Education

 

ED-110 Foundations of Education
Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3 Credits; S; 
Discusses the historical and contemporary bases of major political, economic, legal, sociological, and psychological issues affecting public school systems. Students review current issues in education and write a personal philosophy statement. Corequisite: ED111.


ED-111 Foundations of Education Field Experience
Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1 Credit; S; 
Provides a classroom experience for freshmen and students who are interested in education to explore teaching as a career and observe the application of multiple philosophies, theories, and teaching strategies. Corequisite: ED-110

There are field experiences in this course. Students should take only one of these courses per semester. Allow a two-hour block of time for scheduled field experience twice a week.


ED-130 Adolescent Development
Fall & Spring; Yealy; 3 Credits; S; 
Examines human physical, cognitive, and social-emotional development from preadolescence through emerging adulthood. Topics include: identity, sexuality, and gender issues; emotional and behavioral challenges of adolescence, the impact of culture, language, and disability on adolescents, and the role of family, schools, and peers on development. Enrollment priority in this course is given to Education POEs.


ED-201 Educational Technology
Either Semester; Yearly; 3 Credits; S; 
Introduces educational technology and computer systems and their current applications in the classroom. Topics to be covered include office programs, Web 2.0 programs, multimedia programs, course management systems and web-page construction; classroom presentation software; use of assistive technology and software evaluation. Prerequisites: ED110 and ED111 or ED101 and ED120 and ED121. ED130 may be taken as an alternate prerequisite for ED120/ED121 only.


ED-240 Introduction to Students With Exceptionalities
Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3 Credits; S; 
Introduces the culture of exceptionalities within the public special education system. Historical, philosophical, educational, and legal perspectives will be presented. Students will learn the categories of exceptionalities, general characteristics of individuals with exceptionalities eligibility criteria, and the referral process for special education services. Professional and community resources, inclusion and other current issues will be discussed. Prerequisites: ED110 and ED111 and ED120 and ED121 or ED130.


ED-314 English Language Learners
Either Semester; Yearly; 1 Credit; S; 
Focuses on the historical, legal, and cultural issues pertaining to meeting the educational needs of English language learners. Students are be introduced to research based best practices in instruction and assessment strategies for working with English language learners in the general education classroom setting. Prerequisite: ED120 or ED130.


ED-315 ELL Field Experience
Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1 Credit; S; 
Provide students with 30 hours of field experience and participation in a variety of multi-cultural and multi-lingual environments in order to broadentheir own experiences, prepare to teach English learners, and work with diverse families. Students accumulate required hours throughout their program, but they formally register for course credit during student teaching or their final semester at Juniata College. Prerequisites: ED314. Graded S (satisfactory) or U(unsatisfactory).


ED-341 Adaptations for Students With Exceptionalities
Spring; Yearly; 4 Credits; CW, S; 
The purpose of this course is to learn how to develop and manage effective inclusive learning environments for students with disabilities at the secondary level. Content will focus on the knowledge and skills necessary to create an instructional environment that communicates challenging expectations to students while utilizing and modifying research based instructional strategies/resources/technologies. Students will learn the critical components of effective collaboration with parents and professionals. Successful completion of a field experience in an educational setting is also a requirement. Prerequisites: ED110, ED111 and ED240.

There are field experiences in this course. Students should take only one of these courses per semester. Allow a two-hour block of time for scheduled field experience twice a week.


ED-419A Secondary Pre-Student Teaching
Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1 Credits; S; 
Secondary PRE-student-teaching practicum (1 credit): This is a required 80-hour minimum practicum in the linked placement where you will be going for student teaching. Students should plan to spend 4 consecutive hours in their placement each week. Co-requisite: ED 420. Note: Reliable transportation is REQUIRED.

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ED-419B Secondary Pre-Student Teaching
Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1 Credit; S; 
Secondary PRE-student-teaching practicum (1 credit): This is a required 80-hour minimum practicum in the linked placement where you will be going for student teaching. Students should plan to spend 4 consecutive hours in their placement each week.  Co-requisite: ED 420. Note: Reliable transportation is REQUIRED.


ED-420 General Secondary Methods
Spring; Yearly; 3 Credits; S; 
Requires the application and practice of evaluation and assessment of learning and classroom management. Students are required to complete a field experience in their upcoming student teaching placement. Prerequisites: ED341 and junior or senior standing. Corequisite: ED419. Note: Students must have reliable transportation. (3.0 overall GPA required).

There are field experiences in this course. Students should take only one of these courses per semester. Allow a two-hour block of time for scheduled field experience twice a week.


(optional)

ED-423 Secondary Education Field Trip
Spring; Yearly; 1 Credit; S; 
Secondary Education Field Trip (1 credit): Join in an interdisciplinary course that will design and execute a field trip for local secondary students. This is a practical application course that will highlight the importance of field trips and provide an opportunity for designing and executing a successful field trip.  


ED-450 Student Teaching
Fall & Spring; Yearly; 14 Credits; S; 
Student teaching is the capstone experience for students preparing for certification to teach in their content area(s). Students synthesize and apply knowledge of developmental theory, content, and teaching methodology as they design, implement, and evaluate learning experiences in an intensive internship in the classroom. Corequisite: ED451 and completion of all clearances and requirements. Note: A special fee is assessed. Secondary level student teaching is in the fall semester; PreK-4th, and foreign language education student teaching is in the spring semester. Students must have access to reliable transportation.  

ED-450 may be taken only in the FALL semester of the senior year. ED 450 requires students' full-time participation and no other courses may be taken during this semester without the education advisors' approval. Students must have reliable transportation.


ED-451 Student Teaching Seminar
Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1 Credit; S; 
In conjunction with student teaching, students attend weekly seminars that are led by the college supervisors. These meetings focus on professional topics and allow students to reflect upon and share their student teaching experience. In addition, students develop interviewing techniques, become familiar with employment seeking strategies, and develop a portfolio that includes but is not limited to a resume, a philosophy of education statement, lesson plans, and documentation of professional experiences. Corequisite: ED450.

ED-451 may be taken only in the FALL semester of the senior year.

 

English

 

EN-120 Forms of Literature
Fall; Yearly; 3 Credits; H; 
An introduction to the study of literary forms, including poetry, drama, short story, novel, novella, and essay. Students will read texts from a wide variety of genres and historical periods, to examine how litereay forms developed and gain/lost popularity over time. Students will learn the vocabulary and technique of literary analysis.  


EN-122 Interpreting Pop Literature
Fall; Yearly; 3 Credits; H; 
Utilizing Harry Potter, The Hunger Games, World War Z, and other popular works of fiction for class, this introductory course will engage students in the fundamental terms and approaches needed to analyze, appreciate and discuss works of fiction at the college level. Students will study introductory elements of literary theory, emphasizing using various social and theoretical perspectives, as a means of learning how to identify cultural and literary meaning within texts.  


EN-170 World Literatures
Spring; Yearly; 3 Credits; H, I; 
Studies works of African, Asian, Latin American, South American,Caribbean and Native American literature. Discussions focus on ways literature reveals cultural perspectives and philosophies.  


EN-200 History of the Language
Spring; Odd Years; 3 Credits; H, I; 
Like other languages, English is not monolithic, and it is always on the move. This course examines how English functions now, both in its Standard form and in many of its varieties around the world; how its sounds and structures have changed from its Proto-Indo-European beginnings; and what major factors have influenced those changes. Prerequisites: FYC101, EN110, or EN109.


EN-204 English Colloquium
Fall; Yearly; 1 Credit; H; 
The English Colloquium prepares students for academic expectations in the English department and introduces them to professional opportunities within the discipline. This colloquium is intended for students with English, Secondary Education/English or Professional Writing POEs, individualized POEs with foundation in literature or writing, or students with secondary emphases in English. Pre-requisites: sophomore standing, one EN course beyond EN110, or instructor's permission.


American Literature Course of Choice:

EN-238 Unnatural Acts
Fall; Yearly; 3 Credits; H; 
From the Puritans to tree-huggers, America has been divided between those who see Nature as moral and liberating, and those who see society as the taming of savage, godless wilderness. This course will examine that tension in writers from Hawthorne and Melville to Faulkner.  

EN-239 Bloody Murder
Spring; Yearly; 3 Credits; H; 
The United States has always been a violent nation, and American writers have used that violence to explore questions of justice, truth, and human nature. This course will examine the portrayal of violence in writers from Poe to Cormac McCarthy.  

EN-250 African American Literature
Fall; Odd Years; 3 Credits; CA, H; 
A survey of African American literature from the mid-18th century to the present, with emphasis on both the vernacular/oral and written traditions of African American literature and attention to the historical and cultural contexts in which the literature was created. Readings include folktales, slave narratives, autobiographies, poetry, stories, novels, essays, sermons and speeches, hymns and spirituals, as well as blues and gospel music and works by such writers as Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. Dubois, Zora Neale Hurston, Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, James Baldwin, Gwendolyn Brooks, Toni Morrison, Alice Walker, Amiri Baraka, and others. Prerequisites: EN110.

EN-251 Slave Narratives
Spring; Odd Years; 3 Credits; H, CW; 
The personal autobiographies of American slaves are the foundational works of the African American literary tradition, and they have influenced generations of American authors. Originally written as a means of promoting the abolition of slavery, contemporary writers have taken this historical form and transformed it to reflect upon the past and engage with problems of the present. Neo-slave narratives are a reminder that, as Faulkner writes, " The past is never dead. It's not even past. " In this course, we will read a variety of original slave narratives and put them in dialogue with contemporary fictionalized slave narratives. In doing so, we will explore topics such as the boundaries between fact and fiction, the political uses of literature, the afterlife of slavery, and many others. Prerequisites: EN110 or EN109.

EN-253 Literature of the Jazz Age
Spring; Even Years; 3 Credits; H; 
Called the " Jazz Age " by F. Scott Fitzgerald, the 1920s were marked by great cultural change. In response to the trauma of the First World War, the " lost generation " broke traditional social barriers while embracing radically new forms of art. Beginning in 1920 (the year both women's suffrage and prohibition were passed as constitutional amendments) and concluding with the 1929 stock market crash that signaled the start of the Great Depression, we will examine the role of the Harlem Renaissance in inspiring and sustaining domestic and expatriate American modernism. With special emphasis on the interplay of art, music, and literature, this class will examine the literature of the Jazz Age across genre " and racial " boundaries, concluding with two contemporary works that evaluate the lasting significance of this era on American culture. Prerequisite: EN110 or EN109.


EN-258 Funny Pages
Variable; Variable; 3 Credits; H; 
Everyone loves comedy--even college professors. But comedy isn't just pratfalls and punchlines. It's a distinctive literary form with its own conventions, traditions, and variety of approaches. There's wit, parody, farce, satire, black comedy, and all the things in between. In this course we'll look at some of the greatest comedy ever written (and filmed, too), all brought to you by the greatest humorists the English language has ever produced--the British.  

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EN-262 Unhappily Ever After
Spring; Odd Years; 3 Credits; H; 
Deaths. Betrayals. Loves lost. Falls from grace. These calamities, and those that suffer them, have captivated dramatists, novelists, philosophers, and theoreticians since the first tragedy was staged in ancient Athens over 2,500 years ago. This course will explore how literary cultures have understood and expressed notions of tragedy in different historical periods. By examining the ways in which we inflict and endure suffering, we will consider how literary tragedy informs our understanding of the human condition.  


Writing Course of Choice: EN*


EN-341 Shakespearean Drama
Spring; Yearly; 3 Credits; H; 
Examines historical moments, cultural perspectives, and theatrical constructs that shaped the writing, acting, and reception of Shakespeare's comedies, tragedies, and history plays. Prerequisite: EN110 or EN109.


Literature Course of Choice: EN

*Although any EN writing course would satisfy the requirement, we suggest EN 306 (Creative Nonfiction Writing), EN 311 (Pro News and Feature Writing), or EN 315 (Technical Writing) as particularly wise choices for EN/Sec Ed students.

 

CM-200 Art of Public Speaking
Either Semester; Yearly; 3 Credits; CS, H; 
Seeks to develop and improve fundamental principles and methods of selecting, organizing, developing, and communicating a line of reasoning and evidence for constructive influence in speaking situations. Students make three formal presentations, analyze messages, and improve their listening skills Prerequisites: Sophomore, Junior, or Senior standing.


Math Course of Choice

 

Suggested course sequence to complete EN and ED requirements.

For students entering on an Even-Odd Academic Year (e.g. 2018-2019)

Class Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits
First Year (Even-Odd Year) ED 110 3 ED 130 3
ED 111 1 EN 122 3
EN 110 4 Math course of choice 3
EN 120 3    
Sophomore (Odd-Even Year) ED 201 3 ED 314 1
ED 240 3 ED 341 4
EN 204 1 EN 170 World Lit 3
EN literature course of choice 3 EN British literature course of choice 3
Math course of choice 3    
Junior (Even-Odd Year) EN literature course of choice 3 ED 419A or 419B 1
EN American literature course of choice 3 ED 420 3
    EN 200 3
    EN Writing course of choice 3
Senior (Odd-Even Year) ED 315 1 EN 341 3
ED 450 14    
ED 451 1    

For students entering on an Odd-Even Academic Year (e.g. 2019-2020)

Class Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits
First Year (Odd-Even Year) ED 110 3 ED 130 3
ED 111 1 EN 122 3
EN 110 4 EN 170 3
EN 120 3 Math course of choice 3
Sophomore (Even-Odd Year) ED 201 3 ED 314 1
ED 240 3 ED 341 4
EN 204 1 EN British literature course of choice 3
EN American literature course of choice 3    
Math course of choice 3    
Junior (Odd-Even Year) EN literature course of choice 3 ED 419A or 419B 1
EN literature course of choice 3 ED 420 3
    EN 200 3
    EN Writing course of choice 3
Senior (Even-Odd Year) ED 315 1 EN 341 3
ED 450 14    
ED 451 1