The Astronomy Secondary Emphasis at Juniata College will: 

  • provide a rigorous yet broad introduction to astronomy, where the theoretical background is complemented by hands-on, observational experience. 
  • be situated within the liberal arts tradition of Juniata College, and include an exploration of the role of astronomy in culture and the opportunity to study abroad. 
  • offer a pathway to coursework and experiences that will appeal to and add value for students who plan to attend graduate school in astronomy or astrophysics. 
  • be available to students in all disciplines through a sequence of courses that have less mathematical rigor and few prerequisites, as well as the opportunity to fulfill general education credits while completing the secondary emphasis.

A student who has completed the Astronomy Secondary Emphasis at Juniata College will be able to: 

  • apply critical thinking and quantitative reasoning skills to problems in astronomy.
  • clearly articulate scientific ideas both orally and in writing.
  • explain the apparent motion of celestial objects as seen from Earth.
  • connect the laws of physics to specific astronomical processes and phenomena.
  • use telescopes, cameras, and spectrometers to observe, analyze, and interpret the light received from celestial objects.
  • understand the role of astronomy in human cultures, past and present.

Courses

The Astronomy Secondary Emphasis will be comprised of sixteen credits in required core classes, and at least six additional credits from elective courses, for a minimum of 22 credits. In keeping with college policy, at least six credits must be upper-level coursework.

 

Core Courses

 

PC-200 General Physics I

An algebra-based introduction to the basic principles of mechanics (including periodic motion, fluid static's and dynamics), heat and thermodynamics, molecular theory and wave motion (including acoustics). Note: a working knowledge of algebra and trigonometry is required. 

3 CreditsN, QMCorequisite: PC200L.

+

PC-200L  General Physics Lab I

An introductory algebra-based laboratory experience designed to accompany PC200. The individual experiments will involve topics in mechanics, energy, sound, and waves. Labs Involve computer acquisition of data for some experiments. Note: A special fee is assessed. 

1 CreditNCorequisites: PC200.

AND

PC-201 General Physics II

An algebra-based introduction to basic principles of electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic waves, and optics. Additional topics may include atoms and molecules, nuclear physics, relativity and solid state physics. Note: a working knowledge of algebra and trigonometry is required. 

3 CreditsN, QMCorequisite: PC201L. Prerequisite: PC200.

+

PC-201L  General Physics Lab II

An algebra-based introductory laboratory experience designed to accompany PC201. The individual experiments will involve topics in circuits, light and optics, and nuclear physics. Involves computer acquisition of data for some experiments. Note: A special fee is assessed. 

1 CreditNCorequisite: PC201.


OR


PC-202 Intro Physics I

A calculus-based introduction to the basic principles of mechanics (including periodic motion and dynamics), heat and thermodynamics, and special relativity. 

3 CreditsN, QMCorequisite: PC-202L and Corequisite or Prerequisite: MA130.

+

PC-202L Intro Physics Lab I

This lab is a calculus-based introductory laboratory experience that is designed to accompany PC202. Individual experiments will correlate with the course, including kinematics, Newton's Laws, energy, and momentum. Note: A special fee is assessed. 

1 CreditNCorequisite: PC202.

OR

PC-204 University Physics

A calculus-based introduction to the basic principles of mechanics (including periodic motion, statics, and dynamics), heat and thermodynamics, and special relativity. This course includes an integrated introductory laboratory experience. This course is designed to be taken by students interested in a POE in Physics or Engineering Physics. Note: a special fee is assessed. 

4 CreditsN, QM, WK-FRCorequisite: MA-130

AND

PC-203 Intro Physics II

A calculus-based introduction to basic principles of electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic waves and optics. Additional topics may include atoms and molecules, nuclear physics, relativity and solid state physics. Corequisite: PC-207 or PC-203L. 

3 CreditsN, QMPrerequisites or Corequisite: Take MA-230 and either PC-202 or PC-204.

+

PC-203L Intro Physics Lab II

An algebra-based introductory laboratory experience designed to accompany PC203. The individual experiments will involve topics in circuits, light and optics, and nuclear physics. Note: A special fee is assessed. 

1 CreditNPrerequisite: PC202. Corequisite: PC203.


PC-160 Measuring the Universe

This course explores what astronomers know about the size and scale of our Solar System, the Milky Way Galaxy, and the Universe as a whole. Hands-on exercises introduce students to the tools and techniques used to measure such immense distances.

4 CreditsN,WK-SPPre-req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

 

 

Elective Courses

 

CA-227  Archaeoastronomy

An exploration of the role of astronomy and astronomers in early human cultures through an analysis of the scientific, historical, and social contexts in which these cultures existed. After a review of the principles of celestial mechanics as applied to the motion of the sun, moon, planets, and stars through the sky, we will study in depth the practice of astronomy in three ancient cultures, including their calendars, architecture, religion, and myths.

3 CreditsCA,N


AS-300 Chile: Southern Stars I

This Global Engagement course sequence (2-credit predeparture course in fall or spring semester plus a 2-credit short-term study abroad course in winter or summer term) is designed to provide students with a multidisciplinary exploration of astronomy and nature, the human experience, and literary expression in Chile. Students will study astronomy, the history of Chile, and expressions of Chilean culture in film, essay, and poetry with a focus on the relationship to the night sky. During two weeks in Chile, students will engage in astronomical observations, literary discussions, and cultural activities. Travels to international observatories, pre-Columbian archaeoastronomy sites, natural wonders such as the Humboldt Penguin Reserve and the Tatio Geysers, historical landmarks, and cultural events will expose students to diverse aspects of Chile's natural environment and cultural production.

2 CreditsI,N,SWGSAPrereq: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109. (Must complete both AS-300 and AS-301 to fulfill one of the Global Engagement requirements.)

+

AS-301 Chile: Southern Stars II

This Global Engagement course sequence (2-credit predeparture course in fall or spring semester plus a 2-credit short-term study abroad course in winter or summer term) is designed to provide students with a multidisciplinary exploration of astronomy and nature, the human experience, and literary expression in Chile. Students will study astronomy, the history of Chile, and expressions of Chilean culture in film, essay, and poetry with a focus on the relationship to the night sky. During two weeks in Chile, students will engage in astronomical observations, literary discussions, and cultural activities. Travels to international observatories, pre-Columbian archaeoastronomy sites, natural wonders such as the Humboldt Penguin Reserve and the Tatio Geysers, historical landmarks, and cultural events will expose students to diverse aspects of Chile's natural environment and cultural production.

2 CreditsI,N,SWGSAPrereq: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109. (Must complete both AS-300 and AS-301 to fulfill one of the Global Engagement requirements.)


AS-350 Astronomy Research I

Observational, computational, or theoretical research into a topic in astronomy or astrophysics, under the guidance of a faculty member. May be taken multiple times for credit.

2-4 Credits Instructor permission required.


AS-390 Astrophysics

This course explores the applications of physics to fundamental processes that occur in celestial objects. Topics may include celestial mechanics, radiation laws and spectra, stellar formation and evolution, the solar system, compact objects, extragalactic astronomy and galaxies, and cosmology.

4 CreditsNPre-reqs: PC-300 and MA-235.


AS-450 Astronomy Research II

Observational, computational, or theoretical research into a topic in astronomy or astrophysics, under the guidance of a faculty member. A formal written report and public presentation of research results are required. May be taken multiple times for credit.

2-4 CreditsPre-requisites: AS-350 and permission of instructor.


CONN-310A Revolution! Part 1

Revolution! will look at the structure of revolutions, broadly construed. The course will focus on four specific revolutions in the natural and life sciences, followed by a short-term study abroad experience in Eastern Europe, including Vienna, Brno, Prague and Budapest, during summer term. Students will produce a script and podcast focusing on a specific revolution. NOTE: Students are expected to be in their third or fourth year when taking a Connections course.

1 CreditH,N,CW,IC,CONNStudents must take both CONN-310A and CONN-310B to fulfill the IC requirement or the Connections general education requirement.

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CONN-310B Revolution! Part 2

Revolution! Part 2 is the follow-up course to CONN-310A and is a short-term study abroad experience in Eastern Europe (including Vienna, Brno, Prague and Budapest) during summer term.

2 CreditsH,N,CW,IC,CONNPre-Req: CONN-310A. Students must take both CONN-310A and CONN-310B to fulfill the IC or Connections general education requirement. Students are expected to be in their third or fourth year when taking this course.

 

Courses in Geology, Biology, Chemistry, Data Science, and possibly other disciplines may be approved as electives if they have a substantial astronomy content or are closely related to astronomy topics.