Required Courses (30 Credits)

SO-101 Introduction to Sociology
Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S
The study of human social groups and the social processes that lead to both structural and cultural integration and differentiation primarily within contemporary American society.


PS-101 Introduction to American Government
Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; S
An introduction to the theory and practice of American government. The course surveys the underlying structure of American politics, its economic, cultural and legal foundations and the daily practice of politics, e.g. groups, parties, and the mass media. Students are asked to develop an account of American politics and to assess the principal features of political life in the United States according to the standards they have framed.


PL-106 Introduction to Ethics
Either Semester; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; H
Examines the historically valid ethical approaches to problems, i.e., pragmatic, relativistic and absolute and the application of such methods to contemporary ethical dilemmas, e.g., abortion, terrorism, euthanasia and capital punishment.


SO-260 Introduction to Criminal Justice
Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S
Explores the nature of crime, the history of criminal justice, and the process of the modern justice system. Prerequisites: SO101 or AN151.


SO-302 Social Deviance and Criminology
Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S
Examines contemporary psychological and sociological theories of behavior deviation, including crime, delinquency, substance abuse and selected other categories. Typologies for classifying and studying crime are developed and evaluated. Trends in behavior deviation, including the characteristics of offenders and victims, are critically explored. Informal and formal, as well as proactive and reactive, social control systems aimed at managing behavior deviation are described and analyzed. Prerequisites: SO101 or AN151.


SO 3XX Corrections (this course is now under development)


SO 3XX Policing (this course is now under development)

Methods Requirement

SW-214 Integrated Research Methods & Stats I
Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S,WK-SI
An integrated course sequence applying processes of social inquiry to the assessment of historically oppressed and vulnerable populations, and of the interventions used to help those populations. This course integrates key research concepts and commonly used quantitative and qualitative methods in the social sciences, with the ability to communicate effectively about research with written and verbal skills. The course teaches students not only to conduct social science research but also to consume and utilize social science research in a critical way, including in practice as a helping professional.

-- and --

SW 215 Integrated Methods & Stats II

-- or --

PY-361 Research Methods & Stats Psychology II
Fall & Spring; All Years; 4.00 Credits; S,CW,QS
This course focuses on becoming a better research producer and a research consumer from a psychological science perspective. Students will learn to think critically about media claims and accurately summarize primary source articles about behavior. Students will learn to use statistical software to accurately describe data. Students will learn to communicate effectively about research through written and oral work and make ethical judgments informed by APA ethical standards. Students will design and execute their own individual research studies.

Capstone

Developed in Conjunction with:

SO-401 Sociology Senior Seminar
Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S
Sociology Senior Seminar is the capstone course for students who have focused their academic work in the sociological discipline. The course provides an opportunity for students to apply key curricular components previously explored during their undergraduate sociology coursework. The course is a designated service learning and experiential learning course. Students will assume substantial responsibility for the exploration of materials and presentation of those materials to their student colleagues. Students will also interact with campus and community partners during the semester. The course uses a student-led seminar format, coupled with community engagement and service learning components. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

-- or --

PY-415 Capstone in Psychology
Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S,CS
The purpose of this course is to assess the skills students acquire during their undergraduate career in the Psychology Department. Students will be expected to produce a written professional work. Prerequisites: PY101 and PY309 and ND.SS214 and Senior standing.

-- or --

Thesis

Experiential Requirements (3-6 Credits)

Any Inside-Out Course

Inside-Out courses are offered within the walls of our two, nearby Pennsylvania State Correctional Institutions. Half of the students in these courses are "inside" incarcerated students, and half are "outside" students from our campus.

The four courses that have been offered thus far as Inside-out courses are:

SO-101 Introduction to Sociology
Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S
The study of human social groups and the social processes that lead to both structural and cultural integration and differentiation primarily within contemporary American society.

SO-244 Drugs and Society
Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S
This course explores the history of substance abuse, models of addiction, physiological effects of commonly abused substances and treatment effectiveness. Some of the programs that will be examined include the 12-step program. Prerequisites: SO101.

HS-266 History of South Africa
Fall; Variable; 3.00 Credits; I,H
This course covers the history of South Africa from the 17th century to the present. We will focus our attention on specific themes, including imperialism, race and ethnicity, crime and punishment, resistance to apartheid, and the limits of forgiveness. The class will be taught inside SCI Smithfield. This Inside-Out Course is an opportunity for a group of students from Juniata College and an equal number of students from SCI Smithfield to learn together and to exchange ideas and perceptions about the history of South Africa. Bringing incarcerated and non-incarcerated students together for engaged and informed dialogue allows for transformative learning experiences that facilitates an exchange of ideas in a dialogic format. Instructor permission required for all students.

HS-267 Gender of Crime/Prison
Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits
The class will be taught inside State Correctional Institute-Smithfield. This Inside-Out Course is an opportunity for a group of students from Juniata College and an equal number of students from SCI Smithfield to learn together and to exchange ideas and perceptions about the gender of crime, prisons, and reentry. Throughout the semester, we will use a gendered lens to explore understandings of criminality, incarceration, and reentry through an intersectional lens that will include discussions on race, class, national belonging, sex, and sexuality. Bringing incarcerated and non-incarcerated students together for engaged and informed dialogue allows for transformative learning experiences that facilitates an exchange of ideas in a dialogic format. Instructor permission required for all students.

More Inside-Out courses from multiple disciplines are being developed and will be offered in the future.

PS-190 Mock Trial
Fall & Spring; All Years; 1.00-3.00 Credits; CS
A study of elements related to the preparation of a trial through the Mock Trial setting governed by the American Mock Trial Association. Students will learn the preparation of pleadings, applicable case law to the case presented and obtain knowledge of the Rules of Evidence.

Juniata College's mock trial team has successfully competed in regional and national events. They have competed against a number of elite schools and Juniata has distinguished themselves as one of the leading schools in mock trial competition.


One of the follwing approved internships:

SO-492 Sociology Internship
Fall & Spring; Yearly; 2.00-9.00 Credits; S
Minimum GPA of 2.50 and good academic standing required for internship eligibility. Development of internship proposal must occur a minimum of six weeks prior to start of internship. Corequisite: SO495. Prerequisite: 2.50 GPA, Permission and Junior or Senior standing.

PY-495 Psychology Int. Sem.
Fall & Spring; Yearly; 2.00-6.00 Credits; S
Requires students to reflect on the internship experience and /or pursue research related to the placement. Corequisite: PY490. Prerequisite: permission.

PS-490 Legal & Public Affairs Internship
Fall & Spring; Yearly; 2.00-9.00 Credits; S
An opportunity to apply concepts and theories learned in class and readings to a practical situation. Selected students work with chief administrative officers in State College and Huntingdon, police departments, environmental departments, legal offices or in the Court House. Note: may be repeated up to a total of 9 hours credit. Corequisite: PS495. Prerequisite: permission and Jr. or Sr. Standing.


Electives (15-18 Credits)

EB 2XX Alternative Dispute Resolution (this course is now under development)


EN-239 Bloody Murder
Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; H
The United States has always been a violent nation, and American writers have used that violence to explore questions of justice, truth, and human nature. This course will examine the portrayal of violence in writers from Poe to Cormac McCarthy.


HS-302 Crime/European History
Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; H,I,CW
Law is a creation of society, and works to enforce social and moral rules. In this course we will explore how crime and punishment were defined and carried out in Europe and the United States from Roman times to present. The course will take students through a series of case studies, beginning with Roman and Germanic law and ending with an examination of the fictive U.S. court case of the Speluncean Explorers. In the meantime we will explore definitions of crime, theories of just and unjust punishments, the development of state-sponsored justice, and the invention of rehabilitation. The course will be entirely discussion-based. Prerequisites: HS104 or HS151.


HS-400 Crimes Against Humanity
Spring; Variable; 4.00 Credits; I,H
This course explores the emergence, evolution, varieties, underlying causes, and means of confronting and coming to terms with genocide and other crimes against humanity. During the course of the semester, we will examine a range of historical contexts and we will also confront tough questions about ethics, resistance, and responsibility. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing. Sophomores require permission.


PACS-105 Introduction to Conflict Resolution
Either Semester; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S
A survey of the field of conflict, this course explores the causes and consequences of social conflict. Theory and case studies are used to understand interpersonal disputes, the intricacies of groups in conflict and international issues and crisis. Emphasis is given to understanding the basic theoretical concepts of the field and developing basic conflict resolving skills.


PACS-110 Introduction to Peace ∧ Conflict Studies
Either Semester; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; I
A survey of the literature, issues and people that make up the field of Peace and Conflict Studies. The course looks at the theory, language, and methodologies that have developed around the academic inquiry into war and deep-rooted conflict as human problems and peace as a human potential.


PS-218 Public Policy & Admin.
Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S
An introduction to the study of public policy and its administration. The course explores the ways which power, knowledge and institutions shape adoption and evolution of public policies in western democracies. Focusing on various policy areas, the course also surveys the public bureaucracies that administer these policies, examining what government agencies do and why they do it, and assesses alternatives to public bureaucracies. Prerequisite: PS101.


PS-312 Constitutional Interpretation: Civil Rights
Variable; Variable; 4.00 Credits; H,CW
Examines citizen's rights and liberties which the Constitution protects against infringement by the government. Those freedoms enumerated in the Bill of Rights are reviewed as well as the right to privacy, due process, and equal protection. Prerequisites: PS101 or permission.


PS-334 Human Rights
Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; I,S
This class focuses on some of the debates concerning human rights: realism versus idealism; individualism versus communitarianism; universalism versus relativism; religious fundamentalism versus secularism; women's rights as human rights; liberalism versus socialism. We review the historical evolution of human rights. We devote part of the semester to the role of literature and the arts in creating and promoting human rights. Prerequisite: PS102.


PY-203 Abnormal Psychology
Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S
A brief consideration is given to the historical approaches to " mental illness, " followed by a consideration of present day classification, diagnostic measures, and therapy. Emphasis throughout is upon experimental data as applied to the various disorders. Prerequisite: PY101.


PY-205 Social Psychology
Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S
The study of human interaction and interpersonal relationships, including selected areas of current research and theory such as social perception, interpersonal communication, attitude formation and change, conformity, aggression, and interpersonal attraction. Prerequisite: PY101.


PY-410 Aggression and Prejudice
Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S,CS
This is an upper level seminar course limited to juniors and seniors. The course focus is on primary source readings from social psychology and political psychology that address the breadth of the human condition from compassion and empathy to political extremism and genocide. Topics include prejudice (racism, sexism, etc.), authoritarianism, social dominance, compassion, humanitarianism and human values.


SO-203 Minority Experiences
Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S
An exploration of the factors that shape the experiences of minority group members in both domestic and global contexts. The social processes that functions to construct minority identity among racial, ethnic, gender, and ability groups are studied. Prerequisites: SO101 or AN151.


SO-244 Drugs and Society
Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S
This course explores the history of substance abuse, models of addiction, physiological effects of commonly abused substances and treatment effectiveness. Some of the programs that will be examined include the 12-step program. Prerequisites: SO101.


SO-362 Juvenile Justice
Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; CW,S
The issues, trends, and challenges facing juvenile justice professionals are explored in this course. The history and philosophy of juvenile justice, processing, detention, and diversion of juvenile offenders are topics of the course. Prerequisite: SO 260.


SO-320 Wealth, Power, & Society
Fall; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S,CW
An investigation of the stratification of American society. The roots and repercussions of social inequalities are studied with special emphasis given to inequalities relating to social class, race, ethnicity and gender. Social structures through which these inequalities are sustained are critically examined. Prerequisites: SO101 and Sophomore, Junior, or Senior standing.


SO 3XX Comparative Criminal Justice (this course is now under development)


SO 2XX Victimology (this course is now under development)