This Program of Emphasis includes two options:


OPTION 1:  3+2 engineering (two degrees) in cooperation with one of our affiliated engineering universities.

The 3+2 option is structured to prepare a student to go to engineering school in our 3+2 program. The physics, mathematics, chemistry and computer science consists of a broad introduction to the field, providing basic knowledge and initial analytical skill development for the engineering profession. Generally, this POE option is designed to meet the entrance requirements of the engineering schools with which we are affiliated: Penn State University, Columbia University, and Washington University in St. Louis. Since these requirements vary somewhat from school to school, advice from the Engineering Advisor is essential in the planning process. Columbia University requires a GPA of 3.3 and all required courses must have a grade of a B or higher. Washington University in St. Louis requires a minimum GPA of 3.25 overall and also in the science and mathematics courses. Many of Penn State's engineering programs also have "Enrollment control" which mean they do not participate in the 3+2 program at the current time. At present time, the following Penn State departments are under enrollment control: Aerospace Engineering, Bioengineering, Computer Engineering, Industrial Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering. None of our other 3+2 cooperating universities have enrollment controls in place. Penn State Harrisburg also offers some engineering programs. Although we do not have a formal 3+2 program specifically with PSU-Harrisburg, students have completed a 3+2 program with them in the past and arrangements may be made on an individual basis.


OPTION 2:  4-year, engineering-oriented Juniata College degree.

This option provides a technical background for a person who wishes to seek general employment in a technical industrial situation which does not require specific engineering training. The mathematics sequence in these three options offers the necessary problem-solving techniques and discipline required for the upper-level physics courses at Juniata and the upper-level engineering courses at an engineering school. The first two years of physics consists of a broad introduction to the field, providing basic knowledge and initial analytical skill development. Substantial laboratory work is included in these options to insure contact with concrete phenomena.
A 3+2 engineering student who decides to extend Juniata's education to four years, but who intends to go to an engineering school for either a BS or a graduate degree in engineering, may find this program to be useful.


 Please note that this POE is not designed for those interested in Chemical Engineering. Please speak both with the Engineering Advisor in the physics department and with a chemistry advisor if you are interested in Chemical Engineering.


MATHEMATICS CORE

Take the following courses:

MA-130 Calculus I

An introduction to calculus including differentiation and integration of elementary functions of a single variable, limits, tangents, rates of change, maxima and minima, area, volume, and other applications. Integrates the use of computer algebra systems, and graphical, algebraic and numerical thinking.

4 CreditsN, QM

MA-160 Linear Algebra

An introduction to systems of linear equations, matrices, determinants, vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues, and applications.

3 CreditsN, QMPrerequisites: MA130.

MA-230 Calculus II

Expands the treatment of two-space using polar and parametric equations. Emphasizes multivariable calculus, including vectors in three dimensions, curves and surfaces in space, functions of several variables, partial differentiation, multiple integration, and applications.

4 CreditsN, QMPrerequisite: MA130

MA-235 Calculus III

A continuation of the calculus sequence. Topics include methods of integration by Simpson's Rule, applications, Taylor and Fourier series; introduction to ordinary differential equations; integration in polar, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates; differential and integral vector calculus.

4 CreditsN, QMPrerequisites: MA230.

MA-335 Differential Equations

Theory and application of ordinary differential equations. Emphasis on modern qualitative techniques, with numerical and analytical approaches used when appropriate. Contains a brief introduction to partial differential equations.

4 CreditsN, QMPrerequisites: MA130 and MA230 and MA235 or MA233.


COMPUTER SCIENCE CORE

Take the following course:

CS-110  Computer Science I

An introductory study of computer science software development concepts. Python is used to introduce a disciplined approach to problem solving methods, algorithm development, software design, coding, debugging, testing, and documentation in the object oriented paradigm. This is the first course in the study of computer science. 

3 CreditsN,CTGES,CTGISRecommended programming experience or IT110 or IT100, IT111 or IM110 or MA103 but not necessary. 


Take one of the following courses:

CS-255F  FORTRAN Programming

The students will prepare a portfolio of computer programs written in the FORTRAN language, The programs are reviewed, critiqued, and the student has an opportunity to revise them as needed for final inclusion in the portfolio. 

2 CreditsNPrerequisites: CS110 and Sophomore standing and permission of instructor. 

CS-255C   C++ Programming

The students will prepare a portfolio of computer programs written in the language. The programs are reviewed, critiqued, and then the student has an opportunity to revise them as needed for final inclusion in the portfolio. 

2 CreditsNPrerequisites: CS110 and Sophomore standing and permission. 


CHEMISTRY CORE

Take the following courses:

CH-142 Integrated Chemistry Principles I

An introduction to the principles of chemistry, this course begins a two semester sequence that integrates information from all aspects of chemistry while focusing on the core principles of the relationships between energy, the structure of atoms and molecules, and atomic and molecular properties and reactivity. Topics include energy, reactions, atomic structure, elemental properties, bonding, and molecular properties.

3 CreditsNCorequisite CH143

CH-143 Integrated Chem Principles I Lab

This semester will focus on learning good laboratory practices, primarily through the quantitative analysis of compounds. The quantitative analysis of materials and an understanding of reproducibility and bias are relevant to many fields, including medical analysis or the analysis of contaminants in the environment. This course will also teach you how to keep an excellent laboratory notebook, identify safety hazards in the lab, and complete data analysis and graphing in Excel. All of these tools will serve you well in a variety of careers.

1 CreditsN, QSCH142 is a corequisite of this course. A lab fee is associated with this course.

CH-144 Integrated Chemistry Principles II

An introduction to the principles of chemistry, this course completes a two semester sequence that integrates information from all aspects of chemistry while focusing on the core principles of the relationships between energy, the structure of atoms and molecules, and atomic and molecular properties and reactivity. Topics include thermodynamics, equilibrium reactions, acid/base and redox reactions, kinetics and nuclear reactions.

3 CreditsNPrerequisite: CH-142

CH-145 Integrated Chemistry Principles II Lab

This semester will focus on learning good laboratory practices, primarily through the quantitative analysis of compounds. The quantitative analysis of materials and an understanding of reproducibility and bias are relevant to many fields, including medical analysis or the analysis of contaminants in the environment. This course will also teach you how to keep an excellent laboratory notebook, identify safety hazards in the lab, and complete data analysis and graphing in Excel. All of these tools will serve you well in a variety of careers.

1 CreditN, QSPrerequisite: CH-143. A lab fee is associated with this course.


PHYSICS CORE

Take the following courses:

PC-189 Physics Seminar I

Seminar series, required of all freshmen Physics/Physics-Engineering POEs, consisting of research seminars given by invited speakers and members of the department, both faculty and students. Discussions regarding specific career opportunities and preparation for graduate studies will also be an integral part of the seminar series.

1 Credit  

PC-203 Intro Physics II

A calculus-based introduction to basic principles of electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic waves and optics. Additional topics may include atoms and molecules, nuclear physics, relativity and solid state physics.

3 CreditsN, QMPrerequisite: Take PC-202 or PC-204. Corequisite: PC-203L.

PC-203L Intro Physics Lab II

An algebra-based introductory laboratory experience designed to accompany PC-203. The individual experiments will involve topics in circuits, light and optics, and nuclear physics.

1 CreditNPrerequisite: PC-202 or PC-204. Corequisite: PC-203.

PC-289 Physics Seminar II

Seminar series, required of all sophomore Physics/Physics-Engineering POEs, consisting of research seminars given by invited speakers and members of the department, both faculty and students. Discussions regarding specific career opportunities and preparation for graduate studies will also be an integral part of the seminar series. 

1 Credit Prerequisites: PC189.

PC-300 Modern Physics Lab

The origin and progress of physics in the 20th century, including relativity and quantum theory with applications in atomic and molecular physics, nuclear physics, elementary particles and possibly some solid state physics. Note: A special fee is assessed. 

3 CreditsN, CWPrerequisites: MA230 and PC203. Corequisite: PC301.

PC-301  Theoretical Modern Physics

The origins and progress of Physics in the 20th century, including relativity and quantum theory with applications in atomic and molecular physics, nuclear physics, elementary particles and possibly some solid state physics. 

3 CreditsNPrerequisites: MA230 or PC203. Corequisite: MA235.

PC-320 Engineering Mechanics I: Statics

A problem-solving approach to applied mechanics involving equilibrium of co-planar and non-planar force systems, analysis of frames and trusses, friction, centroids and moments of inertia. 

3 CreditsNPrerequisite: PC202 or PC204.

PC-321 Engineering Mechanics II: Dynamics

A problem-solving approach to applied mechanics involving the kinematics and kinetics of particles and rigid bodies. Techniques involving Newton's laws, work-energy and impulse momentum are presented and used extensively. 

3 CreditsNPrerequisite: PC320.

PC-389  Physics Seminar III

Seminar series, required of all junior Physics/Physics-Engineering POEs, consisting of research seminars given by invited speakers and members of the department, both faculty and students. Discussions regarding specific career opportunities and preparation for graduate studies will also be an integral part of the seminar series. 

1 Credit Prerequisite: PC289.


Complete one of the following options below:

OPTION 1:

PC-202 Intro Physics I

A calculus-based introduction to the basic principles of mechanics (including periodic motion and dynamics), heat and thermodynamics, and special relativity. 

3 CreditsN, QMCorequisite: PC-202L and Corequisite or Prerequisite: MA130.

PC-202L Intro Physics Lab I

This lab is a calculus-based introductory laboratory experience that is designed to accompany PC202. Individual experiments will correlate with the course, including kinematics, Newton's Laws, energy, and momentum. Note: A special fee is assessed. 

1 CreditNCorequisite: PC202.


OPTION 2:

PC-204 University Physics

A calculus-based introduction to the basic principles of mechanics (including periodic motion, statics, and dynamics), heat and thermodynamics, and special relativity. This course includes an integrated introductory laboratory experience. This course is designed to be taken by students interested in a POE in Physics or Engineering Physics. Note: a special fee is assessed. 

4 CreditsN, QM, WK-FRCorequisite: MA-130


ADDITIONAL PHYSICS CORE

Take the following courses:

PC-307 Advanced Physics Lab

Provides laboratory projects at the intermediate level. A series of projects is offered which best meet the educational needs of the student. 

3 CreditsN, QS, CWPrerequisite: PC300. Special fee assessed.

PC-489  Physics Seminar IV

Seminar series, required of all senior Physics/Physics-Engineering POEs, consisting of research seminars given by invited speakers and members of the department, both faculty and students. Discussions regarding specific career opportunities and preparation for graduate studies will also be an integral part of the seminar series. Prerequisite: PC389, and restricted to Seniors with POE of Physics or Engineering Physics.

1 Credit  


Take an additional 300/400 level Physics, Mathematics or Chemistry course at that 300/400 level.


*Additional courses for 3-2 Engineering

The following are examples of courses that may be taken for specific kinds of engineering:

PC-209 Electronics

An introduction to the theory and application of analog and digital electronics, starting with basic AC and DC circuits. The unit explains the principles of operation of the power supply, amplifier, oscillator, logic circuits, micro controllers, and other basic circuits. An associated laboratory component allows construction of and measurements on the circuits under consideration. Note: a special fee is assessed.

3 CreditsN 

GL-100  Intro to Physical Geology

An introduction to the principles and methods of geology. Emphasis is placed on the geologic forces at work in our physical environment. Topics covered include internal processes such as volcanism, earthquakes, mountain building and the flow of groundwater as well as external processes such as landslides, flooding, erosion and landscape formation. Emphasis is given to the interaction of human activities with these physical processes as well as the processes themselves.

3 CreditsN 

CH-232 Organic Chemistry I

Students enrolled in CH-242 will become familiar with the fundamental concepts and nomenclature needed to understand and communicate organic chemistry. The course is furtherdesigned to teach the structure-function relationships that exist across many classes of organic and bio-organic systems, and therefore provide a foundation for further study in chemistry, biochemistry, biology, and medicine.

3 CreditsNPrerequisite: CH-144; Corequisite: CH-233.

NOTE: In addition, students should add to the POE a course in speech, a course in technical writing, and a course in economics.


*Additional courses for Four-year Engineering Physics

The following are examples of courses that may be taken for four-year Engineering Physics:

PC-307 Advanced Physics Lab

Provides laboratory projects at the intermediate level. A series of projects is offered which best meet the educational needs of the student. 

3 CreditsN, QS, CWPrerequisite: PC300. Special fee assessed.

PC-489  Physics Seminar IV

Seminar series, required of all senior Physics/Physics-Engineering POEs, consisting of research seminars given by invited speakers and members of the department, both faculty and students. Discussions regarding specific career opportunities and preparation for graduate studies will also be an integral part of the seminar series. Prerequisite: PC389, and restricted to Seniors with POE of Physics or Engineering Physics.

1 Credit  

NOTE: At least one additional 300 or 400 level Physics, Mathematics, or Chemistry course that carries at least three credits.


POE Credit Total = 63

Students must complete at least 18 credits at the 300/400-level.  Any course exception must be approved by the advisor and/or department chair.