Cultural Analysis(CA)

Faculty:

Provost Lauren Bowen - ext. 3123

Interdisciplinary Colloquia (IC) and (CA)

Students will need to choose one course from a listing of courses known as Interdisciplinary Colloquia (IC) and one course from a listing known as Cultural Analysis (CA).  In the IC course, faculty from different disciplines work with students in a team-taught and interdisciplinary setting to tackle a significant topic while developing writing, discussion, close reading, and critical thinking skills.   The CA courses focus on some aspect of culture or offer an introduction to a culture by using both scholarly and primary texts from that culture and are also committed to developing writing skills. 

The IC and CA courses require sophomore standing and above and can be taken  in any order or  even at the same time.  The Interdisciplinary Colloquium and Cultural Analysis requirement will be waived for students who successfully complete a world language course beyond the 210 level in the target language and a semester or more of study abroad in the  target language and culture.  Please note that the credits (7  to 8 credits) need to be earned elsewhere to earn the needed 120 for graduation.

PLEASE NOTE:  To find Interdisciplinary Colloquia courses and Cultural Analysis that are offered in the home department, please use CLASS SCHEDULES and look under SKILLS.

Interdisciplinary Colloquia Courses:

IC-202   Shaping the American Mind (Fall; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; IC) Beginning in the seventeenth century scientific revolution, continuing with a look at the enlightenment thinkers that brought notions of liberty, economics and pluralism to the United States, this course uses the history of ideas to ask why we Americans are and what ideas helped make us this way. Prerequisites: EN110 or EN109.

IC-204   Evolution and American Culture (Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; IC) The Darwinian Revolution, based on Darwinian evolutionary theory, is one of the greatest and most profound human achievements. But today, more than 150 years after the publication of Darwin's Origin of Species, we still have not come to terms with its mind-boggling implications and not fully explored its awesome explanatory power in transforming our thinking of many big issues (e.g. sex and marriage, family, gender, race, morality, human nature, religion, meaning of life, etc.). This course will accomplish something far more interesting than to debate or argue for the truth of evolution theory or how to accommodate our traditional religious beliefs to the framework of evolution and science. To accomplish our objective, we will first trace the development of Darwinian evolutionary theory and reconstruct the Darwinian paradigm. We will then study and explain the nature of the conservative religious and other forms of cultural reactions to Darwinian theory in American culture. And finally, we will investigate the many culturally significant and profound implications of the Darwinian Revolution in our society. Prerequisites: EN-110 or EN109.

IC-205   Modern Knowledge & the Self (Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; IC,CW) Who are we? In what kind of world do we live? What can we know about the world and ourselves and how? This course examines how the modern has changed our answers to these and other questions. Particular attention will be paid to modern and post-modern understandings of scientific and narrative knowledge as well as cultural transformations in the comprehension of the self. Materials include films, novels, essays, and the visual arts. Prerequisites: EN110 or EN109.

IC-206   Remote Field Course Seminar (Variable; Yearly; 2.00 Credits; CW,IC,SW-US) Join us in learning about the U.S. Southwest (New Mexico, Arizona, Utah, and Colorado) and plan on visiting the sites discussed in class and examining the impact on the indigenous people. The course uses an interdisciplinary approach, pulling from the expertise of physics, biology, psychology, and education. The RFC seminar course (IC-206) is scheduled during the spring semester and is paired with IC-207 during the summer term, during which students and instructors travel to the various locations studied during the seminar. Students must take both IC-206 and IC-207 to fulfill the IC or the U.S. Experience general education requirement. The total fee for the experience is split between the two courses, with half on the spring semester billing and the other half on the summer term billing.

IC-207   Remote Field Course (YYearly; 1.00-2.00 Credits; IC,CW,SW-US) This course builds on the introduction to the Southwest the students began in IC-206, by taking them to the field to explore the biology, geology, anthropology, and history of the Southwest desert region from a variety of perspectives. Students explore how humans have historically interacted in this arid environment and how modern culture has placed environmental burdens on the region's resources. This course culminates in a field trip to Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah. Half of the total fee is charged with IC-206 in the spring and the other half with IC-207 in the summer. Students must take both IC-206 and IC-207 to fulfill the IC or the U.S. Experience general education requirement. Prerequisite: IC-206.

IC-208   The History of God (Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; IC) This course will give students an introduction to the concept of God in western culture and how our understanding of God has changed from the ancient Hebrews to the modern era. Topics will include how concepts of God have been influenced by politics and culture; the interrelationship between popular and intellectual religion; and how religious belief influences, and is influenced by power. Prerequisite: EN110 or EN109.

IC-210   Comics and Culture (Spring; Variable; 4.00 Credits; IC) This course will explore the rule of comics in shaping and reflecting American culture. It will explore the basic structure of comics and graphic novels, the historical birth and evolution of the American comic book, and the counter culture response to these comics. Students will write and draw a short story in comic book format as well as write short assignments and a research paper. Prerequisite: EN110 or EN109. A special fee for supplies and a field trip will apply.

IC-214   Global Climate Change (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; IC,CONN) This course examines the science and politics of global climate change, including data and analyses in the assessment reports of the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. The course also examines how governments and other political actors craft and shape policies related to climate change. Special attention will be placed on the extent to which public policy is influenced by scientific evidence and political considerations. NOTE: Students are expected to be in their third or fourth year when taking a Connections course.

IC-216   Wine in a Vessel (Fall; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; IC) This course is designed to introduce and foster the introspective practices, theories, and discourse of wine and ceramic vessels as known to man through the ages. These activities have shaped human culture on Earth for thousands of years; students will explore this tradition through wine-making, pottery, and cultural analyses of imbibing. This is a hands-on course that will involve interactive participation in Juniata's vineyard and Ceramic Studio, where wine and containment vessels will be created. Students will write a research paper of their chosen subject-matter (as pertinent to course topics) and are required to keep a journal of their chosen discipline throughout the semester. Both will incorporate revisions, peer and individual. Prerequisites: EN110 or EN109 and permission of instructor. Students must be 21 years of age to take this course.

IC-220   Interpreting the Bible & Constitution (Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; IC) Both the Bible and the Constitution have been interpreted very differently at different times and by different people. How can we know which interpretations are right? Is there even such a thing as a " right " interpretation? This course examines the art of interpretation and critically evaluates some common and conflicting interpretations of the Bible and the Constitution. Prerequisites: EN110 or EN109.

IC-223   Islam: Real and Imagined (Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; IC) This course is designed to introduce students to Islam and to the political and cultural heritage of the Islamic world, both in practice and in theory, and from the perspective of both insiders and outsiders. It includes the basics of Islam and the history of the Islamic world's interaction with the West in the recent past. Throughout the course, we will connect the topics and themes of the early era with the concerns of our own era. Focus will not just be on the Middle East, but will also include Islam in the United States and around the world.

IC-225   Theatre of the Observed (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; IC,CONN) Is empathy a thought or an action? Is it something we have, give, enact, or embody? How is empathy communicated? In this course, we examine the nuances of empathy through reading, speaking, observing, and embodied action. The course brings together methods of social inquiry and creative expression in order to produce an original verbatim theatrical performances and reflection on the human experience known as empathy. NOTE: Students are expected to be in their third or fourth year when taking a Connections course.

IC-229   Spanish & Service in Guatemala I (Spring; Even Years; 1.00 Credit; IC,SW-GE) This spring module serves as extended orientation and preparation for the two-week intensive Spanish and service learning module, IC-230, that will take place immediately following commencement. Students must have intermediate Spanish proficiency equivalent to four semesters of college Spanish or enroll concurrently for a fourth-semester Spanish course. Prerequisites: Completion of SP-230 or a Spanish course beyond SP-230 taught in the target language. Corequisite: IC-230.

IC-230   Spanish & Service in Guatemala II (Summer; Even Years; 2.00 Credits; IC,SW-GE) This two-week summer module in Guatemala follows IC-229, the spring module that provides extended orientation and preparation for this intensive Spanish and service learning experience. Students must have successfully completed IC-229 and have intermediate Spanish proficiency equivalent to four semesters of college Spanish to participate in the course. Prerequisites: Completion of SP-230 or a Spanish course beyond SP-230 taught in the target language. Corequisite: IC-229.

IC-275   Project Management (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; IC,CW,CS) This course examines the challenges of providing project management in the information age of global and cultural contexts. Project management as manifested in today's workplace provides both opportunity, and a great responsibility. The role and function of project managers looks very different today than years ago. Change is the norm. Project managers must understand today's challenges and be able to function effectively given a borderless, multicultural, virtual, and diverse group of team members. Prerequisites: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109. This course is not for IT or CS POE students.

IC-290   Czech Castle Collections I (Spring; Variable; 1.00 Credit; IC,SW-GE) This spring semester course provides a basic introduction to the art, music, history, and culture of the Czech Republic and Lobkowicz Collections. IC-290 provides orientation and preparation for IC-291, the two-week experiential learning trip to the Czech Republic that occurs in the summer term. NOTES: Students will earn one credit in spring semester with on-campus meetings and two credits in summer term for the trip that will occur during the summer session. The total fee for the experience is split between the two courses, with half on the spring semester billing and the other half on the summer term billing.

IC-291   Czech Castle Collections II (Summer; Variable; 2.00 Credits; IC,SW-GE) This course is a two-week experiential learning trip to the Czech Republic that occurs in the summer term. Prereq: IC-290. NOTE: Students will earn one credit in spring semester with on-campus meetings and two credits in summer term for the trip that will occur during the summer session. The total fee for the experience is split between the two courses, with half on the spring semester billing and the other half on the summer term billing.

Cultural Analysis Courses:

CA-270   Infectious Disease & Society (Either Semester; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; CA,N,CTGES,WK-SP) This course focuses primarily on the impact of ten human infectious diseases that have changed the world. Each disease is analyzed from five distinct perspectives: Clinical, Historical, Economic, Artistic, and Public Health. We also discuss genomics aspects of the infective organisms and of their human hosts.