REQUIRED CORE

Take the following courses:

PACS-105  Introduction to Conflict Resolution

A survey of the field of conflict, this course explores the causes and consequences of social conflict. Theory and case studies are used to understand interpersonal disputes, the intricacies of groups in conflict and international issues and crisis. Emphasis is given to understanding the basic theoretical concepts of the field and developing basic conflict resolving skills.

3 CreditsS 

PACS-110  Introduction to Peace & Conflict Studies

This course explores war and deep-rooted conflict as human problems and peace as a human potential. Students collaborate in small groups to explore a range of different approaches to peace around the world. 

3 CreditsI,SWGH2Prerequisite or corequisite: FYC or CWS 

PS-102 Introduction to International Politics

Analyzes the principles and practice of international relations and the foreign policy of the United States, political, diplomatic, military and economic.

4 CreditsS, I, SW-GE

HS-320 Interpreting Terrorism

You have grown up in a world shaped by terrorism. How did this happen? What is terrorism, how has it developed, and how have people responded to it? In this course, we will analyze (interpret) terrorism from different directions: its many definitions, its general history beginning with the French Revolution, and the many ways in which people have responded to it. You will also dive into specific topics and present (interpret) your research for a non-academic audience. It is important for us historians to communicate effectively. If we can broaden and deepen the public's understanding of, and appreciation for, the past, we enrich our society. You will learn how to convey your knowledge in a way that the public will find accessible, and even enjoyable or exciting. Course requirements include a field trip.

3 CreditsSW-ER 

EB-105  International Economic Issues

Understanding international economics is increasingly important for private and public decision-makers. In a world of growing economic interdependence, the ability of policy makers to provide a stable environment for business is a key issue. Accordingly, this course develops the principle topics of international economics, including trade theory, the balance of payments, the cause and consequences of exchange rate movements, the flow of capital, currency crises and regional trade issues. The applied topics emphasized will be based on the most pressing current issues.

3 CreditsS,I

EB-381  International Political Economy

The pursuit of wealth and power, profit and privilege, corporate growth and national security occurs in a global context. This course examines the business agendas and political priorities that find expression in the policy agreements and institutional agreements of the contemporary global economy. The course is conducted as a seminar and requires a substantial research project. 

3 CreditsS,IPrerequisite: EB105. 


SKILLS & METHODS COURSES

Take 3 credits from the following courses:

CM-310 Understanding Health Inequity

In this class, students will learn how to read, understand, and conduct social research about individuals and systems that create disparity in health care and outcomes. The research that we will read and learn to conduct will rely on texts and stories rather than numbers and statistics. The class will address questions such as: what conditions are present that allow some populations greater access to health care than others? What social problems underlie the disparities in health outcomes for women, people of color, and people from low-income backgrounds. Students will gather and analyze their own research data.

3 CreditsS, WK-SIPre-Req or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109

ESS-100 Environmental Systems I

This course introduces students to the concept of systems, reviews ecological systems, and then goes on to human systems as these impact the environment. The course will explore the two forces that are at the core of most environmental impacts (climate change, ozone depletion, air and water pollution, and a loss of biodiversity) will be explored as will the fundamental attributes of agriculture, food, soil, and water. Throughout, the influence of culture, society, ethics, and science on the environmental problems will be discussed. 

4 CreditsN, WK-SP, CTGISPre-Req or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

ESS-206 Global Environmental Issues

Global Environmental Issues is a global public health course. Environmental problems create some of the most pressing public health issues of our time. This course seeks to train the participants to identify the public health challenges created by environmental problems in various parts of the world and exploring practical solutions for those problems.

4 CreditsN, WK-SI

MA-205 Elementary Statistics

Introduction to traditional statistical concepts including descriptive statistics, binomial and normal probability models, confidence intervals, tests of hypotheses, linear correlation and regression, two-way contingency tables, and one-way analysis of variance.

4 CreditsN, QS, WK-SPPrerequisite: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109


CAPSTONE/EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING

Complete one of the following options below (at least 3-4 credits).  A capstone in History, Economics or Politics may be substituted in consultation with POE advisor.


OPTION 1:

PACS-455  PACS Honors Thesis I

Designed to serve as a course for students who emphasize PACS in their POE. The student will produce a major research paper that examines in depth a topic, theme, issue, or problem that has served as an area of special interest for the student throughout the previous two years of study. 

3-6 CreditsHPrerequisite: Senior standing, PACS105 and PACS110 and a minimum of 4 200+ level PACS courses. 

PACS-455B  PACS Honors Thesis II

Designed to serve as a capstone for students who emphasize PACS in their POE. The student will be expected to produce a major research paper that examines in depth a topic, theme, issue, or problem that has served as an area of special interest for the student throughout the previous two years of study. 

3-6 CreditsSPrerequisite is Senior standing. PACS105 and PACS110 and a minimum of 4 200+ level PACS courses. 


OPTION 2:

PACS-490  Peace & Conflict Studies Internship

An opportunity which requires students to relate theory and practice to a working environment and to reflect upon that experience. 

2-9 CreditsICorequisite: PACS 495. Prerequisite: Permission and Jr. or Sr. Standing. 

PACS-495  PACS Intern.Res.Sem.

Requires students to reflect on the internship experience and/or pursue research related to the placement. 

2-6 CreditsIPrerequisite: PACS110 and permission. Corequisite: PACS490. 


INTERNATIONAL STUDIES ELECTIVE COURSES

Take a minimum of 12 credits from the following courses.  At least three departments must be represented from the list below.  At least 8 credits must be at the 300/400 level to reach the 18 credit upper-level POE requirement.

Peace and Conflict Studies Courses:

PACS-305  Gender and Conflict

This course looks at the intersection of gender and conflict to understand what it means to say that a conflict is gendered. It uses gender as an organizing concept to study issues of gender equality, justice, and peace, challenging andinterrogating dichotomous, oppositionalconstructions of masculinity and femininity to understand how they contribute to direct, structural, and cultural violence. 

3 CreditsS,I,CW,SW-ERPrerequisite: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109

PACS-308  Nonviolence and Social Justice

A study of the theory and practice ofnon-violence, this course explores both the theoretical development of nonviolence and the use of nonviolence as a means for waging and resolving conflict. The course explores nonviolence theory as it applies to issues of social change, alternative defense, and personal transformation, using writings from political, sociological, feminist, religious and philosophical perspectives. (Formerly titled Nonviolence: Theory and Practice)

3 CreditsS,H,CW,SW-USPrerequisite: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

PACS-310 Digital Peacebuilding

This course will examine how tech entrepreneurs, programmers, peacebuilders, NGOs, and civil society groups leverage smartphones, Information Communication Technologies (ICTs), crowd-mapping platforms, SMS-based mass texting tools, and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for coordinating natural disaster and humanitarian crisis responses, countering election violence, and raising public awareness against corruption and gender-based violence across the world.

3 Credits


Accounting, Business and Economics Courses:

EB-202  Behavioral Analysis of Organizations

The broad focus of the course is to examine how individuals come together to form a successful organization. The course is broken into three major sections: people, organizations, and leadership. The course emphasizes student involvement and engages students in a variety of in-class exercises, case analysis role playing exercises, small group exercises, and an off-campus class experience or two. One or more off-campus experiences are required for the course. 

4 CreditsCW,S,WK-SIPrerequisite: Sophomore standing.

EB-222  Principles of Macroeconomics

Macroeconomic conditions affect individuals and businesses in numerous ways: employment opportunities, the purchasing power of wages and salaries, the cost of borrowing money, sales, profits, and competitiveness against foreign businesses. This course develops the theories relevant to understanding the business cycle, inflation, unemployment, deflation, exchange rates and balance of payments problems. It also examines the options and tradeoffs governments face as they seek to provide a stable macroeconomic environment through monetary and fiscal policies. Case studies of the macroeconomic performance and policies of diverse countries provide a comparative orientation. 

3 CreditsSPrerequisites: Sophomore, Junior, or Senior standing 

EB-223  Principles of Microeconomics

The optimizing behavior of households and firms serves as the focal point in this study of market-based resource allocation. Supply and demand analysis, spending and saving decisions of households, production and employment decisions of firms, alternative market structures, and environmental economics are among the topics covered. 

3 CreditsSPrerequisite: Sophomore, Junior, or Senior standing. 


Environmental Science and Studies Courses:

ESS-206 Global Environmental Issues

Global Environmental Issues is a global public health course. Environmental problems create some of the most pressing public health issues of our time. This course seeks to train the participants to identify the public health challenges created by environmental problems in various parts of the world and exploring practical solutions for those problems.

4 CreditsN, WK-SI

ESS-305 Environmental Economics

This course will cover the basics of microeconomic analysis as it applies to the environmental decision making and environmental policy with respect to pollution abetment, resource harvesting, and sustainability analysis. The course will also explore the strengths and weaknesses of economic models of human behavior. Finally, the course explores the growing concern of sustainable and resilient economies. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or permission of the instructor.

3 CreditsS 

ESS-337 Environmental Law

This course will examine the major environmental laws in the United States and major Supreme Court cases covering these statutes. The status covered will be National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), The Clean Water Act (CWA), The Clean Air Acr (CAA), The Endangered Species Act (ESA), Federal Insecticide Fungicide and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA), and The Toxic Substances Control Act (TOSCA), The Forest Land Policy and Management Act (FLPMA), Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), and the Superfund Amendment and Reauthorization Act (SARA).

3 CreditsS, CTGISPrerequisites: PS101 and ESS100 plus sophomore standing.


History Courses:

HS-200 The Great War

This class is a social, cultural, and political history of the First World War. While the course will examine the different combatants and theaters of the war, we will focus on the perspective of Britain and the British Empire, as we seek to understand what it was like for soldiers and civilians to live through the war.

4 CreditsI, H, CW,WK-HT 

HS-204 Australia/New Zealand

This course is a comparative introduction to the history of New Zealand and Australia. We will begin the course by studying the indigenous people of the region: Australian Aborigines in Australia and Maoris in New Zealand, before moving to think about the arrival of white settlers. During the semester, we will pay particular attention to the process of colonization and dispossession, race and gender relations, the search for national identity, popular culture, and politics in the two countries.

4 CreditsI, H 

HS-213 History of Ireland

This course is an introduction to the history of Ireland, beginning with an overview of the early history. We will explore the Tudor revolutions, English colonialism, the question of identity in the island, Irish Republicanism. home rule movements, the partition of Ireland, and the " troubles " in the North of the island of Ireland.

4 CreditsH, WK-HT 

HS-313 Disease, Medicine & Empire

Disease, Medicine and Empire will explore the intersections of disease, medicine, and race in European empires in the nineteenth and twentieth century.

3 CreditsCA, I, H, CTGES 

HS-367 Women in Africa

This course will provide students with an understanding of women in sub-Saharan African cultures, their history, traditions, diversity, resilience and adaptability. To do this we will be looking at social structure, kinship networks, economic systems, gender relations, ethnicity and ethnic conflicts, traditional religion, the HIV/AIDS epidemic and other health issues.

4 CreditsCA, H, I, CTDH 

HS-400 Crimes Against Humanity

This course explores the emergence, evolution, varieties, underlying causes, and means of confronting and coming to terms with genocide and other crimes against humanity. During the course of the semester, we will examine a range of historical contexts and we will also confront tough questions about ethics, resistance, and responsibility. 

4 CreditsI, HPrerequisites: Junior or Senior standing. Sophomores require permission.


Philosophy Courses:

PL-101  Introduction to Philosophy

This course provides students with the background and conceptual tools that are required for more advanced study in the subject. At the discretion of the instructor, the course will either examine fundamental philosophical problems or provide a survey of important thinkers. 

3 CreditsH,WK-HTPre-Req or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109 

PL-105  Introduction to Logic

An analysis of practical reasoning skills, including a systematic approach to informal arguments and the meaning of everyday claims. Aristotelian logic, Venn Diagrams, propositional logic and symbolic logic are included.

4 CreditsH,WK-FR 

PL-310  Contemporary Political Philosophy

This course will focus on important political orientations and figures in the twentieth/early twenty-first century. Instructors may also focus on specific topics which have driven recent debates in contemporary political philosophy, including distributive justice, the normative foundations of liberalism/democracy or the tension between state sovereignty and international law (among others).

4 CreditsS,H,CWPrerequisites: Take 1 course from the PL department or permission of the instructor. 


Political Science Courses:

PS-222 Western Political Thought

Surveys selected works of philosophers from Plato to Nietzsche. The course will focus on enduring questions -- what is the good, the nature of the best regime, how do freedom and authority intersect, and so on.

4 CreditsH, WK-HTPre-Req or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109

PS-235 Migration

This two-course series (PS-235/236) The fall semester pre-departure course examines the full range of policy issues related to migration in North America. The winter course/trip travels to southern Mexico, where professors and students from the Autonomous University of Chiapas (UNACH) will help students to gain first-hand insight into Mexico's migration policies through lectures, discussions, and visits to government migration detention centers. In addition to learning from the UNACH scholars, students will learn about Mexican culture from their homestay families. Students must complete both courses in the series to fulfill a Global Engagement course requirement. The total course fee is divided equally between PS-235 and PS-236.

2 CreditsI,S,SW-GE

PS-236 Eyewitness to Migration in Mexico

This two-course series (PS-235/236) The fall semester pre-departure course examines the full range of policy issues related to migration in North America. The winter course/trip travels to southern Mexico, where professors and students from the Autonomous University of Chiapas (UNACH) will help students to gain first-hand insight into Mexico's migration policies through lectures, discussions, and visits to government migration detention centers. In addition to learning from the UNACH scholars, students will learn about Mexican culture from their homestay families. Students must complete both courses in the series to fulfill a Global Engagement course requirement. The total course fee is divided equally between PS-235 and PS-236.

I,S,SW-GEPre-Req: PS-235.

PS-241 European Politics

Examines the modern history, political culture, institutions and policies of the major West European states. Britain, France, West Germany and the European Communities are compared along with selected other countries. The major problems confronting these are highlighted.

3 CreditsS, IPrerequisite: PS101 or PS102.

PS-249 Senegambia I

These courses (PS249 and PS250) are co-requisites. In the fall semester, we study and discuss Gambia's history and contemporary politics and culture. During the winter break, we spend three weeks exploring the political culture and society of The Gambia. 

2 CreditsI, S, CA, SWGSACorequisite: PS250. Students must complete both PS249 and PS250 to receive CA credit. If you want to get Global Engagement credit, after returning from the trip you must complete a 1-credit course that has been approved by the Global Education Committee.

PS-250 Senegambia II

These courses (PS249 and PS250) are co-requisites. In the fall semester, we study and discuss Gambia's history and contemporary politics and culture. During the winter break, we spend three weeks exploring the political culture and society of The Gambia. 

2 CreditsCA, I, S, SWGSACorequisite: PS250. Students must complete both PS249 and PS250 to receive CA credit. If you want to get Global Engagement credit, after returning from the trip you must complete a 1-credit course that has been approved by the Global Education Committee.

PS-334 Human Rights

This class focuses on some of the debates concerning human rights: realism versus idealism; individualism versus communitarianism; universalism versus relativism; religious fundamentalism versus secularism; women's rights as human rights; liberalism versus socialism. We review the historical evolution of human rights. We devote part of the semester to the role of literature and the arts in creating and promoting human rights. 

3 CreditsI, SPrerequisite: PS102.

PS-340 Topics in International Politics

Examines international politics in light of a specific topic or issue. The topics include themes such as: Global Environmental Politics, Nationalism, and Competing World Ideologies.

3 CreditsS, I 


Religious Studies Courses:

RL-123 Global Religions Today

This class looks at how global religions engage with contemporary challenges and issues. We will discuss scriptures, rituals, and current events primarily based on sources within each tradition.

4 CreditsH,I,CS,SW-GEPre-Req or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

RL-341  Religion and War

This course explores the role of religion in warfare. It looks at the evolution of religion and war in our species, modern anthropological investigations of religion and war, religious discussions of war in Western and non-Western religions.

4 CreditsCA,H,CW 


World Language Courses:

WL-201 Language in Motion

In this course, international students, study-abroad returnees, students with other international experiences, heritage speakers, and/or upper-level language students expand their knowledge of language and culture, process their own intercultural and language-learning experiences, and enrich local school classrooms. In addition to learning about teaching language and culture and the school context, students develop individual projects for presentation in school classrooms.

1 CreditH, I, CS, SW-LE 

Take any World Lanaguage course above the 100 level.


STUDY ABROAD

Students are strongly recommended to study abroad for at least one semester (12-15 credits).

*Study abroad is waived for International Students.  International Students or students opting not to study abroad will have to complete an additional 12 upper-level credits from the courses listed above.  


POE Credit Total = 40-45

Students must complete at least 18 credits at the 300/400-level.  Any course exception must be approved by the advisor and/or department chair.


What to Expect?

What your four years in the International Studies Department at Juniata College might look like.  International Studies students must understand both the diversity of human experience and the interconnectedness of problems in our increasingly global political, economic, and cultural environments.

 
Students in the International Studies Program:

  • Develop the ability to recognize cultural differences and to communicate with members of other cultures in their languages
  • Develop critical interpretive skills
  • Acquire contextual knowledge through the analysis of past and present issues
  • Are aware of and sensitive to ethical issues in global contexts