditsI, SPrerequisite: PS 102.

PS-340 Topics in International Politics

Examines international politics in light of a specific topic or issue. The topics include themes such as: Global Environmental Politics, Nationalism, and Competing World Ideologies.

3 CreditsS, I 

PS-346 African Politics

This course examines some of the factors that explain the political problems that plague Africa. Topics include: colonialism, human rights, corruption, ethnicity and pan-Africanism. 

3 CreditsI, S, CWPrerequisite: PS102.


OPTION 2:

Take the following courses:

PS-235 Migration

This two-course series (PS-235/236) The fall semester pre-departure course examines the full range of policy issues related to migration in North America. The winter course/trip travels to southern Mexico, where professors and students from the Autonomous University of Chiapas (UNACH) will help students to gain first-hand insight into Mexico's migration policies through lectures, discussions, and visits to government migration detention centers. In addition to learning from the UNACH scholars, students will learn about Mexican culture from their homestay families. Students must complete both courses in the series to fulfill a Global Engagement course requirement. The total course fee is divided equally between PS-235 and PS-236.

2 CreditsI,S,SW-GE

PS-236 Eyewitness to Migration in Mexico

This two-course series (PS-235/236) The fall semester pre-departure course examines the full range of policy issues related to migration in North America. The winter course/trip travels to southern Mexico, where professors and students from the Autonomous University of Chiapas (UNACH) will help students to gain first-hand insight into Mexico's migration policies through lectures, discussions, and visits to government migration detention centers. In addition to learning from the UNACH scholars, students will learn about Mexican culture from their homestay families. Students must complete both courses in the series to fulfill a Global Engagement course requirement. The total course fee is divided equally between PS-235 and PS-236.

I,S,SW-GEPre-Req: PS-235.


OPTION 3:

Take the following courses:

PS-249 Senegambia I

These courses (PS249 and PS250) are co-requisites. In the fall semester, we study and discuss Gambia's history and contemporary politics and culture. During the winter break, we spend three weeks exploring the political culture and society of The Gambia. 

2 CreditsI, S, CA, SWGSACorequisite: PS250. Students must complete both PS249 and PS250 to receive CA credit. If you want to get Global Engagement credit, after returning from the trip you must complete a 1-credit course that has been approved by the Global Education Committee.

PS-250 Senegambia II

These courses (PS249 and PS250) are co-requisites. In the fall semester, we study and discuss Gambia's history and contemporary politics and culture. During the winter break, we spend three weeks exploring the political culture and society of The Gambia. 

2 CreditsCA, I, S, SWGSACorequisite: PS250. Students must complete both PS249 and PS250 to receive CA credit. If you want to get Global Engagement credit, after returning from the trip you must complete a 1-credit course that has been approved by the Global Education Committee.


POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY & JURISPRUDENCE

Take one of the following courses: (NOTE: PS-389, PS-199, PS-299 or PS-399 may fulfill requirement depending on specific topic of course.)

PS-209 Sexual Politics

In this course, we will discuss the history of sex and gender in political theory and practice. In part one, we will discuss highlights of the history of gender politics in the United States. In part two, we will build on this knowledge by exploring what feminists have to say on important current topics, such as gendered violence and sexuality.

3 CreditsS 

PS-221 American Political Thought

Covers development of American Political Thought from the Revolution to the modern-day. Special attention is given to the tension between liberty and equality in our system, especially as those tensions are revealed in writings of women and African-American writers.

4 CreditsH, CW, SW-US 

PS-222 Western Political Thought

Surveys selected works of philosophers from Plato to Nietzsche. The course will focus on enduring questions -- what is the good, the nature of the best regime, how do freedom and authority intersect, and so on.

4 CreditsH, WK-HTPre-Req or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109

PS-305 Politics in Film

This course is designed as an introduction to the study of ethical ideas as presented in motion pictures. We will look both at the direct representation of political ideas or points of view (especially through satire), and at the way Hollywood has shaped our ideas about the process of ethical decision-making.

4 CreditsH, F,SW-ERPre- or co-requisite: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109

PS-311 Constitutional Interpretation: Powers of Government

An examination of the three branches of government, their constitutional powers, and the limitations on those powers as interpreted by Supreme Court. Special attention is given to the areas of delegated and concurrent powers. The operation of the Supreme Court and the Federal court system are also reviewed. 

4 CreditsHPrerequisites: PS101 or permission.

PS-312 Constitutional Interpretation: Civil Rights

Examines citizen's rights and liberties which the Constitution protects against infringement by the government. Those freedoms enumerated in the Bill of Rights are reviewed as well as the right to privacy, due process, and equal protection.

4 CreditsH, CWPrerequisites: PS101 or permission.

PS-320 Topics Political Philos & Jurisprudence

Examines specific topics in the area of political philosophy and law. Topics will include " Foundations of American Constitutionalism, " " African-American Social and Political Thought, " " Liberalism, " and " Shakespeare's Politics. " Students may take each course for credit.

3 CreditsH 

PS-322 Surveillance and the Constitution

This course examines the increasing reach of surveillance in our society and inquires how the U. S. Constitution creates a legal framework for regulating it. Topics include data collection, public surveillance (e.g., with video cameras), and privacy. Students will consider the economic, ethical, and legal aspects of this practice.

3 CreditsH, SW-ERPre-Req or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109


COMPARATIVE SOCIETIES AND CULTURE

Complete one of the following options below: (NOTE: PS-389, PS-199, PS-299 or PS-399 may fulfill requirement depending on specific topic of course)


OPTION 1:

Take one of the following courses:

PS-241 European Politics

Examines the modern history, political culture, institutions and policies of the major West European states. Britain, France, West Germany and the European Communities are compared along with selected other countries. The major problems confronting these are highlighted.

3 CreditsS, IPrerequisite: PS101 or PS102.

PS-291 Mexican Fulbright Special Topics

This comparative politics course will provide a significant degree of attention to the operation of society and government in a country other than the United States. It will focus on a people and culture outside of the U.S. or on a global challenge. The course will often relate to Mexico or to U.S.-Mexico relations. The specific topic of this course will be determined based on the interests of the Mexico Studies Chair and the needs of the Politics Department.

1-3 CreditsI,S,SW-GE

PS-298 Gender and Health Care

In this course, we will discuss gender and healthcare policy around the world, focusing on the ethical responsibilities of healthcare policymakers and providers. We consider how gender affects policy and health outcomes in various ways, depending on the cultural context. Class discussions will address topics such as reproductive rights and LGBTQ healthcare access.

3 CreditsSW-ERPre-Req or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109

PS-346 African Politics

This course examines some of the factors that explain the political problems that plague Africa. Topics include: colonialism, human rights, corruption, ethnicity and pan-Africanism. 

3 CreditsI, S, CWPrerequisite: PS102.

Any short-term/long-term study abroad course or an appropriate course from departments such as History, PACS, Religion, or World Languages upon approval.


OPTION 2:

Take the following courses:

PS-235 Migration

This two-course series (PS-235/236) The fall semester pre-departure course examines the full range of policy issues related to migration in North America. The winter course/trip travels to southern Mexico, where professors and students from the Autonomous University of Chiapas (UNACH) will help students to gain first-hand insight into Mexico's migration policies through lectures, discussions, and visits to government migration detention centers. In addition to learning from the UNACH scholars, students will learn about Mexican culture from their homestay families. Students must complete both courses in the series to fulfill a Global Engagement course requirement. The total course fee is divided equally between PS-235 and PS-236.

2 CreditsI,S,SW-GE

PS-236 Eyewitness to Migration in Mexico

This two-course series (PS-235/236) The fall semester pre-departure course examines the full range of policy issues related to migration in North America. The winter course/trip travels to southern Mexico, where professors and students from the Autonomous University of Chiapas (UNACH) will help students to gain first-hand insight into Mexico's migration policies through lectures, discussions, and visits to government migration detention centers. In addition to learning from the UNACH scholars, students will learn about Mexican culture from their homestay families. Students must complete both courses in the series to fulfill a Global Engagement course requirement. The total course fee is divided equally between PS-235 and PS-236.

I,S,SW-GEPre-Req: PS-235.


OPTION 3:

Take the following courses:

PS-249 Senegambia I

These courses (PS249 and PS250) are co-requisites. In the fall semester, we study and discuss Gambia's history and contemporary politics and culture. During the winter break, we spend three weeks exploring the political culture and society of The Gambia. 

2 CreditsI, S, CA, SWGSACorequisite: PS250. Students must complete both PS249 and PS250 to receive CA credit. If you want to get Global Engagement credit, after returning from the trip you must complete a 1-credit course that has been approved by the Global Education Committee.

PS-250 Senegambia II

These courses (PS249 and PS250) are co-requisites. In the fall semester, we study and discuss Gambia's history and contemporary politics and culture. During the winter break, we spend three weeks exploring the political culture and society of The Gambia. 

2 CreditsCA, I, S, SWGSACorequisite: PS250. Students must complete both PS249 and PS250 to receive CA credit. If you want to get Global Engagement credit, after returning from the trip you must complete a 1-credit course that has been approved by the Global Education Committee.


INTERPRETING DATA

Take one of the following courses:

DS-110  Intro to Data Science

This course introduces the student to the emerging field of data science through the presentation of basic math and statistics principles, an introduction to the computer tools and software commonly used to perform the data analytics, and a general overview of the machine learning techniques commonly applied to datasets for knowledge discovery. The students will identify a dataset for a final project that will require them to perform preparation, cleaning, simple visualization and analysis of the data with such tools as Excel and R. Understanding the varied nature of data, their acquisition and preliminary analysis provides the requisite skills to succeed in further study and application of the data science field. Prerequisite: comfort with pre-calculus topics and use of computers.

3 CreditsN 

EB-210  Quantitative Business Analysis

This course introduces quantitative techniques for solving business problems and works to establish a link between data analysis and business decision- making. The course presents algebra, graphical methods, applied calculus, and descriptive statistics as tools to aid business decision makers. 

3 CreditsQM,SPrerequisites: High school algebra or pre-calculus. 

EB-211  Business Statistics

This course covers basic descriptive and inferential statistics, normal curve and z-score computations, and addresses hypothesis testing using Chi-Square, T-Test, ANOVA, and linear regression modelling.

3 Credits QS,S

ESS-230 Environmetrics

This course is a survey of the various visual, statistical, and modeling approaches commonly used in the analysis of environmental data. The course covers: (1) visual literacy from exploratory data inquisition to poster creation; (2) elementary group comparison such as t-test and ANOVA and their non-parametric analogs;(3) basic systems modeling; and (4) regression modeling techniques based on the generalized linear model framework.

3 CreditsN, QS, CTGES, CTGISPrerequisites: Sophomore standing and permission of the instructor.

MA-205 Elementary Statistics

Introduction to traditional statistical concepts including descriptive statistics, binomial and normal probability models, confidence intervals, tests of hypotheses, linear correlation and regression, two-way contingency tables, and one-way analysis of variance.

4 CreditsN, QS, WK-SPPrerequisite: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109

MA-220 Introduction to Probability & Statistics

An introduction to the basic ideas and techniques of probability theory and to selected topics in statistics, such as sampling theory, confidence intervals, and linear regression.

4 CreditsN, QS, CTGESPrerequisite: MA130

MA-321 Multivariate Statistics

A class in multivariate statistical techniques including non-parametric methods, multiple regression, logistic regression, multiple testing, principle analysis.

3 CreditsN, QSPrerequisites: An introductory statistics course ( MA220 or BI305 or PY214 or EB211) and linear algebra (MA 160) or Calculus 1 (MA 130).

PY-360 Research Methods and Statistics for Psychology I

Part 1 of a 2-part sequence of Research Methods and Statistics for Psychology I and II. This course focuses on becoming a better research producer and a research consumer from a psychological science perspective. Students will learn to think critically about media claims and accurately summarize primary source articles about behavior. Students will learn to use statistical software to accurately describe data. Students will learn to communicate effectively about research through written and oral work and make ethical judgments informed by APA ethical standards. Students will design and execute their own individual research studies.

4 CreditsCW, Q, SPrerequisite: PY101

SW-214  Integrated Research Methods & Stats I

An integrated course sequence applying processes of social inquiry to the assessment of historically oppressed and vulnerable populations, and of the interventions used to help those populations. This course integrates key research concepts and commonly used quantitative and qualitative methods in the social sciences, with the ability to communicate effectively about research with written and verbal skills. The course teaches students not only to conduct social science research but also to consume and utilize social science research in a critical way, including in practice as a helping professional.

3 CreditsS,WK-SI 


ECONOMICS

Take one of the following courses:

EB-105  International Economic Issues

Understanding international economics is increasingly important for private and public decision-makers. In a world of growing economic interdependence, the ability of policy makers to provide a stable environment for business is a key issue. Accordingly, this course develops the principle topics of international economics, including trade theory, the balance of payments, the cause and consequences of exchange rate movements, the flow of capital, currency crises and regional trade issues. The applied topics emphasized will be based on the most pressing current issues.

3 CreditsS,I

EB-222  Principles of Macroeconomics

Macroeconomic conditions affect individuals and businesses in numerous ways: employment opportunities, the purchasing power of wages and salaries, the cost of borrowing money, sales, profits, and competitiveness against foreign businesses. This course develops the theories relevant to understanding the business cycle, inflation, unemployment, deflation, exchange rates and balance of payments problems. It also examines the options and tradeoffs governments face as they seek to provide a stable macroeconomic environment through monetary and fiscal policies. Case studies of the macroeconomic performance and policies of diverse countries provide a comparative orientation. 

3 CreditsSPrerequisites: Sophomore, Junior, or Senior standing 

EB-223  Principles of Microeconomics

The optimizing behavior of households and firms serves as the focal point in this study of market-based resource allocation. Supply and demand analysis, spending and saving decisions of households, production and employment decisions of firms, alternative market structures, and environmental economics are among the topics covered. 

3 CreditsSPrerequisite: Sophomore, Junior, or Senior standing. 

ESS-305 Environmental Economics

This course will cover the basics of microeconomic analysis as it applies to the environmental decision making and environmental policy with respect to pollution abetment, resource harvesting, and sustainability analysis. The course will also explore the strengths and weaknesses of economic models of human behavior. Finally, the course explores the growing concern of sustainable and resilient economies. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or permission of the instructor.

3 CreditsS 


ELECTIVES

Take 12 credits from the Politics Department - any course with a PS prefix.  (NOTE: Global Climate Change counts as a Politics Department elective)


CAPSTONE

Complete one of the following categories below:


Senior Seminar

PS-499 Senior Seminar

Intended as a capstone experience in the discipline and designed to engage students in their final year in the comprehensive study of a major question or issue confronting the discipline of political science. 

3 CreditsSPrerequisites: PS101 or PS102 or PS222 and senior standing and three additional Political Science courses or departmental permission.


Honors Research Series

PS-497 Honors Research I

Designed to offer exceptional students the opportunity to engage in an extensive undergraduate thesis or research project. Selected students will be invited by the faculty of the department to propose a subject of special interest to the students; working closely with at least one member of the department, students will develop and complete a research project in the first semester and present the results as a publishable paper in the second. Available by permission.

3 CreditsS 

PS-498 Honors Research II

Designed to offer exceptional students the opportunity to complete the research paper started in PS497. 

3 CreditsSPrerequisite: PS497.


IMPORTANT: No more than six credits of Internship can be included in your POE.  No more than six credits of Mock Trial can be included in your POE.  The same course cannot be used to satisfy more than one POE requirement.  A total of 18 credits must be at the 300-level or above.


POE Credit Total = 48

Students must complete at least 18 credits at the 300/400-level.  Any course exception must be approved by the advisor and/or department chair.