Juniata College Online Catalog 2021-2022

Juniata's Mission:

Juniata's mission is to provide an engaging personalized educational experience empowering our students to develop the skills, knowledge and values that lead to a fulfilling life of service and ethical leadership in the global community.

 


Juniata is an independent, privately supported, coeducational institution committed to providing a liberal arts education to qualified students regardless of sex, religion, race, color, national origin, ancestry, marital status, sexual orientation or disability. College policies comply with the requirements of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, and all other applicable federal, state and local statutes, regulations and guidelines. A complete affirmative action policy is available in the Office of Human Resources.

Catalog provisions are not to be regarded as an irrevocable contract between the student and Juniata. While every attempt has been made to assure correct information, the College reserves the right to change any provisions or requirements when deemed appropriate.

The College

Juniata's Mission

Juniata's mission is to provide an engaging personalized educational experience empowering our students to develop the skills, knowledge and values that lead to a fulfilling life of service and ethical leadership in the global community.

 

Brief History

Juniata is an independent, co-educational college of liberal arts and sciences, founded in 1876 by members of the Church of the Brethren to prepare individuals “for the useful occupations of life.”

Juniata’s first classes were held on April 17, 1876 in a cramped, second-story room over a local printing shop. Two women and one man were in attendance. Unlike the common model at the time, Juniata was co-educational from the beginning. In 1879, classes were moved to Founders Hall (completely restored in 2009) on the present Juniata campus in Huntingdon. The town is a county seat of 10,000 and lies in the scenic Central Pennsylvania mountains, mid-way between Interstate 80 and the Pennsylvania Turnpike.

The Juniata community now has over 40 buildings on over 800 acres, including the 316-acre Baker-Henry Nature Preserve and Sparks Farm. In addition, the Raystown Field Station, located on Raystown Lake encompassing a complete watershed, consists of 365 acres for exclusive College use and a full 29,000 acres for additional research and study. The Field Station is leased from the Army Corps of Engineers and provides one of the most distinctive opportunities in environmental science in the nation.

Primarily residential (93% of degree seeking undergraduate students live in campus housing), Juniata maintains an enrollment of approximately 1,450 students. Sixty-three percent are from Pennsylvania. This year’s student body represents 32 states and territories, and 31 foreign countries.

 

 

Commendations

Juniata is mentioned in scores of diverse guides, articles, and measures of colleges and universities. Regardless of evaluation methods, the College is consistently praised as supportive, innovative, and a model for the best that liberal arts education can be.


Academic Principles

The success of students is directly linked to Juniata’s strong, dedicated faculty who consider teaching and advising their primary responsibilities.

The College supports a flexible, “value-centered” curriculum, wherein students may design their own Programs of Emphasis, which often transcend traditional majors. Programs of Emphasis may be tailored to personal goals and needs, may lead to either a B.A. or B.S. degree, and may include courses from among 19 academic departments. Each student consults with two faculty advisors and may also seek counsel from QUEST, Career Services staff and Counseling staff. Coursework takes place both on and off campus and includes such varied experiences as seminars, fieldwork, “on-the-job” internships, study abroad, independent study and research.


Juniata’s Approach to Student Development

As a community that focuses on the whole person, Juniata recognizes the importance of both curricular and co-curricular aspects of student development. Juniata has bridged the traditional higher education dichotomy between academic affairs and student affairs by merging these two branches of the College, a structural move that integrates the student’s college experience. Academic affairs and student services officers meet regularly to coordinate efforts to meet students’ educational and social development.


Accreditation

 

Juniata College is accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education (MSCHE), 3624 Market Street, 2nd Floor West, Philadelphia, PA 19104, 267-284-5000.  The Commission on Higher Education is recognized by the U.S. Secretary of Education to conduct accreditation and pre-accreditation activities for institutions of higher education in the region.  MSCHE is also recognized by the Council on Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) to accredit degree-granting institutions which offer one or more post-secondary educational programs of at least one academic year in length. 

The College is also certified by the American Chemical Society and the Council on Social Work Education. The Education Department is authorized by Pennsylvania’s Department of Education to offer teacher certification programs. The College is a member of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities, the Association of Independent Colleges and Universities of Pennsylvania, and the Council of Independent Colleges, as well as other state and national professional associations.

 

The Campus

Instructional Technology

Effectively using technology to strengthen the teaching-learning process is a high priority at Juniata. A Gigabit and fiber based network backbone provides connectivity in residence halls, classrooms, laboratories and offices. All students are automatically given accounts to access the network, print and e-mail servers, and the UNIX web servers. These accounts provide e-mail, Internet access, access to the Juniata on-line library catalogs, and web-based searches for all students and faculty. In addition, the college provides wireless access in all academic buildings and residence halls. Currently, several major public computing areas provide students access to Windows and Mac OSX, word processing, spreadsheet, presentation, statistics and database software in addition to e-mail and Internet access. All classrooms are fitted with computer projection equipment (or large screen LCD), laptop hook-ups, and sound systems. All students are required to have access to a laptop. The college portal, 'the Arch', provides students with quick and easy access to online college services such as grades, course registration, event scheduling, campus calendars and job listings.

A description of individual facilities follows:

Brumbaugh Academic Center - including Dale Hall

Geographic Information Systems Lab (B201) is a classroom/laboratory equipped with 18 Windows based machines and software focused on teaching and research using GIS tools. While this lab is primarily used for GIS, the equipment is available for general student use outside of normal class hours.

Networking and Telecommunications Lab (C102) - This room is primarily used as an Information Technology and Computer Science classroom, but is available to all disciplines for daytime academic activities. This classroom has 24 Windows-based workstations with flat panel monitors, including an instructor's podium and SmartBoard. The true benefit from this room stems from the fact that there is a complete, private, internal network that is separate from Juniata 's network (EagleNet). This network allows students to experiment with building their own servers, client workstations, and private subnetworks. There are dedicated machines, network equipment, simulated T1, and an internal wiring system to accommodate this private lab. This lab is not considered to be a public lab, but has been used to support Computer Science research projects, such as simulating a firewall and traffic-shaping design.

The Technology Solutions Center (C107) provides faculty, staff and students the latest hardware, software and training to maximize instructional and daily use of information technology. Juniata recognizes the importance of technology in today's society and brings that technology into the classroom and across campus through the Technology Solutions Center (TSC). The TSC supports most of the newest media production software as well as standard office applications. With digital video editing software, digital video cameras available for student and faculty use, and staff to support projects, the Technology Solutions Center is the hub of digital video production for classroom projects. The TSC is always investigating new technologies (hardware and software), making it a popular work study opportunity for students. The TSC has iMac workstations and 15 laptops for faculty, staff and student checkout.

In addition to the technology housed in the Technology Solutions Center, it is also home to much of the computer support and training on campus. The Help Desk provides support to campus employees and classroom technology. The TSC is responsible for the planning, deployment and maintenance of all classroom technology across campus. In addition, sound systems and other media for special events are maintained and coordinated through TSC.

Art and Theatre Studies Lab (P107) provides faculty, staff and students the latest hardware, software for theatre and arts production.  This lab houses 20 state of the art iMacs with a full compliment of software and high-end color printing. 

On Demand Education Resource and Collaboration Center (C229) is an area set aside for students specifically in the Innovations for Industry course sequence to gather in their respective teams to work on their client projects. Dedicated hardware, software and media presentation equipment is housed in this center specifically for the I4I course.

Physics Labs (P200 and P201) - Classrooms/laboratories equipped with 8 windows based machines and software focused on teaching and research in Physics. These labs are used almost exclusively by Physics students but are available to all students outside of scheduled class times.

Good Hall

Video Conference Room (G201) This room is equipped with LifeSize video conferencing equipment to facilitate distance education and online meetings.

Psychology Lab (G107) This classroom/laboratory houses 11 Windows based computers focused on teaching and research in Psychology. This room is dedicated to the Psychology students and faculty based on the nature of their research.

Beeghly Library

The library has a laptop checkout program that enables students to sign out one of 15 wireless laptops for use anywhere within the library. There are also numerous ports in the library for wired connection to the network.

Within the Reference Area are 30 computers used primarily by students and faculty for research using the library's online resources of over 100 databases and 10,000 periodicals, and access to over 200,000 e-books. The Library has six collaborative tables with large screens for group work with laptops, and two high speed printers.

The Writing Center/Library Instruction Room in the basement of Beeghly Library is a multi-purpose facility. During the day it serves as a classroom for teaching library research techniques and resources, in the evening it serves as a writing center for peer tutoring in writing skills. The room offers the capability for hands on teaching, especially of library technology skills, with MAC workstations, video presentation equipment, and several white boards. At the same time, in the evening it can provide a quiet and private place for students to go in order to receive personal help with their writing assignments. When the room is not in use for classes or tutoring, it is available as open computer lab space for the campus.

Ellis Hall

The Ellis Hall (1969 upgrades 2008) is noted for its imposing entrance columns, and honors Juniata’s sixth and seventh presidents, Charles C. and Calvert N. Ellis. A focal point of student life, Ellis houses the Career Services Office, Public Safety Office, Information Desk, Office of Conferences and Events, Office of Student Activities, the bookstore, post office, broadcasting center for WKVR radio, and offices for Student Government, Juniata Activities Board (JAB), The Juniatian, Laughing Bush, and other student organizations. In addition, the dining hall (the 680-seat Baker Refectory (renovated 2013), Eagles Landing (renovated 2008), a ballroom, student lounge areas, and conference rooms are here.

von Liebig Center for Science

Public Lab (vLCS 2073) -This classroom/laboratory is located in the von Liebig Center for Science. It contains 18 windows-based computers, SmartBoard, and a projector. This room is primarily used for science classes, but when not in use, it acts as a public lab for all students and faculty. This room is equipped with many science oriented programs, including ChemOffice, HyperChem, ISIS Draw, and many more.


Instructional Facilities

Carnegie Hall (1907; renovated in 1998), once the College library, is a center for the fine arts. Its Henry and Mabelle Shoemaker Gallery and Edwin and Susan (Rabinowitz) Malloy Gallery of Art, replete with original stained glass windows and skylight, are used for exhibits, lectures, and receptions. Carnegie Hall is home to the Worth B. Stottlemyer and Guenther Spaltmann art collections. The hall also includes studios, darkroom, and the Juniata College Museum of Art. The Sill Business Incubator (renovated 2013) was renovated to provide a spacious new home for the ceramics program.

For the musical arts, headquarters is Swigart Hall (1950), an attractive, white-brick building also on the northern side of the campus. Purchased for the College with a gift from W. Emmert Swigart ’06, it contains faculty offices, practice rooms, teaching studios, and classrooms, one of which is home to a Yamaha Piano Laboratory.

The William J. von Liebig Center for Science (2002), is a state of the art facility for biology and chemistry. The facility has strengthened Juniata’s position as a premier college for undergraduate teaching and learning in biology and chemistry. For research of all kinds, von Liebig is among the best equipped undergraduate science centers in the nation. Housed there are a cell culture facility, a shared facility for light (fluorescence, laser scanning confocal and DIC) and electron microscopy, and a fully equipped laboratory for molecular biology research. Other instrumentation includes an atomic force microscope, a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer, a nuclear magnetic resonance spectrophotometer, a liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometer, and an x-ray diffractometer.

In the Brumbaugh Academic Center (1968) , three separate wings house seven departments. The Dale Hall wing houses business/accounting/economics, communication, information technology and computer science, and mathematics; with physics, earth and environmental science, geology, and the College Academic Computer Center located in the two corresponding wings. The circular hub of BAC includes Alumni Hall, a 400-seat auditorium, and one smaller lecture hall.

In addition, the 365-acre Raystown Field Station and the Davis and Robinson residence lodges on nearby Raystown Lake provides one of the country’s most distinctive opportunities in environmental studies. The Raystown Field Station, encompassing a complete watershed, consists of 365 acres for exclusive College use and a full 29,000 acres for additional research and study.

The center for the social sciences, Good Hall (1967, renovated 2008) contains more than 30 classrooms, two computer facilities, and three instructional laboratories: psychology, modern languages, and human interaction. A second facility, the Early Childhood Education Center, is located in Maude-Lesher Hall.

The world languages are currently headquartered in the former Humanities Center (1979) now called World Languages Center (2011), Carnegie Hall (1907, renovated 1998) and Founders Hall (1878, restored 2009). The buildings house faculty offices, seminar rooms, classrooms, and art galleries while the surrounding lawn and campus areas accommodate outdoor classes and art displays.


General Facilities

Founders Hall is the oldest building on campus. Constructed in 1879 (restored 2009) on land donated by local citizens, houses most administrative offices, including the President’s Office, Provost’s Office, Dean of Students, QUEST, the Registrar's Office, College Advancement Offices and the departments of English and History.

The William E. Swigart, Jr. Enrollment Center (1975 remodeled in 1996) is located on 18th Street between Good Hall and the Brumbaugh Academic Center. It should be the first stop on any campus visit. The College Public Relations Office is located in the Pennington House, adjacent to Brumbaugh Academic Center. The Alumni Relations Office is located in the Harold B. Brumbaugh Alumni House on Mifflin Street behind Good Hall. Accounting Services, Digital Communications and Administrative Information Services are housed in The Stone House on Moore St. Business Services and Human Resources are located at 1923 Moore St.

The Oller Center for Peace and International Programs (1999) houses the offices of International Programs and Peace and Conflict Studies. The International Programs Office (IPO) coordinates Juniata’s internationalization efforts. The office staff members support the College’s international student population, maintain an active study abroad program, assist faculty in curricular and programmatic planning, and enhance the international environment of the College.

The Ellis Hall (1969 upgrades 2008) is noted for its imposing entrance columns, and honors Juniata’s sixth and seventh presidents, Charles C. and Calvert N. Ellis. A focal point of student life, Ellis houses the Career Services Office, Public Safety Office, Information Desk, Office of Conferences and Events, Office of Student Activities, the bookstore, post office, broadcasting center for WKVR radio, and offices for Student Government, Juniata Activities Board (JAB), The Juniatian, Laughing Bush, and other student organizations. In addition, the dining hall, the 680-seat Baker Refectory (renovated 2005), Eagles Landing (renovated 2008), a ballroom, student lounge areas, and conference rooms are here.

Juniata’s L.A. Beeghly Library (1963) provides the Juniata community with a web-based online public access catalog and library system, many full-text and other electronic databases, a book collection built to support undergraduate research, an extraordinary Special Collection, the College's Archives, and a staff eager to assist patrons and to collaborate. The library's online resources are accessible throughout the campus and beyond, and by study abroad students, making the library's web page a very convenient source for academic research. Laptops are available for patron checkout at the circulation desk and the basement contains an instruction room with 15 desktops.

The first floor has many desktop computers, two high speed printers, and an Information Commons built to support comfort, technology and collaboration. The library contains some 208,000 bound volumes, microforms, government documents, audio-visual resource materials, and can offer access to over 15,000 periodicals (full-text online, microfilm and print),200,000 e-books, as well as access to literally over a billion electronic documents, and several prominent rare book and document collections. The Library also has six collaborative areas with large screens and white boards for group study with laptops. Beeghly Library has the sixth ranked German-American rare book collection in the country. Study space can be found for over 400 patrons, including several interactive study rooms, and many network ports for laptops, including a wireless system. Almost all books and periodicals, except some rare editions in the W. Emmert Swigart Treasure Room, are accessible on an “open-stack” basis. The library offers interlibrary loan service, reserves, and classroom instruction, and welcomes suggestions for additions to the library collection. The library also houses the Writing Center and a Curriculum Library. The Friends of the Library is an active group which provide valuable support and is a very active group on behalf of the Beeghly Library. Many librarians teach College Writing Seminar Courses, as well as in the large library instruction program. 

For cultural events, the Halbritter Center for the Performing Arts (2006)includes both the Rosenberger Auditorium and the Suzanne von Liebig Theatre. The Rosenberger Auditorium (built in 1940 remodeled in 2006)seats 850 and is used by most visiting speakers and performers as well as for student and faculty productions. The auditorium's acoustics are rated highly and large proscenium stage is equipped with modern lighting and sound equipment. The Suzanne von Liebig Theatre (2006)is a 200 seat, free form state of the art flexible theatre. The Center also includes a dance/movement theatre studio, costume shop, scene shop, classroom, green room, dressing rooms, and gallery space in its lobby.


The Kennedy Sports+Recreation Center (1983) provides Juniata students with modern recreational facilities. A hub for out-of-classroom activity, the Kennedy Center contains two gymnasiums; a six-lane, 25-meter swimming pool; and the F. Samuel Brumbaugh and Martha A. Brumbaugh Strength and Fitness Center (1998); racquetball/handball courts; and three expanded locker rooms. Dedicated to those from the College who served in World War I and II, the Memorial Gym (1951) serves as the center for varsity sports activity with a seating capacity of 1,200 for basketball and volleyball.

Outdoor facilities include the Raffensperger Tennis Courts, several intramural and practice fields, Langdon/Goodale Field (baseball), the new Juniata/Huntingdon softball field, Goodman Field (2012) at Knox Stadium (football and field hockey), the Jefford F. Oller Track (2009) and the Winton Hill soccer fields.


Residence Halls

With Juniata’s residence halls and apartment facilities, the College can accommodate more than 1,200 students. Most on-campus residence halls have been completely renovated and all now include computer and cable hookups in each rooms. Residence halls also have lounges, and free laundry facilities. 

Among the residence halls is The Cloister (1928; renovated in 1994) located at the center of campus. An outstanding example of Pennsylvania German architecture, it vividly recalls the heritage of the College. At the other end of the architectural spectrum are the East Houses (1970; renovated in 1999), a complex of four modern sections providing apartment-style living. 

Tussey-Terrace (1966; renovated in 1997), Sunderland Hall (1955; renovated in 1992), and Sherwood Hall (1961; renovated in 1992) form part of the northern boundary of the campus. Maude-Lesher Hall (1957; renovated in 2005) is just across the street from the Ellis Hall, while South Hall (1962; renovated in 1995)overlooks College Field. Nathan Hall (2014) is the newest residence hall, located at the north end of campus next to the Winton Hill Soccer Fields. The residence hall features 77 single rooms, including suites with living rooms, as well as private and semi-private bathrooms.

 College apartment buildings within convenient walking distance include the Mission House at 18th and Washington Streets, the “Pink Palace” on Moore Street, and Hess Apartments on 14th and Washington Streets. Five additional houses were added in 2004 and 2005, some of which house the Global Village, a globally themed living and learning community.


The Raystown Field Station

The Raystown Field Station is a 365-acre reserve operated as a center for environmental research and education. Located only 20 miles south of campus, the Station provides students with access to 29,000 acres of Army Corps of Engineers property, including the 8,300-acre Raystown Lake, the largest lake in Pennsylvania. The Station has modern facilities and accommodations including Shuster Hall (2003) that features state-of-the-art green architecture. Sustainable design was a central factor in the construction of the lakefront Shuster Hall. Two lakeside lodges (2006) adjacent to Shuster Hall provide modern housing complete with internet access. The Station also provides rustic accommodations at Grove Farm, a remodeled 18th century log farmhouse. Two semester-long immersion programs are currently offered, The Environmental Field Semester in the fall, and Ecology and Organismal Biology in the spring. The Station also offers an abbreviated June semester with courses focused on wildlife biology and conservation.

Students participating in the immersion semesters take all of their courses at the Field Station and live in the lodges on the lakeshore. The Environmental Field semester provides an immersion experience into the Northern Appalachians. Course topics include ecology, geographic information systems (GIS), water resources or forestry (alternating years), field research, and the integrating seminar, A Sense of Place. Field work is integrated with course work and local projects as key educational approaches to this unique experience. Students in environmental science and studies, environmental education, geology and other natural sciences will find this semester to be central to their learning experience. Ecology and Organismal Biology is a joint venture with St Francis University, including courses in zoology or wildlife management (alternating years), plant or fish ecology (alternating years), animal behavior or marine biology (alternating years) and geographic information systems (GIS).

Other features of the Station include full internet connectivity, a series of ground water monitoring wells, a private harbor, a boat dock with a fleet of boats including a Boston Whaler, a 26' pontoon float boat and a 36' houseboat designed for aquatic laboratory work. The station also offers canoes and kayaks for student recreation. Two 4wd vehicles and a variety of field sampling gear, including microscopes, telemetry units, data loggers, laptop computers and portable water analysis labs, equip students and faculty for a wide range of field research activities. The Station hosts course activities for several academic departments, sponsors numerous faculty and student research projects and internships, provides community environmental education opportunities and is the home to the annual Juniata maple syrup program.


Baker-Henry Nature Preserve and Elizabeth Evans Baker Peace Chapel

In addition to the main campus and other buildings, Juniata owns the 316-acre Baker-Henry Nature Preserve on which is located the Elizabeth Evans Baker Peace Chapel. Architect and artist Maya Lin, who also designed the Vietnam Veterans’ Memorial in Washington, D.C., and the Civil Rights Memorial in Montgomery, Alabama, designed the Baker Peace Chapel. The Chapel is a place for both private meditation and public celebration. A grassy path ties two hilltops together: on one, a single, polished granite circle set in a bed of moss; on the other, a forty-foot circle of rough-cut English granite.


The Juniata College Center for Entrepreneurial Leadership (JCEL)

The Juniata College Center for Entrepreneurial Leadership (JCEL) was developed to integrate entrepreneurial principles and actions into all academic disciplines; touching students and faculty alike. It promotes the “creation of value” in an economic or social sense. JCEL provides experiential learning opportunities to students by providing the tools and resources to act on their product or service idea and create businesses.  

These tools and resources include technical assistance, mentoring, seed capital and space.  Technical assistance & mentoring is provided by faculty, staff and volunteer mentors helping students move through the business planning process to ensure their plan has a reasonable chance to succeed.  JCEL has a Student Seed Capital Fund able to loan or invest up to $ 15,000 in a student business.  

The space we provide is located in the Bob & Eileen Sill Business Incubator (SBI).  SBI has 10,000 square feet of wet lab, professional office and light assembly space for undergraduate entrepreneurs, faculty members and community members. Our Next Step Fellowship Program can provide monetary support to a student who has a business idea they would like to develop. We can pay a student $ 7.25 per hour, in a work study fashion, to research & expound upon their idea. The goal of which is for the student to have developed a full business plan and present it to the JCEL Board for financial support.  

JCEL also offers internships to students from many disciplines/POEs including (but not limited to) entrepreneurship, finance, marketing, management, communications and information technology. Many students have benefited from our large network of contacts and real world tasks & interactions.

 In essence, JCEL offers many tools & resources to help students become successful here at Juniata.  Full program details can be found at https://www.juniata.edu/offices/jcel/


Academic Programs

Curriculum

Educated persons are prepared for lifelong learning, for continually dealing with changing perceptions and new bodies of knowledge. Beyond facts that become outdated, they ask intelligent questions, make informed decisions, and think confidently for themselves.

Educated persons are capable of regulating their own lives, not only with regard to decisions made in vocational contexts but within the larger contexts of their lives as citizens and social beings. An institution in the liberal arts tradition must take as its goal not only provision of the best possible career training, but also provision of the skills and knowledge graduates need to make contributions to the total community. At Juniata, we believe the procedures of acquiring an education are an important part of the educational process. Therefore, certain educational decisions are made by each student using the information provided by faculty advisors and the intellectual skills developed during the first few semesters at the College.

Educated persons should be able to think independently about intellectual and moral issues. Juniata's program is designed, therefore, to promote and develop the habits of mind and communications skills needed to make and implement decisions. Students wrestle with profound issues of human values, not only as dealt with in the past, but as they affect current thinking in a student's chosen field.

Students entering Juniata in fall 2019 or after follow the Juniata College Curriculum. Students work with two faculty advisors to shape their Program of Emphasis but will do so within the context of experiences designed to connect ideas, develop skills to engage with people and issues, and learn to discern meaning, relevance, and value. Our curriculum strengthens every student’s ability to solve problems, empathize with others, act with grace in the face of complexity, and understand that to get better answers, one must ask better questions.

Core Requirements

Information Access

Information Access is a one credit course required of all entering students, first years and transfers that ensures competency in the use of computing, network and library technologies at Juniata College.  There are no exemptions from the course.


College Writing Seminar

In CWS, students will develop their reading, writing, and analytical skills. CWS will introduce students to the diverse modes of thought and communication that characterize the college experience. Individual conferences, peer reading, revision of writing and portfolio assessment are some of the essential elements in this process-oriented approach to college work. Note: This course does not satisfy a distribution requirement.


Liberal Arts Distribution

The intent of the distribution requirement is to assist students in broadening their education. This breadth helps students to develop and retain the intellectual flexibility necessary to cope with their rapidly changing environment. 

Students must complete at least six credit hours of coursework in each of the following five areas. In three of these five areas, at least one course must have a prerequisite or be at the 300-level. Courses may be used for only one area.

Fine Arts (F):

Fine arts courses examine the interaction of elements within art forms, the ways in which these interactions produce artistic expression, and the conventions of the particular artistic disciplines.  In these courses, students expand their expressive abilities and/or sharpen their skills at formal analysis (such as how to experience a work of art). 

International Studies (I):

International courses may study global issues in one of three ways:  1. The course introduces students to the history, art, literature, philosophy, or civic life of people of different nationalities.  2. The course requires students to think and express themselves in a language other than English. 3. The course examines international social, material, cultural, or intellectual exchange at a systemic level. Each semester spent abroad can be used to fulfill three credits of I distribution.

Social Science (S):

Social scientists strive to understand a wide range of human behavior, from the formation of the self to the interaction of nations. Knowledge is acquired from systematic study using a diverse set of scientific methods including laboratory experiments, field observation, survey analyses, and quantitative and qualitative ethnographic analyses, and insight acquired through experience.

Humanities (H):

The humanities use methods such as textual interpretation, historical analysis, and philosophical investigation to ask fundamental questions of value, purpose, and meaning in a rigorous and systematic way.  The humanities teach us to think critically and imaginatively, informed by the knowledge of how those questions are (or have been) understood in different times, places, and cultures.

Natural Sciences (N):

Courses in natural and mathematical sciences enable students to engage with the methods of exploring the processes of the natural world. These methods include observation, generation of models and hypotheses, and analysis of models that pertain to the natural world, and empirical testing.


General Education Curriculum

All Juniata Students will complete two General Education courses. One course will be chosen from the Interdisciplinary Colloquia offerings and one will be from the Cultural Analysis offerings.

Interdisciplinary Colloquia (IC)

Juniata has a strong tradition of requiring students to have a team-taught and interdisciplinary experience. These courses emphasize reading, discussion, and writing in an interdisciplinary setting. Topics vary, but all IC courses, regardless of their content, will include serious consideration of the relationships between theory and practice in different disciplines and of how the insights provided by an interdisciplinary approach can have a positive effect on individuals' personal and public lives.

IC waiver: Students who take part in the Remote Field Station Program while living at the field station for the semester, will receive a waiver at the end of the semester once grades have been posted to have the program evaluations (degree audits) reflect the experience.

Cultural Analysis (CA)

CA courses deal with human culture in the variety of its philosophic, literary, artistic, economic, social, political, scientific, and other forms. Each course focuses on how relationships between ideas and institutions have shaped societies, and the thoughts and behaviors of individuals and groups. Approaches include: historical approaches that examine the development of a given culture over time; approaches that examine encounters or conflicts between two cultures or societies; or approaches that examine the variety of interactions among individuals and sub-groups within a given culture or society.

Students can also complete the CA requirement by completing co-requisite courses that together meet the CA requirements and add to at least three credits. Such projects normally include either a synthetic paper of ten or more pages, or student generated presentations or productions (for example, original art, music or drama) accompanied by a shorter written commentary. A CA course with other liberal art distributions will only count once, either for a CA or the distribution, if one is so designated. The prerequisite for CA courses is EN-109 or EN-110.

Writing Requirement for IC and CA

Cultural Analysis courses will build on the skills of insightful reading, analysis, and writing acquired in the first year of study. Courses will provide a basic familiarity with some concepts and methods of cultural analysis. They may be offered as either 3- or 4- credit courses. In CA courses, students will make use of both primary (textual or other artifacts) and secondary sources. (Secondary works are those which interpret primary sources, or develop a method for the study of primary sources.) These primary and secondary works will provide the raw materials for a synthetic project. Such projects will normally include either a synthetic paper of ten or more pages, or student-generated presentations or productions (for example, original art, music or drama) accompanied by a shorter written commentary. Any project must be designed to demonstrate the student’s capacity for independent research and critical thinking. Students will be expected to show an awareness of their own presuppositions and of the possibilities and limitations of their methods. Faculty members proposing courses must include in their course proposal an explanation of how course assignments will demonstrate the student’s capacity for analysis and synthesis with an appropriate degree of rigor.

IC and CA waivers:

The Interdisciplinary Colloquia (IC) and Cultural Analysis (CA) will be waived for students who has successfully completed a world language course beyond the 210 level in the target language and a semester of study abroad in the target language and culture. These waivers will be provided by the World Language department after the study abroad transcript has been received and confirmed.


Communications Component

In addition to the College Writing Seminar, students will take at least four "C" courses (minimum 12 credits), two courses or 6 credits must be writing-based (CW) and the additional courses may be speech-based (CS). One CW course must be in the POE.

A CW course devotes considerable time to the development and assessment of writing skills. CW courses require multiple writing assignments that total fifteen to twenty-five pages during the semester, though these totals may vary by discipline. The methods of teaching writing often vary by discipline and by instructor, but all CW courses explicitly address the mechanics of writing and editing. Consequently, the syllabus of a CW course indicates the specific writing goals of the class, the criteria by which writing assignments will be evaluated, and the writing or style manual(s) that serve as the basis of instruction. A significant portion of class time is specifically dedicated to learning writing skills. At least 35% of the final course grade will be determined by writing assignments.

CW courses are intended to help students develop, compose, organize, revise, and edit their own writing. They develop a student's abilities to identify and define a thesis as well as to collect, organize, present, and analyze evidence and documentation to disseminate knowledge. CW courses are not limited to English only.

A speech-based (CS) course requires at least 25% of the grade be determined by two or more oral individual or group presentations, and it fulfills two requirements: (1) The course aims to develop rhetorical skills necessary for effective and creative speech in individual, group or public presentation. This may include one or more of the following: speech design and delivery, listening, negotiation, leadership, persuasion, collaboration, or decision making; (2) The course offers students at least two opportunities to demonstrate these skills. Evaluation of the first opportunity guides improvement of the second.


Quantitative Component

There are two parts to the Quantitative Skills component: a statistical part (QS), and a mathematical part (QM). Courses that satisfy the statistics requirement will carry a QS designation and should contain elementary statistics topics such as averages, standard deviation and other measures of dispersion, as well as interpretation of data, tables, graphs, and some probability. Courses that satisfy the mathematical requirement will carry a QM designation and must use a combination of algebraic, graphical, and numerical reasoning. Such courses should teach students how to translate problems into mathematical language, how to solve the mathematical problems, and how to interpret the solutions. Courses that carry a Q designation must fulfill the requirements for both the statistical (QS) and mathematical (QM) components. 

Courses with quantitative skills components necessarily involve the use of appropriate technology. 

Students have two options for fulfilling the Quantitative Skills component. They may either 1) complete a single course that carries the Q designation or 2) complete a course that fulfills a QS designation and complete a course that carries a QM designation.

 


Program of Emphasis (POE)

More than 23 percent of Juniata graduates elect to develop an individualized POE. Students are encouraged to select the POE format that best serves their needs.

The Program of Emphasis (POE) is Juniata's unique approach to focused education in an academic area of a student's choosing. Somewhat similar to a traditional "major," the POE consists of up to half of the total degree and is an opportunity for students to explore in depth a particular discipline or to craft an interdisciplinary plan to study an area. With advisors' help, students draft a POE goal statement, identify classes, and develop rationale for their program.   They are:

Designated - A POE of 45-63 credits. Designated POEs have been proposed by a department or program and approved by the Curriculum committee. No student rationale is required.

Individualized - A POE of 45-63 credits designed by the student in consultation with faculty advisors. Individualized POEs are intended to meet particular student needs with unique combinations of courses. Approval requires students to write a rationale that describes how the courses they have listed help them reach the academic goals of the POE.

Secondary Emphases will not be a part of the POE; they will have a separate status, separate paperwork, and will be recorded separately on the student's transcript.  For each department, a secondary emphasis description can be found on the department's website.  The general guideline is: 18 credits with at least 6 of them are upper level.


Designated POEs

ACCOUNTING, BUSINESS, AND ECONOMICS

ART AND ART HISTORY

BIOLOGY

CHEMISTRY

COMMUNICATION AND THEATRE ARTS

EDUCATION

ENGLISH

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND STUDIES

GEOLOGY

HISTORY AND ANTHROPOLOGY

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND COMPUTER SCIENCE

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

MATHEMATICS

PEACE AND CONFLICT STUDIES

PHILOSOPHY

PHYSICS

POLITICS

PSYCHOLOGY

RELIGIOUS STUDIES

SOCIOLOGY AND SOCIAL WORK

WORLD LANGUAGES & CULTURES


Individual POEs

Following is a list of some recent student initiated individual POEs.


Distinction in the Program of Emphasis

To achieve distinction in the Program of Emphasis, a student must fulfill all graduation requirements and a senior experience that integrates several areas of their POE.  This requirement can be fulfilled in many ways.  Some possibilities might include: an original independent creative project that involves significant academic work, such as laboratory research resulting in a significant report; a major paper on a well-defined project; a body of artistic work equivalent to a major exhibition or performance; or field experience (e.g. student teaching or certain internships) culminating in a significant report. The project must be evaluated and judged worthy of distinction in the POE by two faculty members, at least one of whom must be from the home department. The project must also be presented in a forum open to all interested parties, either at Juniata or to an outside audience such as the National Conference on Undergraduate Research (NCUR).

Departments and programs will be free to establish further requirements for receiving distinction in the POE, including higher GPA requirements.

Departments shall forward the names of successful candidates for distinction to the Registrar's Office.

 

 

Pre-Professional Programs

Health Professions

Health Professions Link for different programs

Health Professions Advisors:  Professors Peter Baran, Kathy Baughman, Randy Bennett, James Borgardt, Dan Dries, Kathy Jones, Jill Keeney, Elizabeth Mansberger, Susan Radis, David Widman, and Ursula Williams.

We offer advising for entry into professional and graduate school training in such fields as Art Therapy, Audiology, Biotechnology, Chiropractic, Cytotechnology, Dentistry, Genetic Counseling, Health Administration, Health Communication, Social Work with a Focus in Medicine/Behavioral health, Medical Technology, Medicine, Naturopathic Medicine, Nursing, Occupational Therapy, Optometry, Pharmacy, Physical Therapy, Physician Assistant, Podiatric Medicine, Public Health, Radiologic Sciences, and Veterinary Medicine. Students interested in a career in the health professions must meet the specific requirements for admission to a professional school. Since these vary from school to school, the students consult with a member of the Health Professions Committee as they prepare their courses so that students not only have an excellent chance of acceptance into professional schools, but also receive a breadth of knowledge that provides a firm foundation for their liberal arts education.

Students gain in-depth exposure to the health sciences through various types of opportunities that include internships at various health care facilities and universities, shadowing of local health professionals, health-related course work, participation in the Primary Care Scholars Program offered by the Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine at Hershey, and/or various research opportunities on and off campus.

Juniata offers exceptional preparation for students interested in rural medicine through opportunities for shadowing at J.C. Blair Memorial Hospital in Huntingdon, a summer internship at Altoona Regional Health System and winter break programs at Altoona Regional and Geisinger Health Systems. To assist students for professional school applications we offer a Health Careers Seminar that provides an overview of the entire application process and an on-campus, faculty led Admission Exam Prep Course.

In addition, as a result of a bequest by a Juniata alumnus and physician, there is a four year Lawrence Johnson Scholarship at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry for Juniata premedical students.


Pre-Law

Advisor: Professor Barlow

The pre-legal student should seek a broad undergraduate experience in the liberal arts. Students interested in law should have a thorough command of English, an extensive background in research methods, skill and experience in developing logical arguments, and a critical understanding of the human institutions and values with which the law deals. They are strongly encouraged to develop proficiency in another language and to study abroad. Juniata also offers courses in conflict resolution, a growing field in the legal profession. Although students may develop any Program of Emphasis which suits their particular talents and interests, the experience of others indicates that English, history, politics, American studies, and economics are the most common programs of students entering law schools.

In addition to helping students through the process of applying to law school, the pre-law advisor assists with course selections that will fulfill their POE goals while providing them with appropriate skills for the study of law.  In addition, he helps to provide students with resources to prepare for the LSAT and helps to arrange internships that allow students to explore the legal field while they are in college.  Students should plan to take the LSAT in the fall of the senior year and apply to law school by mid-January.

A special arrangement with the Duquesne University School of Law allows students to apply for admission to the Law School after three years of undergraduate study, allowing them to complete their degrees in six rather than seven years.  Students must have a LSAT score that puts them at or above the 75th percentile, and a GPA of 3.36 or better.


Social Work

Advisors: Professor Radis

The Dorothy Baker Johnson and Raymond R. Day Social Work Program, accredited by the Council on Social Work Education since 1982, is designed primarily to prepare students for beginning professional practice in the field following successful completion of the undergraduate requirements. An important secondary objective of the program is preparation for graduate education in social work and related areas of study.

Students who seek professional competence in assisting individuals, families, groups, and communities in solving human problems develop Programs of Emphasis which reflect an interdisciplinary approach to undergraduate study. A foundation of courses from the natural and social sciences is combined with specific courses in social work practice and social welfare policy. Such a program also allows the student to focus on a particular area of inquiry (e.g., health care, criminal justice, families and children, developmental disabilities, etc.) that may complement the social work interest.

Of great importance to the social work student is Juniata's Social Work Professional Semester. In cooperation with social service agencies representing many areas of social work (e.g., medical, criminal justice, drug and alcohol, developmental disabilities, aging, family and children, etc.), the internship is organized to provide senior students with an educational opportunity to integrate and apply the skills, knowledge, and values mastered in the classroom with the daily tasks of the social worker in the field.


Teaching

Advisors: Professors Biddle, DeHaas, Glosenger, Jones; Coordinator of Field Experience-Staff

Since 1876 Juniata College prepared individuals for careers in teaching, human development, and childcare. Currently, the Education Department is authorized by Pennsylvania’s Department of Education to offer teacher certification programs in PreK-4th grade, Unified PreK-4th grade and Special Education PreK-8th grade; and 12 areas of secondary education; including Biology, Chemistry, English, Earth & Space Science, Environmental Education, Social Studies, Math, Physics, General Science, French, German and Spanish. In addition, the Education Department works closely with the Office of International Education to promote study abroad.

Although the Education Department’s primary focus is on teacher preparation, department members also provide guidance and serve as advisors for individuals who create their own Programs of Emphasis.  Other students do a secondary emphasis in education and combine studies in education with programs in social work, health professions, psychology, human development and child life.

Students who seek teacher certification must meet all of the certification requirements mandated by the Pennsylvania Department of Education and Juniata College's Education Department. All certification requirements for admission to, retention in, and completion of a certification program are outlined in the Education Department Student Handbook.

Cooperative Programs

Health Professions Affiliations

 

A distinctive feature of the Juniata College Health Professions Program is a broad array of formal affiliation agreements. These agreements enable qualified students to gain early acceptance or accelerated admission into professional school programs.


Several types of programs are included, designated below by the number of years a student spends at Juniata College, followed by the number of years spent at the affiliated institution. The 3 + _ programs allow students who matriculate at Juniata for three years and complete all the Juniata College general degree requirements, to earn degrees from both Juniata College and the corresponding professional institution.

The "_" designation indicates a variable number of years at the professional school, depending on the specialty chosen.

See the specific career track on the Health Professions website for details.

https://www.juniata.edu/academics/departments/healthprofessions/

Biotechnology

3 + 1 B.S. program with Jefferson School of Health Professions
3 + 2 B.S./M.S. entry-level master's program with Jefferson School of Health Professions

Chiropractic

3 + 3 B.S./D.C. program with the New York Chiropractic College

Cytotechnology

3 + 1 B.S. program with Jefferson School of Health Professions
3 + 2 B.S./M.S. Entry-level Master's Program with Jefferson School of Health Professions

Dentistry

3 + 4 B.S./D.M.D. program with Temple University School of Dentistry
4 + 4 B.S./D.M.D. Early Acceptance Program with the LECOM School of Dental Medicine

Medical Technology


3 + 1 program with Jefferson School of Health Professions
3+2 B.S./M.S. Entry-level Master’s program with Jefferson School of Health Professions

Medicine

4 + 4 B.S./D.O. Early Assurance Program with Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine
4 + 4 B.S./M.D. Early Assurance Program with Temple University School of Medicine and Geisinger Health System

Nursing

3 + __ B.S./M.N./M.S.N./D.N.P. (Doctor of Nursing Practice) OR D.N.P/Ph.D. programs with the Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing at Case Western Reserve University

Occupational Therapy

3 + 2 B.S./M.S.O.T. program with Jefferson School of Health Professions

Optometry

3 + 4 B.S./O.D. program with the Pennsylvania College of Optometry at Salus University

Pharmacy

3 + 3 and 3 + 4 Accelerated OR 4 + 3 and 4 + 4 Early Acceptance B.S./Pharm.D. programs with Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine School of Pharmacy

Physical Therapy

4 + 3 B.S./D.P.T. Early Acceptance program with Drexel University
3 + 3 B.S./D.P.T. program with Jefferson School of Health Professions

4 + 3 B.S./D.P.T. Early Acceptance program with Widener University

Podiatric Medicine

4 + 4 B.S./D.P.M. Early Assurance program with Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine

Radiologic Sciences

4 +1 B.S. and M.S. options in a variety of specialties with Jefferson School of Health Professions

Other Affiliations

Engineering: 3+2 Programs

Advisor: Professor White

Juniata participates with Columbia University, The Pennsylvania State University, and Washington University in St. Louis,  in cooperative programs for training in engineering. The purpose of such arrangements is to produce engineers who are educated in the fullest sense, as well as competent specialists in a particular field.

The student takes three years of undergraduate work at Juniata. Upon recommendations of the adviser and fulfillment of the transfer requirements, including the required GPA, he or she then transfers to the engineering institution for two additional years of engineering study. Upon successful completion of the five years, the student receives two degrees; a bachelor's of science degree from Juniata and an engineering degree from Columbia University, The Pennsylvania State University, or Washington University in St Louis.


Law: 3+3 Program

Advisor: Professor Barlow

The pre-legal student should seek a broad undergraduate experience in the liberal arts. Students interested in law should have a thorough command of English, an extensive background in research methods, skill and experience in developing logical arguments, and a critical understanding of the human institutions and values with which the law deals. They are strongly encouraged to develop proficiency in another language and to study abroad. Juniata also offers courses in conflict resolution, a growing field in the legal profession. Although students may develop any Program of Emphasis which suits their particular talents and interests, the experience of others indicates that English, history, politics, American studies, and economics are the most common programs of students entering law schools.

In addition to helping students through the process of applying to law school, the prelaw adviser assists with course selections that will fulfill their POE goals while providing them with appropriate skills for the study of law. In addition, he helps to provide students with resources to prepare for the LSAT and helps to arrange internships that allow students to explore the legal field while they are in college. Students should plan to take the LSAT in the fall of the senior year and apply to law school by mid-January.

A special arrangement with the Duquesne University School of Law allows students to apply for admission to the Law School after three years of undergraduate study, allowing them to complete their degrees in six rather than seven years. Students must have an LSAT score that puts them at or above the 75th percentile, and a GPA of 3.36 or better.

Masters Programs:

Purdue for Masters in Chemistry

http://www.juniata.edu/departments/chemistry/outcomes.html

To qualify for automatic acceptance the student must have a 3.3 GPA and has a letter of recommendation from the chair of the chemistry department. Purdue has a graduate program in chemistry and analytical chemistry.









International Education

Center of International Education

"As a member of the international community, Juniata College extends each student's academic experience into the wider world, supporting the free exchange of thought among peoples from distinct cultures and languages." - Mission Statement

Kati Csoman, Dean, Center of International Programs

Since the inception of its faculty-generated exchange programs in 1962, Juniata has championed internationalism by welcoming students from partner institutions, enabling financial aid and scholarships to apply to overseas study, encouraging faculty to recommend international experiences for their qualified students, and allowing courses taken overseas to be incorporated into any academic curriculum. Juniata promotes international competencies through study abroad for students in every Program of Emphasis. Programs of Emphasis with strong international components may be found throughout this catalog, particularly under International Studies, World Languages and Cultures, History, Political Science, and Accounting/Business/Economics.  Juniata cultivates proficiency in a second language, offers an English for Academic Purposes (EAP) for international students, hosts exchange students from twelve partner institutions, and boasts degree-seeking international students and alumni from all over the globe.

The Center for International Education (CIE) is at the core of developing and nurturing Juniata's partnerships with secondary schools and universities abroad, and with infusing internationalism into campus life.  The College’s vibrant exchange programs facilitate international engagement by offering a framework for Juniata students abroad, and increasing the variety and number of international students on campus.  Our programs also provide faculty members with opportunities to conduct visits and arrange overseas teaching opportunities, and enable faculty members from international partner institutions to speak with classes, hold public lectures, share in joint research projects, and participate in informal interaction with students.  An active "International Education Committee" and the “American Council on Education’s Internationalization Leadership Team” (composed of faculty, administrators and students) advise the CIE, help to coordinate international activities at Juniata, and provide direction for future growth.  The CIE maintains membership in several national and international organizations, including the National Association of International Educators (NAFSA); The Forum on Education Abroad; Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL), the Institute for International Education (IIE); the Association of International Education Administrators (AIEA); the American Council on Education (ACE); and the Pennsylvania Council for International Education (PaCIE).


International Students

International Students

Kati Csoman, Dean, Center for International Education

Juniata welcomes students from around the world.  The staff of the Center for International Education (CIE) provides support to students from around the world with visa issues, pre-arrival planning, orientation, academic advising, and adjustment to studying and living in the U.S. The CIE promotes academic and social programs incorporating language, international and intercultural subjects, and works closely with faculty members and departments to support the academic performance of international students.   Requirements for admission and scholarship and financial aid information for international students can be found in the Admission section of this catalog.


Intercultural Activities

Juniata supports a number of student organizations and co-curricular activities that facilitate intercultural learning. Students may choose to live in the Global Village, which brings together diverse students with interests in world languages and intercultural exploration into common residences for intentional living and learning communities.  The French, German, and Spanish Clubs sponsor cultural events and join faculty in hosting language tables in the Global Commons. . Other clubs like the Chinese Club, and Russian Club have grown out of student interest in world cultures and are instrumental in the success of such activities as the Chinese New Year dinner, film series, lectures, and other intercultural learning activities on the campus.  The Juniata Chapter of "Sigma Iota Rho", a national honor society "to promote and reward scholarship and service among students and practitioners of international studies and global relations and to foster integrity and creative performance in the conduct of global affairs," honors successful students in International Studies


Study Abroad

Juniata encourages study abroad as an integral component of a liberal arts education. A variety of study abroad programs is available, including offerings for the full academic year, one semester, and short-term programs, many of which are led by Juniata professors. While year-long language immersion programs in which a student continues to study in the Program of Emphasis are the optimal, study abroad experiences offered at Juniata provide students opportunities for personal and academic growth.

Juniata students can study abroad on every continent (except Antarctica), in the following countries: Africa (the Gambia, Morocco, Rwanda), Asia (China, India, Japan, Taiwan), Europe (Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Russia, Spain, United Kingdom), North America (Canada, Mexico), Oceania (Australia, New Zealand), and South America (Ecuador). Juniata supports Direct Enroll/ Exchange (EXC), and Brethren Colleges Abroad (BCA) programs; some of these are Limited Enrollment (LE).  A complete list of programs and their requirements can be found at: https://www.juniata.edu/academics/departments/international/study-abroad/programs/index.php.

Students with Programs of Emphasis from all academic departments are eligible for approved study abroad programs, following the guidance of their faculty advisers to maintain academic progress. In Juniata approved programs, credits and grades will be indicated on the Juniata transcript. In all approved programs (except summer), Juniata financial aid is applicable, including grants-in-aid and scholarships. Students pay the regular Juniata tuition and fees for the semester and year programs and all financial aid and scholarships apply (tuition benefit involves special tuition arrangements; students can obtain information from the Center for International Education. PAR rates are not applicable to study abroad).  A number of scholarships are also available specifically for study abroad (see https://www.juniata.edu/academics/departments/international/ea/scholarships.html for complete list). The student is responsible for the passport, visa and airline tickets to program sites. Summer and short-term programs have specific fee structures; these are provided with the program information.

In each program, Juniata students are accepted into each host institution on a full-time basis and are treated as regular members of the student body, attending classes, writing papers, taking exams, etc., side-by-side with their counterparts in the host institution. In most programs, classes are conducted in the language of the host country; in others, (e.g., Czech Republic) classes are in English and the student also takes a class in the language of the host country to facilitate adjustment. Supervision for the student is provided by the host institution; in many BCA programs, there is a resident director whose sole responsibility is overseeing the program.

Occasionally, a student may desire to enroll in a non-Juniata program. Such programs must be offered by accredited U.S. colleges or universities or involve direct enrollment in an approved university outside the U.S. In either case, credit earned may be transferable to Juniata under the usual policies and requirements for the acceptance of transfer credit. To enter these programs, students need prior approval of the Dean of the Center for International Education, the Registrar, and the Dean of Students. Juniata grants-in-aid are not transferable to programs sponsored by other institutions. Procedures for receiving aid such as outside loans and grants are specific; students should consult the Director of Financial Planning. Credits from non-Juniata programs are entered on the Juniata transcript as transfer credits; grades are not indicated


Study Abroad Scholarships

Juniata offers a number of scholarships that are designated specifically for study abroad
https://www.juniata.edu/admission/scholarships-and-aid/

https://www.juniata.edu/services/catalog/section.html?s1=academic&s2=international_activities

 

Internships

An internship is a structured learning experience in which a student applies concepts learned in the classroom to the workplace. The primary purpose of an internship is to provide an academically valid pre-professional work experience for the development of the student’s communication, interpersonal, and professional skills. Interns receive practical training in a variety of settings through cooperatively arranged placements. Interns are given responsibilities that are high quality, and interns work side-by-side with other employees. Internships may be done either for credit (typically during the junior or senior year) or as non-credit, transcript notation internships (often paid and completed during the summer). More than 75% of Juniata students participate in at least one internship.


Internships for Credit

Advisor: Director of Career Services

 

The primary distinction between credit and non-credit internships is the degree to which students are required to reflect on their experiences. Students apply theoretical concepts in the workplace, reflect on the experience, and then reassess ideas. Academic credit is earned for the work and for placing the pre-professional experience in a conceptual and comparative context. Additional differences in the academic requirements between credit and non-credit internships include the degree of College supervision, the duration of the experience, the investment of College resources, and the student’s payment for and receipt of credit.

Internships for credit may be arranged in virtually any academic area and vary in duration and in credit earned from 4 credits to 15 credits. A student may apply a maximum of 15 credit hours of internship toward their degree at Juniata. Placements are arranged through the cooperative efforts of the student, the faculty sponsor, and Career Services. Nearly 100 students participate in credit internships each year. Examples of internships include: Allegheny Heritage Development Corporation, Alliance to Save Energy, Altoona Curve, Altoona Family Physicians, American Red Cross, Antietam National Battlefield, Brethren Volunteer Services, Camp Blue Diamond, DuPont, Enterprise Holdings, Ernest & Young, Fidelity Investments, Fort Roberdeau Historic Society, Geisinger Medical Center, Hershey Medical Center, Highmark , Huntingdon County Office of Business & Industry, J.C. Blair Memorial Hospital, Jekyll Island Authority, La Jolla Playhouse, Lake Raystown Resort and Lodge, Mutual Benefit Group, National Institute of Health, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Northwestern Mutual Life, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Engineering, PA Game Commission, PA Department of Environmental Protection, PA State Correctional Institutions, Partners for the Americas, Pittsburgh Zoo, Shaver’s Creek Environmental Center, Smithsonian Conservatory Biology Institute, TE Connectivity, United Nations,WPSX - TV, local law offices, medical offices, and social service agencies.

Guidelines for credit is as follows:


Students pursuing a credit internship must be of junior or senior status, have a 2.0 cumulative grade point average, and be in good academic standing.  Individual departments may set additional requirements including a higher GPA standard. 

The internship is typically designated as course 490 in the appropriate department (“Internship”) and carries two to nine credits. Credit is awarded in proportion to the time spent on the job according to the following figures:

                                2 credits = 8 hours/week

                                3 credits= 12 hours/week

                                4 credits= 16 hours/week

                                5 credits= 20 hours/week

                                6 credits= 24 hours/week

                                7 credits= 28 hours/week

                                8 credits= 32 hours/week

                                9 credits= 36 hours/week

Grading is based on the following criteria: supervision by the placement supervisor; contact with the faculty sponsor; a written learning contract, and a final evaluation conducted by all three individuals.

The internship seminar is designated as course 495 in the same department (“Internship Seminar”) for two to six credits. Credit for this course is awarded in proportion to time spent working with the faculty member as follows:

                                2 credits= 6 contact or study hours/week

                                3 credits= 9 contact or study hours/week

                                4 credits= 12 contact or study hours/week

                                5 credits= 15 contact or study hours/week

                                6 credits= 18 contact or study hours/week

Grading for the seminar is based on regular contact with the faculty sponsor; a journal/log of activities, an extensive written project, paper, or program as arranged with and periodically reviewed by the faculty sponsor and if appropriate, a portfolio of work completed.

Examples of past seminar requirements are:

2 credits: Journal of activities, outline of final paper, final paper, talk to student group;

                Work journal, portfolio, annotated bibliography, oral presentation;

                Journal, public presentation, short assignment, term paper;

                Meet with sponsor, submit copies of projects, descriptive analysis of operations at placement.

3 credits: Log and annotated bibliography, research project and report, self-evaluation of performance, weekly meeting with sponsor;

                Read three books, daily journal, 15-20 page research paper,

                Journal, abstracts, outline of final paper, final paper, talk to student group.

4 credits: Daily journal, two book reviews, outline of research paper, major research paper, weekly meetings with sponsor.

6 credits: Daily journal on significant events, weekly meetings with sponsor, three major research projects.

The intern must fulfill any additional departmental requirements provided these requirements do not conflict with internship policies.


Non-Credit Summer Internships

 

Exciting opportunities are available for Juniata students in virtually every academic area, and Career Services is available to assist students in finding academically-meaningful positions. Students must have a minimum GPA of 2.0 and have completed a minimum of 12 credits hours in courses directly related to the internship prior to applying for a transcript notation internship, and must submit a learning agreement plan. With few exceptions, summer internships are not for credit, but can be officially noted on the student's transcript as an academically-valid experience. Approximately 150 students participate in this program each summer.  Note:  Transcript Notation internships can also take place during the academic year.  There is a maximum of two notations in a single summer and one per academic semester.

The College encourages organizations to pay summer interns, and students have earned from minimum wage to $21.50/hour. To qualify for transcript notation, an internship must last for a minimum of 240 hours and should be directly related to the student's P.O.E. Each intern is evaluated by his/her supervisor, and must make a presentation on the experience. If the Internship is deemed appropriate and successful, the experience will be noted on the student transcript; e.g., ABC Employer, BI XX1 Internship: Biomedical Technician, Harrisburg, PA or EB XX1 Internship: XYZ Employer, Retail Sales/Marketing, Seattle, WA. While most students live and work near home, many students have taken advantage of summer internships as a way to travel and live in other areas. Students have interned in locations ranging from Hawaii to California and in organizations such as: Abbott, African Wildlife Foundation, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Geisinger Medical Center, Hershey Entertainment & Resorts, Human Rights Campaign, Johns Hopkins University, Long Island Rough Riders, PA Lions Beacon Lodge Camp, Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, Philadelphia Zoo, Penn State College of Medicine, Secular Student Alliance, Tom Steel Clinic, UPMC, Yale School of Medicine.


 

Urban Semester Experiences

Juniata is affiliated with several urban semester internship experience programs including: the Philadelphia Center, the Washington Center, and the Washington Internship Institute. In all these experiences, students typically earn 15 academic credits, but only a limited number (2-3) of individuals may participate annually. Approval by the Internship Committee is on a competitive basis. Program costs vary and students may be responsible for any costs above and beyond tuition and room fees paid to Juniata. Students may plan to participate in these programs during their junior or senior year. One year international students (and other students not seeking a degree at Juniata and/or attending Juniata for one year or less) are not eligible to participate. The application deadline is December 1 of the academic year prior to planned participation and is made through the Director of Career Services. A faculty sponsor is required.


Washington Internship Institute

Advisor:  Director of Career Services

Students participating in WII's internship program work four days per week and attend the fifth day seminar to process their experiences.  Students actively create and shape personal and professional learning goals by utilizing the three experiential learning components which guide the program:  knowledge, activity and reflection.  Past internship placements include:  CNN, FAA, American Red Cross, Amnesty International, and others.  Housing (excluding board) is provided. 

*Participation requires approval by the Internship Committee- Deadline to apply:  December 1 of the academic year prior to planned participation.


Philadelphia Center

Advisor: Director of Career Services

The Philadelphia Center program is open to students regardless of academic field. Through cooperation with the Great Lakes Colleges Association, students may spend a semester interning in Philadelphia, gaining firsthand insight into potential careers and exposure into the issues and problems confronting our cities. Blending theory and direct experience, each program includes a supervised internship for four days per week in business, industry, social service agencies, medical facilities, political offices, schools and other organizations. Seminars, academic classes and/or research projects provide academic complements. Assistance in locating housing is provided.

*Participation requires approval by the Internship Committee – Deadline to apply: December 1 of the academic year prior to planned participation.


 

Washington Center

Advisor: Director of Career Services

Under a cooperative arrangement with the Washington Center, Juniata students may participate in internships in Washington, D.C., in nearly every academic field. Internship placement assistance is available to help students secure meaningful, relevant placements. Interns work four days per week and attend seminars, political, and cultural events the fifth day. Internship placements include public administration, congressional offices, lobbying associations, and public interest organizations like Common Cause and the Environmental Policies Center. Housing (excluding board) is provided.

*Participation requires approval by the Internship Committee – Deadline to apply: December 1 of the academic year prior to planned participation.

 

Special Juniata Programs

Degree Completion Programs

The Degree Completion programs are designed for Juniata College students who are not GPA deficient and wish to complete the requirements to earn a Juniata degree.

How you can reapply:

The readmission process requires the students contact the Dean of Students Office for readmission for degree seeking status. These students do not enter through Enrollment admissions as they are not first time degree seeking students. Once they have been cleared by the Dean of Students records for any behavioral sanctions, they are forwarded to the Registrar’s Office for re-admittance.

Walker Program:

Students who have not completed their Walker requirements and/or who are returning full-time to complete their degree:

Completion Program:

It is designed for those former students who need to earn 30 semester credits or less to meet their degree requirements.

Students may transfer in credits if the student has not exhausted the current transfer credit policy. A $300.00 administrative fee is applied when accepted into the program.

Deadlines to apply for readmission to Juniata in the Degree Completion program:


Academic Amnesty Program

Broad Guidelines:

Masters Programs at Juniata

Masters of Nonprofit Leadership

NP-530   Conflict and Change (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) This course provides the student with an introduction to the study and conflict and its resolution. We will explore the basic theoretical concepts of the field and apply this knowledge as we learn and practice skills for analyzing and resolving conflicts. The first section of the course examines the causes of conflict and explores methodologies for understanding, analyzing, and responding to them. The second section of the course focuses on skills for waging conflicts productively, and for resolving and transforming them. Throughout the course we will examine conflicts occurring within different contexts that stem from a variety of needs and interests.

NP-540   Social Entrepreneurship (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) The goal of the class is to expose students to the field of social entrepreneurship, with a particular emphasis on understanding how social entrepreneurs effect positive social change. The course aims to provide you with a comprehensive overview of the emerging field of social entrepreneurship, understand what makes it distinctive from traditional entrepreneurship, and identify and understand the framework needed to start and grow a sustainable social venture. The course will explore the assessment of the variations of social entrepreneurship, from the creation of an organization aimed at creating positive social change, to social responsibility initiatives within the concept of corporate social entrepreneurship.

NP-590   Internship (Variable; Variable; 2.00-9.00 Credits) See catalog

NP-594   Internship Seminar (Variable; Variable; 2.00-6.00 Credits) See catalog

NP-595   Capstone (Variable; Yearly; 3.00-6.00 Credits) The Nonprofit MA capstone is designed to provide students with the opportunity to synthesize the materials they have worked with over the course of the program. The capstone provides students with a critical learning opportunity either in the form of public service project where students work with a client organization on a specific challenge or task, or conduct original research. The capstone project provides students with the opportunity to pursue a specific body of knowledge within a particular context, thus honing their expertise in a specific knowledge area, while also developing research skills, gathering and analyzing data, and in the case of a project, the opportunity to apply their knowledge and skills to a real-time need. Students are encouraged to work in teams to complete the capstone project.

NP-599   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-6.00 Credits) Allows departments to offer subjects not normally taught.

Masters of Organizational Leadership

ORG-502   21st Century Leadership (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) This graduate level course is designed to strengthen students' leadership abilities by exploring leadership concepts, theories and student's experiences of leading. The role and function of leaders looks very different today than years ago. Change is the norm. Leaders must understand today's challenges and be able to function effectively given a borderless, multicultural, virtual, and diverse group of partners, stakeholders and constituents.

ORG-510   Organizational Communication and Culture (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) This graduate level course blends the exploration of a critical, theoretical understanding of organizational culture with the theories and skills of leadership and change, equipping students with the knowledge and ability to develop a healthy, successful nonprofit organization. As part of this course, students will explore how values shape and define organizational culture, along with management structure, geographic scope, size, client groups and governance structures. Students will develop the theories and skills needed to lead organizational change processes.

ORG-511   Quantitative Analysis & Research Methods (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) Quantitative Analysis and Research Methods will examine some of the principle analytical tools for decision-making in business and investigation in the social sciences.

ORG-512   Organizational Behavior (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) In this graduate level course students will understand and interpret the theories and professional practices as related to organizational behavior. This will help students to acquire and use vital business knowledge and skills, and will invite students to think critically. Students will be able to explain relevant business, organizational, and leadership terms, facts, and processes. This will help students to acquire and use business knowledge and skills, and will encourage students to identify and transform data into useful information for decision-making. Students will analyze information to inform organizational decisions. This will help students to acquire and use business knowledge and skills, will encourage students to identify and transform data into useful information for decision-making, will force students to think critically, and will help students to recognize and evaluate the broad effects of business decisions. Students will demonstrate professional communication skills. This will assist students, as they move forward into their lives and careers, to communicate professionally. Students, working in teams, will propose solutions to a business or organizational case. This will provide students with the benefit of learning to work as members of teams.

ORG-520   Strategic Marketing Management (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits) This course focuses on refining students' skills in comprehending marketing theories and measuring marketing strategies and seeing how the marketing tactics selected need to be in alignment with strategies, such as the selection of which businesses and segments to compete in, how to allocate resources across businesses, segments, and elements of the marketing mix iTn a dynamic competitive environment.

ORG-530   Conflict and Change (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) This course provides the student with an introduction to the study and conflict and its resolution. We will explore the basic theoretical concepts of the field and apply this knowledge as we learn and practice skills for analyzing and resolving conflicts. The first section of the course examines the causes of conflict and explores methodologies for understanding, analyzing, and responding to them. The second section of the course focuses on skills for waging conflicts productively, and for resolving and transforming them. Throughout the course we will examine conflicts occurring within different contexts that stem from a variety of needs and interests.

ORG-531   Profsnl Ethics & Social Respnsblty (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) This graduate level course examines the responsibilities of management and senior executives as they lead organizations. The course will focus on stakeholder management, corporate social responsibility, ethics and morality, sustainable development. Students will learn to analyze, question critically, challenge and change ethical and moral standards, priorities, points of trade-off and compromise to be applied to business and professional behavior.

ORG-542   Entrepreneurial Management (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) Entrepreneurial Management is intended for graduate students who are interested in exploring the world of entrepreneurship and innovation for the purposes of starting their own venture (venture creation) or helping existing organizations to develop new business opportunities (intrapreneurship). The course is designed to develop critical thinking and problem-solving concepts and promote self-exploration through the investigation and implementation of real business opportunities. The goal is to provide experiential and applied learning opportunities that develop the mindset, skills and competencies that enable students to create their own opportunities and function as innovative leaders in entrepreneurial or high potential firms.

ORG-571   Strategic HR Mgmt & People Analytics (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) This graduate level course examines the fundamental issues behind current theory, techniques and practices encountered in human resource management.

ORG-590   International Business Strategy (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits)

ORG-595   Capstone (Variable; Yearly; 3.00-6.00 Credits) The Organizational Leadership capstone is designed to provide students with the opportunity to synthesize the materials they have worked with over the course of the program. The capstone provides students with a critical learning opportunity either in the form of public service project where students work with a client organization on a specific challenge or task, or conduct original research. The capstone project provides students with the opportunity to pursue a specific body of knowledge within a particular context, thus honing their expertise in a specific knowledge area, while also developing research skills, gathering and analyzing data, and in the case of a project, the opportunity to apply their knowledge and skills to a real-time need. Students are encouraged to work in teams to complete the capstone project.

Masters of Business Administration

MBA-502   21st Century Leadership (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) This graduate level course is designed to strengthen students' leadership abilities by exploring leadership concepts, theories and student's experiences of leading. The role and function of leaders looks very different today than years ago. Change is the norm. Leaders must understand today's challenges and be able to function effectively given a borderless, multicultural, virtual, and diverse group of partners, stakeholders and constituents.

MBA-511   Quantitative Analysis & Research Methods (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) Quantitative Analysis and Research Methods will examine some of the principle analytical tools for decision-making in business and investigation in the social sciences.

MBA-512   Organizational Behavior (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) In this graduate level course students will understand and interpret the theories and professional practices as related to organizational behavior. This will help students to acquire and use vital business knowledge and skills, and will invite students to think critically. Students will be able to explain relevant business, organizational, and leadership terms, facts, and processes. This will help students to acquire and use business knowledge and skills, and will encourage students to identify and transform data into useful information for decision-making. Students will analyze information to inform organizational decisions. This will help students to acquire and use business knowledge and skills, will encourage students to identify and transform data into useful information for decision-making, will force students to think critically, and will help students to recognize and evaluate the broad effects of business decisions. Students will demonstrate professional communication skills. This will assist students, as they move forward into their lives and careers, to communicate professionally. Students, working in teams, will propose solutions to a business or organizational case. This will provide students with the benefit of learning to work as members of teams.

MBA-520   Strategic Marketing Management (Variable; 3.00 Credits) This course focuses on refining students' skills in comprehending marketing theories and measuring marketing strategies and seeing how the marketing tactics selected need to be in alignment with strategies, such as the selection of which businesses and segments to compete in, how to allocate resources across businesses, segments, and elements of the marketing mix in a dynamic competitive environment.

MBA-521   Health Economics (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) Health Economics uses microeconomic principles to better understand the history and current structure of America's healthcare system. Particular attention is paid to special interest group lobbying, ethical concerns, sources of inefficiency in the system and a historical analysis of how America's healthcare system got to its current state.

MBA-523   Managerial Economics (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) Microeconomics is crucial to understanding the environment in which a manager operates, and as such facilitates better decisions under uncertainty. The main goal of this graduate level course is to employ microeconomic models to guide business decisions and to analyze industries. Undergirding this goal is crystallizing one's understanding of the ethical tradition of the mainstream Neoclassical economic framework and other ethical traditions that critique the Neoclassical tradition.

MBA-531   Profsnl Ethics & Social Respnsblty (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) This graduate level course examines the responsibilities of management and senior executives as they lead organizations. The course will focus on stakeholder management, corporate social responsibility, ethics and morality, sustainable development. Students will learn to analyze, question critically, challenge and change ethical and moral standards, priorities, points of trade-off and compromise to be applied to business and professional behavior.

MBA-532   Financial Reporting (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) The course examines current practices in corporate financial reporting and fundamental issues related to asset valuation and income determination. The emphasis is on financial statement analysis and interpretation of financial disclosures to help improve risk assessment, forecasting, and decision-making.

MBA-537   Strategic Cost Management (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) An analysis of the use of cost accounting systems to accumulate and allocate costs to support decision-making and managerial control. Emphasis is on solving real business problems. We will also explore socio-economic theories of the firm so that you may better understand the reasons/rationale for the many cost management techniques and procedures used to aid in making business decisions.

MBA-541   Operations & Information Mgmt (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) Operations and Information Management is designed to expose you to many of the widely accepted quantitative and qualitative methods for solving a wide range of business problems.

MBA-542   Entrepreneurial Management (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) Entrepreneurial Management is intended for graduate students who are interested in exploring the world of entrepreneurship and innovation for the purposes of starting their own venture (venture creation) or helping existing organizations to develop new business opportunities (intrapreneurship). The course is designed to develop critical thinking and problem-solving concepts and promote self-exploration through the investigation and implementation of real business opportunities. The goal is to provide experiential and applied learning opportunities that develop the mindset, skills and competencies that enable students to create their own opportunities and function as innovative leaders in entrepreneurial or high potential firms.

MBA-561   Healthcare Operations (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits) To understand operations' role in healthcare, it is important to appreciate the complexity of the healthcare industry and current trends that affect healthcare organizations from an operational perspective. Changes include new regulatory requirements, payment arrangements, technology, patient expectations, and provider recruitment challenges. Operations leadership must work to balance these shifting-and sometimes conflicting-priorities while 'keeping the lights on' and continuing to seek new efficiencies, while meeting increasingly competitive quality and performance metrics.

MBA-562   Healthcare Financial Management (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) In this course, students will examine the key factors impacting financial management of health care organizations. The course will discuss tools and techniques related to healthcare financial management. Students will learn to analyze financial data of these organizations, with particular emphasis on the budgeting process and cost controls.

MBA-563   Healthcare Strategy (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) This course is designed to enable an understanding of competitive strategy in a rapidly changing healthcare industry. The course focuses on understanding strategy and market structure, and discussing common business models and strategies for growth, integration, and alliance in a healthcare setting. Class members will discuss the development and selection of an organizational strategy and leadership of strategic planning and implementation processes. With successful completion of the course, students will be able to articulate the importance of identifying stakeholders, values, mission and vision for an organization, and to identify internal and external environmental factors and issues that impact strategic and business planning and performance.

MBA-571   Strategic HR Mgmt & People Analytics (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) This graduate level course examines the fundamental issues behind current theory, techniques and practices encountered in human resource management.

MBA-580   Project Mgmt and Cntg (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) MBA 580 examines the challenges of providing project management in the information age of global and cultural contexts. Project management as manifested in today's workplace provides both opportunity and great responsibility. The role and function of project managers looks very different today than years ago. Change is the norm. Project managers must understand today's challenges and be able to function effectively given a borderless, multicultural, virtual, and diverse group of team members.

MBA-590   International Business Strategy (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) MBA 590 is an advanced level international business strategy course that focuses on the development of skills to understand a variety of business issues that professional managers face when managing organizations in international markets. Students will first develop an understanding of the conceptual frameworks that are the cornerstones for establishing global businesses. Specifically, the course will explore matters related to politics, laws, economics, cultures, ethics and norms that will affect how business professionals operate organizations in a global market. Students will be expected to learn tools relevant to international trade and investment that are critical to multinational enterprises (MNEs). Some of the key topics we will explore in this course includes entry mode choice, organizational architecture design, internal control and incentive mechanisms; and assessing the challenges of global citizenship, ethical behavior and corporate social responsibility for international business.

Masters of Data Science

DS-110   Intro to Data Science (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) This course introduces the student to the emerging field of data science through the presentation of basic math and statistics principles, an introduction to the computer tools and software commonly used to perform the data analytics, and a general overview of the machine learning techniques commonly applied to datasets for knowledge discovery. The students will identify a dataset for a final project that will require them to perform preparation, cleaning, simple visualization and analysis of the data with such tools as Excel and R. Understanding the varied nature of data, their acquisition and preliminary analysis provides the requisite skills to succeed in further study and application of the data science field. Prerequisite: comfort with pre-calculus topics and use of computers.

DS-210   Data Acquisition (Fall & Spring; All Years; 3.00 Credits; N) Students will understand how to access various data types and sources, from flat file formats to databases to big storage data architecture. Students will perform transformations, cleaning, and merging of datasets in preparation for data mining and analysis. PRE-REQ: CS 110 and DS 110.

DS-352   Machine Learning (Fall; Variable; 3.00 Credits; N) This course considers the use of machine learning (ML) and data mining (DM) algorithms for the data scientist to discover information embedded in datasets from simple tables through complex and big data sets. Topics include ML and DM techniques such as classification, clustering, and predictive and statistical modeling using tools such as R, Matlab, Weka, and others. Simple visualization and data exploration will be covered in support of the DM. Software techniques implemented in the emerging storage and hardware structures are introduced for handling big data. Prerequisite: CS-110, DS-110, and an approved statistics course: MA-205, MA-220, BI-305, PY-260, or EB-211.

DS-375   Big Data (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) This course considers the management and processing of large data sets, structured, semi-structured, and unstructured. The course focuses on modern, big data platforms suchas Hadoop and NoSQL frameworks. Students will gain experience using a variety of programming tools and paradigms for manipulating big data sets on local servers and cloud platforms. Prerequisites: DS 110 Intro to Data Science and CS 370 Database Management Systems

DS-420   Data Science Capstone (Fall; Yearly; 1.00 Credit) This course is a capstone experience for Data Science POE students and must be completed as part of a student's final 30 credits. It represents the summation of a student's Juniata experience and serves as a bridge to their future goals. Students will have the opportunity to both apply their previous data science skills and develop new skills through a data analysis project. Prerequisite: DS-110, CS-110, and MA-220 (or equivalent).

DS-490   Data Science Internship (Variable; Yearly; 2.00-9.00 Credits) See Internship in the catalog. Requires instructor permission. Corequisite: DS-495

DS-495   Internship Seminar (Variable; Yearly; 2.00-6.00 Credits) See Internship in the catalog. Requires instructor permission. Corequisite: DS-490

DS-500   Data Science Fundamentals (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits) A graduate level introduction to data science through a focus on the language R. Support tools and libraries such as Rstudio and the tidyverse will be emphasized. Students will complete the data science boot camp (a weekend in person intensive or online equivalent) at the start of this online course.

DS-510   Computer Science Fundamentals (Variable; Variable; 4.00 Credits) A graduate-level introduction to Computer Science Fundamentals through a focus on the Python language. Students will complete the data science boot camp (a weekend in-person intensive or online equivalent) at the start of this online course.

DS-516   Mathematics Fundamentals (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) Selected topics of discrete mathematics and linear algebra related to data science analysis techniques and algorithms.

DS-520   Statistics Fundamentals (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) Overview of basic statistical techniques including descriptive statistics, hypothesis testing, and regression.

DS-525   Data Acquisition & Visualization (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) A graduate-level introduction to retrieving, cleaning, and visualizing data from widely varied sources and formats. The student will use common data science languages and tools for extraction, transformation, loading and visualizing data sets. Project presentations will have an emphasis on communication skills. Tableau visualization tools and Python libraries are used.

DS-530   Multivariate Techniques (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) Multivariate statistical techniques including multivariate regression, logistic regression, and dimension reduction techniques. Students will get hands-on experience applying the topics covered to real datasets using R, a powerful and popular open-source statistical computing language. Prereqs: DS-516 and DS-520.

DS-552   Data Mining (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) This course considers the use of machine learning (ML) and data mining (DM) algorithms for the data scientist to discover information embedded in wide-ranging datasets, from the simple tables to complex data sets and big data situations. Topics include ML and DM techniques such as classification, clustering, predictive and statistical modeling using tools such as R, Python, Matlab, Weka and others. Prerequisite: DS-500, DS-510, or by permission

DS-570   Database Systems (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) This course focuses on database design and relational structures, data warehousing and access through SQL. Students will use SQL to create and pull data from database systems. NoSQL and data warehousing are also covered to give students the necessary background in database systems. Pre-Req: DS-510

DS-575   Big Data Techniques (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) This course considers the management and processing of large data sets, structured, semi-structured, and unstructured. The course focuses on modern, big data platforms such as Hadoop and NoSQL frameworks. Students will gain experience using a variety of programming tools and paradigms for manipulating big data sets on local servers and cloud platforms. Prerequisite: DS-500 or DS-510

DS-580   Data Science Capstone (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) Data science practicum requiring completion of a large-scale analysis project of a given data set. Written and oral communication skills emphasized. Prerequisites: DS-500, DS-510, DS-516, and DS-520, or instructor permission.

Masters of Bioinformatics

BIN-500   Bioinformatics Fundamentals (Fall & Spring; All Years; 4.00 Credits; N) Bioinformatics is the science of collecting and analyzing complex biological data. It is an interdisciplinary field that develops and applies methods and software tools for understanding biological data. Pre-req: BI-105, BI-106, BI-121, BI-122, CH-142,CH-143, CH-242, CH-243

BIN-516   Molecular and Cellular Biology (Either Semester; Yearly; 4.00 Credits) A comprehensive approach to the study of cells, with emphasis on molecular techniques and understanding the primary literature. Analysis of the cell at the molecular level emphasizes a unity in the principles by which cells function. PRE-REQ: BS degree in molecular biology, biochemistry or the permission of the instructor.

BIN-560   Genetic Analysis (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits) Topics covered will include basic and advanced topics in transmission, quantitative and population genetics, with emphasis on analysis. the methods that modern researchers use to discover gene function and molecular basis of adaptive or disease traits and how they are transmitted over generations in model and non-model species. Prereqs: BI 105/BI 106 or BI 101/102 or one year of college Biology.

BIN-580   Advanced Research Methods (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits) This class will provide training in advanced modern molecular wet lab, statistical and/or informatics tools. Bioinformatics skills will be related to assembly, annotation, variant characterization, and/or comparison of eukaryotic genomes and populations. Statistical analyses will be performed in R. Molecular tools may include DNA and RNA isolation, electrophoresis, restriction digests, DNA isolation from gels, PCR, sequencing, next generation sequencing and equipment maintenance. Core bioinformatics learning objectives will receive special attention. General skills include training students in the process and procedures of conducting meaningful and responsible research in Biology, including: deriving research objectives, experimental design, problem solving skills, responsible conduct.

BIN-581   Bioinformatics Capstone (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits) This culminating experience provides graduate students with the opportunity to engage in an independent, hands-on research experience for an entire semester. The research experience can be with private industry, academia, or the government and must be approved first by Dr. Lamendella. The experience must be immersive in bioinformatics and/or biotechnology, must have a data analysis component and the research project will be disseminated via both a written manuscript and oral presentation.

BIN-600   Environmental Genomics (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits) This course will utilize Microbial Community Analysis leveraging high-throughput sequencing technology to identify the microbes present in naturally occurring our man-made ecosystems. Students will learn both molecular and bioinformatics skill sets, as well as microbial ecology principles throughout this course.

Masters of Accounting

AC-532   Corporate Taxation (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits) This course is intended for graduate students who desire to learn how the IRS code applies to corporations,estates, and trusts. Tax research is emphasized. Prerequisite: The student must have been admitted to the graduate program in accounting at Juniata College.

AC-533   Government and Nonprofit Accounting (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) Governmental and Nonprofit Accounting is designed to provide an overview of fundamental concepts and practices used in accounting for activities of governmental and non-business organizations. Students will be familiar with recording financial transactions, preparing financial reports, budgeting, auditing, and analyzing the results for federal, state and local governments, colleges and universities, healthcare organizations and other nonprofits.

AC-534   Advanced Accounting (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) This course focuses on accounting theory and problems regarding complex transactions such as consolidations, reporting requirements and international standards. Also, the course will include examination of topics currently under review by the authoritative boards. Prerequisite:Bachlor degree and admission to the Master of Accounting program

AC-535   Auditing (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) This course provides an in-depth understanding of auditing theory and authoritative guidance. This course will include current auditing issues, including specific requirements for public companies.

AC-536   Federal Taxation of Individuals (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) Examines the federal income tax structure and its relationship to individuals and sole proprietorships. The course will explore the social, legal, economic, philosophical, and political considerations relevant when designing a tax system.

AC-537   Cost Accounting (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) An analysis of the use of cost accounting systems to accumulate and allocate costs to support decision-making and managerial control. Emphasis is on solving real business problems. We will also explore socio-economic theories of the firm so that you may better understand the reasons/rationale for the many cost management techniques and procedures used to aid in making business decisions.

AC-538   Forensic Accounting (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) This course provides an in-depth understanding of auditing theory and authoritative guidance. This course will include current auditing issues, including specific requirements for public companies. (Prerequisite: Bachelor degree and admission to the Master of Accounting program).

AC-539   Accounting Research (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) Under the guidance of his/her advisor, all MAC students are required to prepare and present a research paper on a relevant Accounting topic. Although this paper is not a master's thesis, it does encompass significant library research and data collection and may include reports on field research or case studies. Students should work with their primary faculty advisor in the development of the paper and presentation.

AC-563   Financial Markets & institutions (Spring; Odd Years; 3.00 Credits) financial Markets and Institutions is a graduate level economics course. Students develop a deeper understanding of the purpose of financial markets, what is required for them to operate well and why they sometimes fail, and also the important role of monetary policy in the economy. Prerequisites: EB222 and graduate status.

AC-564   Financial Theory & Analysis (Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits) AC564 Financial Theory & Analysis develops the skills and knowledge you need to effectively evaluate investment choices and put together an appropriate investment portfolio for an individual or an institution. Prerequisites: EB361 and EB211 or ND.SS214.

AC-599   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-6.00 Credits) Allows department to offer topics not normally taught. Requisites and fees vary by title.

Certificate Programs

The Genomics Leadership Initiative at Juniata College

The Genomics Leadership Initiative at Juniata College has been funded by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and National Science Foundation. The initiative seeks to achieve its goal by developing a genomics certificate program, a leadership module, and student summer research experiences.

GENOMICS CERTIFICATE PROGRAM:

Comprised of seven courses, the genomics certificate addresses both the science and the broader ethical, legal and social implications (ELSI) surrounding progress and discoveries in the field of genomics. The ethical, legal and social issues surrounding advances in genomics provides a strong focus for practicing a breadth of knowledge and skills; the understanding of the scientific foundation of genomics provides the focus for developing an interdisciplinary base and cross disciplinary understanding of the life sciences in an era of “big data”. To help support this part of the program the grant has also funded an ELSI faculty development workshop, a seminar series, stipends for faculty developing new or revised classes, and stipends for faculty to formally assess the learning gains of students as a result of programmatic activities.

What is a certificate?

In general, an undergraduate certificate provides an interdisciplinary curriculum that is not available within any single academic unit. A certificate offers the possibility of a more cohesive general education experience oriented around a theme and taught by faculty who work together as a group on an ongoing basis and have common inter-departmental learning objectives and assessments. The awarding of the certificate is noted on the student’s transcript.

Who is this certificate for?

Students intending to pursue careers in biological research and medicine are the primary target. However, students interested in careers in public policy, public health, law, and business will gain by developing similar competencies.

Why should a student get this certificate?

As cost of a human genome approaches $1000, appreciation of both the science and the ethical, legal, and societal implications of genomics has become an increasingly pressing issue. Design of the certificate was based on recommendations from a joint document between the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) and the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) entitled, “Scientific Foundations for Future Physicians.” This report emphasized the importance of integrative scientific approaches, scientific reasoning, intellectual curiosity, communication and decision making skills, adaptability, ethical principles, and understanding of patients as individuals and in a social context. HHMI has funded Juniata College to implement this certificate program.

Description and Goals of a Certificate in Genomics, Ethics, and Society

Comprised of seven courses, the certificate addresses both the science and the broader ethical, legal and social implications (ELSI) surrounding progress and discoveries in the field of genomics. No area of modern biology provides a more appropriate focus for combining the humanities and sciences than the ethical, legal, and social implications (ELSI) of the human genome project and the evolution of the field of personalized medicine. The subject cannot be completely addressed without the input of specialists working across disciplinary boundaries. The ethical, legal and social issues surrounding advances in genomics provide a strong focus for practicing a breadth of knowledge and skills while understanding the acts of judgment and social contexts involved in the development and application of scientific knowledge; the understanding of the scientific foundation of genomics provides the focus for developing an interdisciplinary base and cross disciplinary understanding of the life sciences in an era of “big data”.

Learning objectives

Students who attain genomics certification will be able to:

Describe the basic concepts and principles of genomics.
Explain the scope of genomics from genes to society.
Integrate knowledge of the chemical, physical, mathematical and computational bases of genomics.
Explain the importance of the place of genomics in the human effort to understand natural phenomena, including its history and social impact.
Be able to make and justify ethical judgments about genomics research and its uses in medical practice and elsewhere.
Use the skills and interdisciplinary perspectives of the liberal arts in understanding trends in genomics and communicating them to academic peers and others.
Apply the process of science to questions in genomics.
Demonstrate an in-depth knowledge of a selected field in genomics.
Progress into a leadership role, working with experts and non-experts, with an awareness of the likely results of one's actions and an understanding of how results might differ in different settings and different cultures.

REQUIREMENTS

Core Courses: All students pursuing a genomics certificate must take four core courses required for a genomics certificate. Download the Genome Certificate Sheet to organize and plan your course of study.

  1. Genomics, Ethics and Society (IC 203; Fall; MW 2-3:50PM; CWS prereq) A team-taught course that lays the foundations for interdisciplinary work on the ethical and social dimensions of genomics.
  2. A course covering basic molecular biology, genetics, and genomics:

Biology II BI 106; Fall; N division class; T/Th 9 to 10:20AM, or T/Th 1 to 2:20PM, Discussion Sections Weds 8 or 10AM; BI-105 CH-105 prereqs
Human Biology BI 109; Not for biology majors; Fall; N division class; MWF 9 to 9:55PM

  1. At least three credits of statistics:

Biostatistics with lab BI 305, Fall; N and QS division class; T/TH 10:30 to 11:50AM; Lab M 1 to 2:55PM or 3 to 4:55; BI105 or ESS100 prereq
Environmetrics ESS 230; Spring N division and QS class; T/Th 10:30 to 11:55AM; Sophomore standing
Introductory Probability and Statistics MA 220, Fall MWF 10 to 10:55AM; Discussion T noon; Spring MWF 1 to 1:55PM, TH 2:30 to 3:25PM; QS and N division class, prereq MA130.

  1. One course covering informatics and analysis of large data sets:

Information Discovery IM 241, Fall QS and S division class; T/TH 9 to 10:20AM; prereqs IT110 or IT111 or CS110 or Instructors Permission (Loren Rhodes)
Biological Sciences Research Methods (Lamendella, Buonaccorsi, and Keeney sections)
Even Spring Semesters (Buonaccorsi), N division class; MW 2 to 4:50PM; prereqs BI207 or Instructors Permission
Odd Fall Semesters (Lamendella), N division class; schedule TBA; prereqs BI207 or Instructors Permission
Even Fall Semesters (Keeney), N division class; schedule TBA; prereqs BI207 or Instructors Permission
Computer Science 110 section G only, Spring N class, MWF 8AM to 8:55AM
Unix CS 255U, 1 credit every semester, T 8AM, prereq Computer Science 110 or Instructors Permission (Loren Rhodes);

AND

Perl CS255P, 2 credits, Summer, prereq Computer Science 110 or Instructors Permission (Loren Rhodes), sophomore standing, self study

or

Python CS255Y, 2 credits, Summer, prereq Computer Science 110 or Instructors Permission (Loren Rhodes), sophomore standing, self study

Electives: In addition to the core courses, students must take at least three elective courses related to ELSI genomic themes:

Social History of Medicine History HS 211; Every Fall; May count as a either a CA, or an H or I division class. T/TH 1 to 2:20PM
Medieval Medicine: Health and Disease in the Middle Ages History HS 399, Every Spring. H division class. MW 11AM to 12:20PM
Doctors, Medicine and Literature Russian RU 299 01, Fall of odd numbered years. May count as a either a CA, or an H or I division class. T/TH 10:30 to 11:50PM, T Noon to 12:55pm.
Science and Human Values Philosophy PL 250, Spring of odd numbered years, H division class.
Moral Judgment Psychology 3XX, Every Summer online, S division class.
Leadership in the 21rst Century. Business EB 299, Odd Springs online (3 cr), S division class

AND Executive Leadership Business 199, 1 cr, Spring, 3PM, Weds.


Certificate in Geographical Information Systems

Geographic Information System (GIS) and spatial reasoning are a mainstay knowledge base for working professionals in environmental science, resource management, local and regional planning, disease monitoring and evaluation, real estate, military planning, and social science research. The Juniata GIS certificate program is offered jointly by the Environmental Science and Studies and the Computer Science and Information Technology Departments. We have two tracks to prepare a student for a career in any of the GIS fields. The first track has a focus on Environmental Science. This track has more courses in field methods in GIS and spatial analysis. The second track has a focus on Information Technology. This track has more courses in programming and data mining. the certificate is open to students in all departments as well as Juniata alumni.

Requirements for GIS (18-21 credits):

We have designed this certificate based on looking at successful programs. We have tried to match core strengths of other successful programs while differentiating ourselves based on our key strengths. The cores courses include

The ways we differentiate ourselves is through our strength in field data collection techniques for environmental sciences. We include tracks in Environmental Science and in Information Technology

The requirements of the certification are as follows:

Quantitative field intro (1 course) (4 credits): This section requires the student to have a quantitative introductory class in their field. The requirement of this course is that it has a lab or quantitative section where Excel or other spreadsheet or database program is used to compile and represent or analyze data. One course from the following:

Core Statistics or data analysis (1 course) (3-4 credits): One course from this section must be taken:

Core Geographic Information Courses (3 courses)(8 credits)

Field data collection component (1 course) (3-4 credits): This section is intended to have students exposed to the vagaries of field data collection. It is preferred that students collect spatially explicit data using GPS technologies or other spatially explicit survey methods. Database manage or other courses that explore the process of data collection will also meet this requirement.

Capstone or project requirement (1-4):

Table of Requirements

Environmental track

Information Technology Track

Requirement

Credits

ESS 100

IT 111/ CS110

Base Course

3-4

ESS 230 Environmetrics

Or

BI 305 BioStat

IM 241:  Information Discovery

Data Analysis and Discovery

3-4

ESS 330: Introduction to Geographic Information Systems 

ESS 330: Introduction to Geographic Information Systems 

Basic GIS

4

ESS 337 Advanced Topics in GIS and Remote Sensing

ESS 337 Advanced Topics in GIS and Remote Sensing

Remote Sensing and Modeling

3

One from

ESS 399 Ecology of Fishes: (3)

ESS 399 Forestry

ESS 399 Hydrology at RFS: (3)

ESS 399 Wildlife Techniques (3)

BIO 399 Field and Stream: (4)

ESS 350 Field Research Methods—(4)

GL 240 Geological Field Methods. I  (4)

CS 370 Database Management

Data Collection

3-4

Senior Capstone or Other GIS project

I4I or other project with Spatial Data

Capstone

1-4

Total Credits

 

 

18-21

Contacts:

Neil Pelkey, PhD.: Associate Professor Environmental Science and Studies and IT
Email: pelkey@juniata.edu or (814) 641-3589

Dennis Johnson, PhD.: Professor and Chair Environmental Science
Email: johnson@juniata.edu or (814) 641- 5335

Loren Rhodes, PhD.: Professor and Chair, Computer Science and Information Technology
Email: rhodes@juniata.edu or (814) 641-3620


Academic Planning, Policies, and Procedures

Academic Planning

Bachelor's Degree Graduation Requirements

I. Completion of General Education Requirements:

General Education Mission: General education engages students in common academic experiences that integrate learning across academic fields with distinctive ways of knowing and develop habits of mind necessary for reflective choices and effective action in fulfilling careers, engaged citizenship, and meaningful lives. All general education courses will make contributions to a student portfolio.

A. FOR STUDENTS MATRICULATING IN FALL SEMESTER 2019 OR AFTER:

First-Year Experience: First-year students take part in a two-semester course sequence (4 credits in the first semester and 3 credits in the second semester) designed to help prepare them for success at Juniata.
Ways of Knowing: The Ways of Knowing requirement teaches students to think critically and intellectually about the world, introduces students to different epistemological perspectives, and helps students realize the benefits of interdisciplinary inquiry and a liberal arts education. Because dialogue, debate, and active learning are central to the liberal arts tradition, Ways of Knowing courses will emphasize seminar formats or active learning and are capped at 28 students. Each Ways of Knowing requirement may be met through a single course or through a planned sequence of courses totaling at least three credits. To foster an awareness of how Ways of Knowing are similar or different, each course or sequence of courses must include some comparison with another Way of Knowing. Faculty and students will consider how this second Way of Knowing supplements our understanding of the course topic. All Ways of Knowing courses are thus at least partially interdisciplinary. Instructors of Ways of Knowing courses will identify with and demonstrate expertise appropriate to the Ways of Knowing category they are teaching. A course or planned sequence of courses totaling at least three credits is required in each of the following categories:
  1. Creative Expression: Students explore their own potential to produce creative work through the study of the creative process and the practice of creativity and self-expression. Students will acquire the requisite skills to produce or perform a work of art and will explore the role of artistic expression in society.
  2. Formal Reasoning: Students learn to think with rigor and precision through the study of formal systems and the application of deductive reasoning. Students will develop critical thinking and reasoning skills; use formal systems to identify, analyze, and solve problems; and critique current practices, structures, or claims through the application of formal reasoning.
  3. Humanistic Thought: Students learn to engage in theoretical, historical, or critical analysis of texts, art works, cultural artifacts, or cultural practices. Students develop the analytic techniques and interpretive skills to appreciate human experiences and their representations and will be prepared to ask fundamental questions of value, purpose, and meaning.
  4. Social Inquiry: Students will learn to synthesize and apply qualitative or quantitative research to analyze human behavior, social organization, and the capacities that make society possible. Students will use reason and evidence to recognize and analyze distinctive forms of human behavior and social organization. Students will reflect on how social processes influence understanding of self, interactions with others, or access to power and resources. Students will explore ethical questions raised by social inquiry and consider its role in relevant public practices, policies, or popular media.
  5. Scientific Process: Students gain an understanding of what is known or can be known about the world through the study and practice of developing hypotheses, making observations, analyzing quantitative data, and drawing evidence-based conclusions. Students will explore ethical questions raised by scientific inquiry and consider its role in relevant public practices, policies, or popular media.
Connections: Taken in the third or fourth year, Connections courses are team-taught by two or more instructors who bring different disciplinary perspectives to address a common topic. Students will learn to integrate knowledge and skills from multiple disciplinary perspectives to examine an issue through different ways of knowing. The Connections requirement may be met through a single course or through a planned sequence of courses totaling at least three credits.

Self and the World: How should we engage with the world? What responsibilities do we have to our local and global communities? Self and the World courses foster the capacities necessary for wellbeing and responsible citizenship. These capacities include ethical reflection and a sense of purpose, knowledge of how diversity shapes the American experience, and knowledge about global challenges and cultural diversity. Together, these courses encourage us to engage with human diversity, contemplate questions about a just society, and consider the conditions that foster individual and collective wellbeing. Because dialogue, debate, and active learning are central to the liberal arts tradition, Self and the World courses will emphasize seminar formats or active learning or projects involving collaboration with community partners. Students will complete each of the following requirements: U.S. Experience, Ethical Responsibility, Global Engagement, and Local Engagement.
  1. U.S. Experience: In what ways are U.S. experiences shaped by intersectional characteristics such as race, gender, and socioeconomic status? U.S. Experience courses focus on understanding the current or historical experiences of different groups within the U.S. (identified by, for example, gender, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, geographic origin, immigration status, age, ability, or religion). Classes will address intersectionality, which refers to how identity-based systems of oppression and privilege overlap, connect, and influence one another. Students will critically examine systems such as racism and colonialism and their use of power, privilege, oppression, marginalization, and structural inequity and how these systems are challenged by cultural resilience and resistance.
  2. Ethical Responsibility: What do we owe ourselves, our neighbors, and the world? Ethical Responsibility courses foster students’ senses of empathy and social and ethical responsibility. Students will learn to engage in ethical reasoning and take the perspectives of different participants in situations requiring ethical judgment. Students will assess their own ethical values, explore the social contexts of problems, recognize and understand ethical issues in different settings and traditions, and consider ramifications of alternative actions.
  3. Global Engagement: What challenges do we face as an increasingly diverse and interconnected world? How are our cultural values similar or different? Global Engagement courses help students develop the knowledge and skills they need to engage effectively with and adapt to a changing world. To fulfill the Global Engagement requirement, students must complete at least two courses totaling at least six credits with a Global Engagement designation. Semester- or year-long study abroad at a Juniata-approved site fulfills this requirement. Courses with a Global Engagement designation may be in one of three categories:
    1. World Language Study. These courses focus on communication in a world language.
    2. Short-Term Study Abroad. These courses focus on a study abroad experience, a portion of which includes a pre-departure component and a portion of which must be completed after study abroad to promote reflection on the learning experience. The study abroad experience must be linked to a Juniata course that together with the travel portion totals at least three credits.
    3. Human Cultures & Challenges. These courses focus on a people and culture outside of the U.S. or a global challenge.
  4. Local Engagement: What challenges do we face in our local communities, the places where we live out most of our lives with people of diverse lived experiences and varieties of perspectives? How are our values similar or different from those of our local neighbors? What are our opportunities to be agents of ethical change in meeting the needs of the people we live with in our local communities? Local Engagement experiences help students develop the knowledge and skills they need to engage effectively with the local communities they will inhabit throughout their lives. Local engagement options address specific learning outcomes designed to help students contribute their knowledge and skills to their local communities through meaningful engagement. To fulfill the Local Engagement requirement, students must complete a Local Engagement course of at least one credit that includes at least 15 hours of approved community engagement. Students must include documentation of the community engagement activity and reflection on the experience in their Juniata Portfolio

B. FOR STUDENTS MATRICULATING PRIOR TO FALL SEMESTER 2019:

College Writing Seminar (CWS)
This foundation course is required of all Juniata freshmen and must be completed by the sophomore year

Information Access Information Access is a one-credit course required of all entering students, first years and transfers, that ensures competency in the use of computing, network and library technologies at Juniata College.

Interdisciplinary Colloquia and Cultural Analysis Students fulfill one Interdisciplinary Colloquia (IC) and one Cultural Analysis (CA) course type requirement by completing a two-course sequence. 

Writing Requirement for IC and CA:    Cultural Analysis courses will build on the skills of insightful reading, analysis, and writing acquired in the first year of study. Courses will provide a basic familiarity with some concepts and methods of cultural analysis. They may be offered as either 3- or 4- credit courses. In CA courses, students will make use of both primary (textual or other artifacts) and secondary sources. (Secondary works are those which interpret primary sources, or develop a method for the study of primary sources.) These primary and secondary works will provide the raw materials for a synthetic project. Such projects will normally include either a synthetic paper of ten or more pages, or student-generated presentations or productions (for example, original art, music or drama) accompanied by a shorter written commentary. Any project must be designed to demonstrate the student’s capacity for independent research and critical thinking. Students will be expected to show an awareness of their own presuppositions and of the possibilities and limitations of their methods. Faculty members proposing courses must include in their course proposal an explanation of how course assignments will demonstrate the student’s capacity for analysis and synthesis with an appropriate degree of rigor.

Communication Skills In addition to the College Writing Seminar, students will take at least four "C" courses (minimum 12 credits), two courses or 6 credits must be writing-based (CW) and the additional courses may be speech-based (CS). One CW course must be in the POE.


A CW course devotes considerable time to the development and assessment of writing skills. CW courses require multiple writing assignments that total fifteen to twenty-five pages during the semester, though these totals may vary by discipline. The methods of teaching writing often vary by discipline and by instructor, but all CW courses explicitly address the mechanics of writing and editing. Consequently, the syllabus of a CW course indicates the specific writing goals of the class, the criteria by which writing assignments will be evaluated, and the writing or style manual(s) that serve as the basis of instruction. A significant portion of class time is specifically dedicated to learning writing skills. At least 35% of the final course grade will be determined by writing assignments.


CW courses are intended to help students develop, compose, organize, revise, and edit their own writing. They develop a student's abilities to identify and define a thesis as well as to collect, organize, present, and analyze evidence and documentation to disseminate knowledge. CW courses are not limited to English only.

A speech-based (CS) course requires at least 25% of the grade be determined by two or more oral individual or group presentations, and it fulfills two requirements: (1) The course aims to develop rhetorical skills necessary for effective and creative speech in individual, group or public presentation. This may include one or more of the following: speech design and delivery, listening, negotiation, leadership, persuasion, collaboration, or decision making; (2) The course offers students at least two opportunities to demonstrate these skills. Evaluation of the first opportunity guides improvement of the second.

Quantitative Skills To demonstrate quantitative literacy, students have two options: (1) complete a "Q" course; (2) complete a mathematical course (QM) and a statistics course (QS).  Q, QM and QS courses may be used in the POE.

Distribution Students must complete six credits in each of five categories: Fine Arts, International, Social Sciences, Humanities, Natural Sciences. In three of these five areas, at least three credits must have a prerequisite or be numbered at the 300-level or above. Distribution courses may count in a student's POE.

II. Program of Emphasis (POE)

All Juniata students will complete a POE, including a POE Capstone. The Program of Emphasis (POE) is Juniata's unique approach to focused education in an academic area of a student’s choosing. The POE is an opportunity for students to explore in depth a particular discipline (through a designated POE) or to craft an individualized plan to study an area (through an individualized POE).
III.  Juniata Portfolio

All Juniata students will complete a portfolio of their work from their general education courses and from their POE capstone course.

IV. A minimum of 120 credit hours with a grade of D- or better, including the courses described above.

V. A minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale.

VI. Policies

Residency - Students are allowed to transfer credits during their last semester within the provisions of the transfer policy. However, 30 of the last 36 credits must be taken in residence. There are degree requirements that are unique to Juniata
and may not be completed elsewhere. Students participating in cooperative programs, study abroad programs, and other Juniata-approved programs are considered to be in residence.

Effective Date - Students must complete the graduation requirements in effect on the date of their matriculation.

STUDENTS ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR ENSURING THAT ALL GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS ARE COMPLETED.


Advising

Faculty advisors are an invaluable source of support for students. At the time of enrollment, first-year students are assigned a program advisor who assists in orienting new students to College academic policies and procedures. By the early part of February of their first year, students choose their second advisor.  Students will have a program advisor to assist specifically with POE and career issues, and a liberal arts or general advisor to assist with general academic issues such as fulfilling graduation requirements. The liberal arts or general advisor teaches in a discipline outside of his or her student advisee's Program of Emphasis. Those students who do not choose a general advisor by the appointed deadline will have one assigned to them. For exploratory students, advisors can help identify potential areas of interest. At any time, students may change advisors, subject to approval of the Registrar, as long as one advisor is from the department most prominently represented in the Program of Emphasis (POE). Students pursuing dual fields of study should select one advisor from each area.

Advising is a crucial form of guidance for all students, especially for those individuals pursuing highly structured academic programs. During summer orientation, incoming freshmen work individually with faculty advisors in their area of academic interest to select and register for fall semester courses. Once the fall semester begins, first-year students meet with their Advisors to review course registration and make adjustments as needed.


Advising Planning Meetings and Program of Emphasis (POE)

During the spring semester, freshmen meet individually with both of their advisors to discuss course selection for the following year and to devise a four-year academic plan. The Advising Planning Sheet is available to assist the student and advisors as they map individual plans of study. The planning sheet contains areas to plan a POE and meet general education requirements, including: the liberal arts distribution (FISHN), Communication Skills (CW and CS), Quantitative Skills (Q), Interdisciplinary Colloquia (IC), Cultural Analysis (CA), College Writing Seminar (CWS), and Information Access (IA). The process of completing the document provides students with the opportunity to consider personal academic and career goals, and to begin to identify those courses that will provide the background, skills, and perspective needed to achieve those goals. In addition, it is an opportunity to consider internships, study abroad and other experiential learning opportunities.

During the spring of the sophomore year, prior to selecting courses for the following year, students must complete the Sophomore POE, which guides in planning their coursework. In addition to enumerating academic and career objectives, students sketch out a complete set of courses totaling 45-63 credits, and to explain how each course or set of courses contributes to the overall goals listed. Advisor-approved POEs are submitted to the Registrar. Failure to submit a POE by the deadline posted by the Registrar will result in a hold for future registration and a late fee of $50.

In the fall of the senior year, students are asked once again to review the POE they have on file. Again, changes can be made either by drafting an entirely new POE or by completing a minor POE change form. In some instances, the POE completed sophomore year will remain accurate and no changes are needed. The final document, due in the Registrar's Office on or prior to preregistration for the spring semester, is considered a contract between the student and the College; students who do not complete the courses they have listed or who do not have a POE on file, are considered to have failed to meet degree requirements and will not graduate. A $50 late fee may be applied.

List of POEs


Academic Support

Juniata students may receive assistance with academic coursework in a number of ways. Through QUEST, students may receive general academic counseling and study skills guidance on topics such as note taking and exam preparation. The campus-wide peer tutoring system offers individualized or group tutoring assistance with material in a particular course. Similarly, by visiting the Writing Center students may receive individual help on written assignments for any class. Students may take advantage of the Baldridge Reading Program, at additional cost, during the fall or spring semester to improve their reading comprehension and rate.


Peer Tutoring Program

Juniata offers a popular, campus-wide program of peer tutoring. Peer tutoring is available in any offered course to each student who desires additional help with subject material. Before requesting tutoring assistance for a course, students must discuss their academic performance with the course instructor and ask for his or her verbal permission; some faculty would prefer to work with a student during office hours before tutoring begins. In select courses, tutoring is offered in the form of group review sessions, and there are also small group tutoring opportunities in which two or more students work with a peer tutor.

A reasonable amount of tutoring is available at no charge to the student, but the number of hours of tutoring per week may not exceed the amount of time spent in lecture each week (three to fours hours/week would be the maximum).

Request for tutoring is seen as a commitment from the student asking for assistance and is an obligation that requires consideration and motivation. Tutees are expected to arrive at prearranged meetings appropriately prepared and to notify tutors when they are unable to make an appointment. A tutee who fails to show up for prearranged meetings more than two times will have his or her tutoring privileges revoked for the remainder of the semester.

Students/tutees understand that tutoring is a supplement to class preparation, class attendance, and faculty office hours assistance–it is not intended to replace any of these critical academic responsibilities. Students who are motivated to get the most out of tutoring find that the program is very successful for them.

All tutors have faculty recommendation, must make application for the position, and have an interview with a QUEST staff member. In addition, each tutor must attend one hour of training per semester to maintain the program's integrity and to help tutors maximize their tutoring skills.


Student Research and Scholarship

In preparation for graduate work, students are encouraged to engage in independent research projects as part of an independent study or internship or as a member of an upper level research-oriented course. All students conducting research are encouraged to present their work in a public forum such as the annual National Conference on Undergraduate Research (NCUR). Funding for instruments, supplies, and travel is available through application to the Scholarship Committee. Interested students should contact any of the following Scholarship Committee members: Professors Beaky, Biddle, Buonaccorsi, Muth, J. Tuten and Kruse. For more information go to the website address: https://www.juniata.edu/academics/research/student.html

Students with strong records of academic achievement are encouraged to consider competing for national fellowship awards such as the Rhodes, Fulbright, Goldwater, and Marshall Scholarships, and the Mellon Fellowship. Students with meritorious records are contacted by members of the Scholarship Committee and mentored through the application process. Most applications are due early in the senior year. Interested students should contact a member of the Scholarship Committee.

Academic Policies

Definition of a Semester Hour of Credit

Juniata’s guidelines for defining the approximate amount of work required for one semester hour of credit is as follows:  For a course composed of classroom instruction, a semester hour of credit would normally involve 14 to 15 meeting times each semester with each lecture class meeting for 50 minutes.  For one credit of a laboratory course the student should have three to four hours of laboratory instruction each week of the semester.

For each hour of classroom instruction the student is expected to do two hours of preparation.  Therefore, a typical three semester hour credit course over a semester would include 43 to 44 hours of class meetings and 86 to 88 hours of student work out of the classroom


Registration and Drop/Add

Normally students preregister for classes online midway through the previous semester, but registration changes can be made during the first seven class days of each semester, known as the drop/add period. During this period students may adjust their schedule by adding and/or dropping classes, and latecomers can register for the semester. Students make changes to their schedules with advisors’ approval. Failure to register during the scheduled preregistration may result in a late registration fee of $50.


Normal Course Load

The normal course load for freshmen and upper-class students is 30 semester hours of credit per academic year. Normally students who complete an average of 15 credits per semester graduate in four years. Freshmen often opt to take lighter loads during the first few semesters and heavier loads later.  Students must maintain at least 12 credits per semester to be considered full-time.  Any course load above 18 credits per semester is considered an overload and will have the overload fee applied to the student's account.


Overload Policy

In special cases, an upper-class student may register for an overload. An overload charge is made for all credit hours attempted above 18 per academic semester. The upper-class student who wishes to take more than 19 hours of credit must have an outstanding academic record, including satisfactory completion of all courses attempted and must obtain by petition the consent of the Student Academic Development Committee. No student may take more than 21 credit hours per semester.

Excluding advanced placement credit, freshmen normally are not permitted to receive credit for more than 34 credit hours that academic year. A freshman may take more than 18 semester hours of credit only during the second semester and must fulfill two special requirements: (a) satisfactory completion of all first semester courses attempted, and (b) approval by advisors and/or other appropriate faculty as determined by the Registrar.

If a student registers for an overload and then withdraws from the College, a refund will be made according to the refund policy explained under Student Finances. No refunds are given for course withdrawal from an overload after the drop/add period. Some courses extend over more than one term. All courses must be completed, however, within one academic year, not including the summer. All special arrangements for programs must be made in the Registrar's Office.


Auditing Courses

Persons who wish to audit classes may make arrangements with the Registrar to attend one or more courses without receiving grades, credit or FISHN/SKILLS. The decision to audit a course must be made by the end of the drop/add period. The transcript does carry notations of audited courses. Permission of the course instructor is necessary and an auditing fee must be paid at the Bursar's Accounting counter in Ellis. This fee is waived for students enrolled in a regular full-time Juniata College program, but occasional academic course fees remain in effect (lab and field trip fees, etc.).


Repeating Courses

Students who wish to repeat courses for which they have already received credit must obtain the permission of the Registrar. Although credit may not be granted more than once for a particular course, in cases where a course is repeated the highest grade will be used to calculate final grade point average.


Independent Study, Credit by Examination and Tutorial

A student may wish to pursue studies not listed as course offerings. In such a case, independent study may be appropriate. Requests for independent study are handled by the Curriculum Committee through the Registrar's Office.

Independent Study:

Students applying for an Independent Study (INS) must make arrangements with a faculty member and register for the course (using forms available in the Registrar's Office and on the Registrar's website) two weeks prior to the semester in which the credit will be earned. The instructor will designate a syllabus, text, or other materials required and will submit to the Registrar an explanation of course requirements (i.e., examinations, papers, and faculty-student conferences). A student may enroll for no more than two Independent Studies in a semester. An Independent Study is considered an upper level course; no more than two Independent Studies are permitted in a POE.

Independent Studies will not carry any FISHN or SKILLS distribution unless petitioned to the Registrar's Office and approved by Curriculum Committee.

Credit by Exam:

Students may be given credit for some courses without participation in class meetings but by meeting all other requirements of the courses. To determine if a course is available for Credit by Examination (CBE), the student should consult the faculty member who is currently teaching the course. If the course is not currently offered a faculty member who has taught the course at least once in the last three years may conduct the course on a CBE basis. A course may be offered CBE only to full-time Juniata students. CBE is intended to be used as an option when scheduling conflicts prevent a student from scheduling a course required for graduation, which will not be available in any other semester prior to their graduation and cannot be fulfilled by any other course. The decision to offer a course CBE rests solely with the faculty member responsible for the course, since not all courses lend themselves to Credit by Examination (e.g., courses dependent on discussions and field trips and laboratory courses). The faculty member currently responsible for a course is NOT obligated to offer the course CBE in a given semester, as each faculty member must consider their own previously scheduled work load. The deadline for CBE registration is the end of the drop/add period during the semester in which the course is to be taken. Independent Study and CBE courses are considered part of the normal load of a student and, if taken as an overload, are subject to the usual overload fee.

Tutorial:

In a tutorial (TUT) the faculty instructor and the student work closely on a regularly scheduled basis involving lectures, demonstrations, explanations, and evaluation. The purpose of the tutorial is to enable a student to pursue a study which is too complex either in nature or scope to address as an independent study. Through regular contact with the instructor the student will benefit of his/her expertise on a highly individualized basis. Some tutorials are arranged to assist the faculty with classroom activities and for review sessions for large introductory classes. No pay is associated with students who are earning credit for the course.

During the Summer Session, a student may register for one Independent Study, Credit by Examination, or Tutorial if enrolling concurrently in one regularly offered course.

All forms can be found here: https://www.juniata.edu/services/registrar/forms/


Summer Sessions

Juniata conducts a Summer Session program designed for a wide variety of students. The course offerings are a subset of those offered during the regular year and are similarly rigorous. During Summer Session, the normal class load is three to six semester hours per four-week term.


Student Classification

A student's class is determined by the number of semester hours completed in accordance with the following:


Full-time Status

A student is regarded as full-time if he or she registers for 12 or more hours of credit in each academic semester. A student who in the course of the semester considers dropping his or her credit load below 12 credit hours should confer with advisors and/or Student Financial Planning to discuss the consequences of this action.


Transfer Credit

Transfer credit is granted only for academically-valid courses in which the student earns a grade of C- or higher. Transfer credit is granted in the form of a comparable course, distribution credit, or elective credit. Credit is normally only awarded for courses taken at a similarly accredited institution.  Students who take courses at schools without a similar regional accreditation must provide syllabi for all courses for individual evaluation by the Registrar's office and departmental review.  If the course is too focused or outside our curriculum delivery, no credit will be granted.

Current students wishing to transfer credit back to Juniata must obtain pre-approval by completing a “Request for Clearance of Transfer Credit” form available in the Registrar's Office. On this form, the appropriate department chair will note the comparable Juniata course(s) (consulting as needed with the most recent instructor of the comparable course), and the student's advisors will indicate approval. For courses not deemed comparable with a Juniata offering, decisions will be made by the Registrar with advice from the appropriate department and the Student Academic Development Committee as appropriate. It is the student's responsibility to obtain information about the course and present this information to advisors and the department chair(s).

Students who enter Juniata with fewer than 24 credit hours may apply no more than 15 transfer credits toward a Juniata degree after their initial entry. No more than eight of these 15 credits can be included in the POE. Students who enter Juniata with 24 or more credit hours may transfer credit according to the following chart.

# of credits awarded upon entry

total # transfer credits allowed after entry

# transfer credits allowed in POE after entry

0 - 23.99

15

8

24 - 53.99

9

4

54 - 86.99

6

0

87 or more

0

0

Exceptions may be made for students participating in cooperative programs, study abroad programs, and other Juniata-approved programs. Students who have earned an associate degree elsewhere are awarded credit as indicated in the Admission section of this catalog.

Students taking a leave of absence to study at another institution whether abroad or domestic, that is not a Juniata-approved program, must obtain pre-approval by completing a “Request for Clearance of Transfer Credit” form available in the Registrar's Office. These requests are subject to the guidelines listed above.

Students who have earned an associate degree elsewhere are awarded credit as indicated in the Admission section of this catalog.  Students transferring to Juniata from an accredited institution without a degree (including those that previously attended Juniata) are awarded credit as indicated in the Admissions section of this catalog. 


Residency Policy

Students are allowed to transfer credits during their last semester within the provisions of the transfer policy. However, 30 of the last 36 credits must be taken in residence. There are degree requirements that are unique to Juniata and may not be completed elsewhere. Students participating in cooperative programs, study abroad programs, and other Juniata-approved programs are considered to be in residence. Any exceptions to the residency policy must be approved by the Student Academic Development committee.


Advanced Placement Credit

Juniata encourages students to pursue additional credits through the Advanced Placement process. Incoming freshmen with scores of 4 or 5 on an Advanced Placement test may be offered Juniata credits. Selected Advanced Placement tests have been designated by the appropriate academic programs as equivalent to one or more Juniata courses. If the student accepts Advanced Placement credit for such a test, the student is then exempt from taking the equivalent course(s) and in fact may not take the course(s) for additional credit. If an Advanced Placement test is not designated equivalent to a Juniata course or courses, general credits in the appropriate division (Natural Sciences, Social Sciences, Arts and Humanities) may still be offered.

Test scores arrive at the end of July and are reviewed by the Registrar's Office. During the first week of school, students will receive a letter in their campus mailboxes with a form that directs them to department chairpersons for discussions about whether they will accept their AP test scores for college credit and/or direct course equivalency. Such meetings should preferably happen during the drop/add period (the first 5 class days of the semester).

Please go to the Catalog to the Department page to see the specific policy for credit application.

A student who receives a sufficient number of Advanced Placement credits will be granted sophomore status.

To have your Advanced Placement scores sent to Juniata go to www.collegeboard.org/ap.


World Language Placement

In foreign languages, students are placed at the appropriate college level based on their years of high school language or a placement exam. If a student decides to decline the evaluated level assigned and prefer to take the introductory course, students will be advised that they can not count the course type of H or I for their FISHN requirements. It will be counted as basic general elective credit.

When students enroll in world language courses and plan to study for a semester in the target language and culture on an approved study abroad semester, students can have both requirements of IC/CA waived if they take one course beyond WL 210 in the target language.  English speaking placements would not count for this waiver.


International Baccalaureate

International Baccalaureate Diploma recipients are granted credit for one full year (30 credits) toward a degree at Juniata. Students who have an IB Diploma normally enter the College with sophomore standing. IB certificate recipients receive course credit for each higher level examination passed with a score of 5 or higher. To receive this credit the student will meet with the appropriate department chair or designee to consider the advantage or disadvantage of accepting credit. IB credits may be counted toward degree requirements.


Academic Integrity

All members of the Juniata community share responsibility for establishing and maintaining appropriate standards of academic honesty and integrity. Students oblige themselves to follow these standards and to encourage others to do so. Faculty members also have an obligation to comply with the principles and procedures of academic honesty and integrity. Academically dishonest acts include cheating, fabrication and falsification, multiple submission, plagiarism, unacceptable use of College computing systems or of electronic technology, abuse of materials, and complicity in academic dishonesty.

All offenses are reported to the Assistant Provost and all confirmed violations of the policy are kept on file until the student is separated from the College. If a student is accused a second time, the case can be automatically referred to the Judicial Board. Penalties may include, but are not limited to, the following: a formal warning; a reduced grade for the assignment; a reduced grade for the course; suspension from the College; dismissal from the College.

A more complete description of the College's policy on academic integrity and the procedures followed during a hearing of the Judicial Board can be found in the Pathfinder on the Juniata College intranet.


Leave of Absence

Students who want to pursue a program of study at another institution, engage in other off-campus educational experiences, and/or address personal issues without severing their connection with Juniata may request a leave of absence. A leave of absence is granted only with written approval from the Dean of Students Office in consultation with the Registrar. A student requesting a leave of absence must be in good academic standing. Absent extraordinary circumstances, a leave of absence will not exceed one-year.

Any student who plans to take a leave of absence should consult the Registrar, Student Financial Planning, and The Dean of Students Office.

Voluntary Medical Leave of Absence:

When a student's health impedes normal academic progress and/or a situation requires a student to leave the College for one or more weeks, the student may seek a voluntary medical leave of absence. A medical leave of absence is granted through the Dean of Students Office in consultation with the Registrar. The student will be required to submit supporting documentation from his or her medical/health care provider to substantiate the need for the leave. A student on a medical leave of absence will be required to submit documentation from his or her medical/health care provider attesting to the student's ability to return from the leave of absence (and outlining any reasonable accommodations, if applicable) prior to expiration of the leave of absence.

Upon receiving notification of an approved medical leave of absence, the Registrar will enter a "W" grade for all registered but not completed courses in the current semester. "W" grades are not calculated into the student's cumulative GPA, but may impact progress towards the degree standards. A student who is granted a medical leave of absence may still have financial obligations to the college. The student should consult with Accounting Services and Student Financial Planning to clarify any outstanding financial obligations.

Involuntary Medical Leave of Absence:

A student may be required to take an involuntary medical leave of absence in situations where the student is a threat to his own health and safety or the health and safety of others, or where the student's illness or behavior interferes with the academic pursuits of the student or others or interferes with the regular activities of the College community. The student will be notified by the Dean of Students of the reasons for the involuntary leave and any conditions for the student's return. The student will be required to submit documentation from the student's medical/health care provider attesting to the student's ability to return from such a leave (and outlining any reasonable accommodations, if applicable). Supporting documentation, along with the student's written request to return to the College, must be received by the Dean of Students at least 30 days prior to the first day of the semester in which the student wishes to return. This is designed to provide the College with sufficient time to evaluate the documentation and the student's request to return as well as to ensure that the student no longer presents any potential threat.

A student on an Involuntary Medical Leave of Absence will receive a "W" grade for all registered but not completed courses in the current semester. "W" grades are not calculated into the student's cumulative GPA and will not be reviewed for academic progress. Financial obligations to the College will be pro-rated based upon the date of involuntary medical leave.

Military Leave of Absence:

A student who receives orders to report for active military duty should contact the Dean of Students Office. The student should be prepared to present a copy of military orders (if timing does not permit an initial presentation of military orders, the student may begin the leave process by submitting, in writing, a personally signed request indicating times and dates of intended call-up). However, when available, a copy of the military orders must be provided in order for the leave process to be completed and any financial reimbursements made.

The Dean of Student Office will notify the Registrar's Office, Accounting Services, Student Financial Planning Office and if appropriate the Office of Residential Life to expedite the military leave of absence process. The Registrar will enter a grade of "W" for all registered but not completed courses in the current semester. If the leave occurs late in the semester, the student may arrange for a final graded evaluation of his/her course work or take Incompletes for all remaining coursework. The Registrar will add the notation of "Military Leave of Absence" to the student's transcript.

The Student Financial Planning Office will provide information on the status of the student's financial aid, including information on deferring any loan payments.

The College will refund complete tuition payments to a student who processes a military leave of absence for the current semester. Room and board charges will be prorated based upon the date of the military leave of absence (No refunds can be made until the College has received a copy of the military orders calling the student to active duty).

Upon completion of active military duty, the student will be automatically readmitted to the College by notifying the Registrar's Office in writing of his/her intent to resume academic study at Juniata . All rights, privileges, academic status and rank are resumed at the same level as prior to the Military Leave of Absence.

Medical Withdrawal:

A student may make a request for a medical withdrawal from a course, or withdrawal for other extraordinary circumstances, through the Dean of Students Office or the Student Academic Development Committee. A request for a medical withdrawal must be accompanied by supporting documentation from the student's medical/health care provider.

Upon receiving notification of an approved medical withdrawal, the Registrar will enter a grade of "W" which will not be calculated in the student's cumulative GPA. Medical withdrawals may impact College progress- towards-the-degree standards. Students are encouraged to discuss these implications with family, faculty advisors and counselors from Financial Planning or the Dean of Students Office.

Withdrawal from College:

If a student is considering withdrawing from the College, an appointment should be arranged through the Dean of Students Office. A decision to withdraw from the College may have broad implications including as to the student's financial aid. A student should meet with the Dean of Students Office to discuss withdrawal procedures and to complete the appropriate clearance forms.

If a student withdraws from the College during a semester, the Registrar will enter a grade of "W" for all registered but not completed courses. "W" grades are not calculated in the student's cumulative GPA, but may have other ramifications. Students who withdraw during a semester may still have financial obligations to the College. Students are encouraged to discuss these matters with family, faculty advisors and counselors from Financial Planning and the Dean of Students Office.


Principles of a Liberal Arts Lifestyle:

As a community, Juniata is dedicated to providing an academically rigorous and personally enriching liberal arts education. Students have a responsibility to expand and fulfill their lifestyles to embrace the opportunities that lead to well-rounded citizenship.

The Student Government of Juniata College, as servant of the students, approves the following principles of a liberal arts lifestyle, and believes that these principles serve as the vehicle to successful life experiences.

A Juniata student who fully engages in a liberal arts lifestyle:

Approved by Juniata College Student Government, April 14, 2006

 


Policy on Student Accommodations

The College makes reasonable accommodations for students with respect to disabilities, which do not impose an undue hardship on the College. If a student believes he or she requires a reasonable accommodation or has a question regarding educational services, activities, programs, or facilities that are accessible to or usable by students with disabilities, please contact the Director of Student Accessibility Services who serves as the point person and advocate for students with learning challenges.

Documentation

Students requesting reasonable accommodations with respect to disabilities must obtain and provide to the College current (within three years prior to enrollment) documentation of their disability before the start of the session in which they are enrolling and requesting an academic adjustment or services. This documentation must support both that a student has a disability as well as the necessity of the requested academic adjustment or services. The primary purpose of this documentation is to determine a student's eligibility for accommodation and, if eligible, to help the College work interactively with a student to provide appropriate services. The College is not required, however, to provide accommodations that would result in a fundamental alteration to the nature of the program in which the student is enrolled or seeks to be enrolled, would create an undue financial burden on the College, or which would pose a threat to safety and security. General documentation requirements include, but are not limited to:

The above criteria are general guidelines only; the type of documentation will vary according to the disability. For students with learning differences, it is preferable that the student provide a full and recent psycho-educational evaluation. In addition, in some instances, a student may be requested to provide updated or augmented documentation in order to be reviewed more fully before being considered for services. It is possible that in reviewing a student's specific accommodation request or the recommendations of an evaluator, the College may find that while the recommendation is clinically supported, it is not the most appropriate accommodation given the requirements of a particular student's academic program. In addition, the College may also propose accommodations that would be appropriate and useful to the student, but which neither the student nor the evaluator have requested. The College appreciates that student disability records contain personal and confidential information. Such documentation is maintained in a confidential file in the office of Student Accessibility Services and is considered part of a student's education record and will only be disclosed with a student's permission or as permitted by law (e.g., in the event of a health or safety risk). However, at times, in order to evaluate and/or provide requested or recommended services and accommodations, it may be necessary for the College to disclose disability information provided by a student or a student's healthcare provider to appropriate College personnel participating in the accommodation process and who have a legitimate need to know more and review the file.

If documentation provided by a student does not support the existence of a disability or the need for an accommodation, the student will be advised and will be provided an opportunity to supplement the initial documentation with further information from a physician, psychologist, or other appropriate specialist. In the event a student's accommodation request is denied, the student may appeal that decision by utilizing the appeal/grievance process found below.

Supporting Students with Disabilities

In its commitment to ensuring that no otherwise qualified student with a disability is subjected to unlawful discrimination in the context of his/her educational experience, the College makes certain that students with disabilities are provided equal access to educational and career development programs and/or student activities.  Consequently, as noted above, the College will make, on behalf of qualified students with learning and physical disabilities of which the College is aware, reasonable accommodations that do not impose undue hardships on the College. Students and their families are strongly encouraged to disclose and discuss possible accommodations during the enrollment process.

If a student believes he/she requires a reasonable accommodation or has a question regarding educational services, activities, programs, or facilities that are accessible to or usable by students with disabilities, please contact the Director of Student Accessibility Services, who has responsibility for students with learning challenges. All information associated with a disclosure of this nature is confidential, and the College will communicate this information to others only on a need-to-know basis.

Appeal/Grievance Process

Scope and Application: This appeal/grievance process applies to any student allegedly aggrieved by a denial (in whole or in part) of his/her request for an accommodation/academic adjustment under the College’s Policy Regarding Students with Disabilities or who otherwise has an unresolved complaint regarding his/her disability. The College commits that no retaliation will occur at any stage of this process.

Initial Time Period for Filing an Appeal/Grievance: A student alleging a disability and wishing to file an appeal/grievance hereunder, must initiate the procedure described below within thirty (30) calendar days of when the student knew or should have known of the action of which the student complains or is otherwise aggrieved by, including a denial (in whole or in part) of a request for accommodation/academic adjustment.

(A) The student or, any person(s) acting on behalf of the student, may file an appeal/grievance with the Office of Student Accessibility Services. An academic counselor (or his/her designee from Student Accessibility Services) will discuss the student’s complaint and attempt to resolve or adjust the dispute on an informal basis. The student may present any facts or circumstances he/she deems relevant to the complaint/dispute. The academic counselor may investigate the matter and gather any relevant facts and circumstances, including conducting interviews. The academic counselor shall render a determination within twenty (20) calendar days after being assigned to handle the student’s appeal/grievance. Within seven (7) calendar days from the date of the determination by the academic counselor that the complaint/dispute could not be resolved, the student (or the person acting on his/her behalf) must submit a written request for a further review by the Dean of Students to the Office of Student Accessibility Services and must document the student’s attempt to first resolve the appeal/grievance with the academic counselor. The written request must explain the nature of the student’s complaint/dispute and/or the accommodation/adjustment sought.

(B) The Dean of Students shall review all matters relating to the complaint/dispute as presented to the Office of Student Accessibility Services and may solicit additional facts and evidence as the Dean may deem necessary. The student may present any further facts or evidence he/she deems relevant. The Dean of Students shall complete the review and render a decision within twenty (20) calendar days after the appeal/grievance is submitted to the Dean of Students. If, after the Dean of Students has had an opportunity to render his/her decision, the student remains unsatisfied with the resolution of the appeal/grievance, the student, or person(s) acting on behalf of the student, may submit an appeal/grievance in writing, within seven (7) calendar days from the date of the decision by the Dean of Students, to the Provost. If no written request is submitted within the seven-day period, the decision of the Dean of Students shall be final.

(C) Upon the submission of the student’s written request for a review of his or her appeal/grievance, the Provost will consider all facts and circumstances, including the investigatory file as developed by the Office of Student Accessibility Services and any medical evidence presented. The Provost may also interview the student or such other witnesses as may be necessary. If, upon such inquiry, the Provost determines that a proper review of the matter was conducted, the decision of the Dean of Students shall be confirmed. The Provost may also amend, alter or revise the decision and, therefore, the Provost is responsible for the final decision. The Provost will render a decision within thirty (30) calendar days after the appeal/grievance has been submitted to the Provost as described above.

Academic Records

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) provides college students with certain rights relative to access and release of records that are personally identifiable.  Juniata College’s policy and procedures relating to FERPA are outlined below.

Student Records

Directory Information

Directory Information includes name, home and local address, home and local phone number, email address, POE, class level, co-curricular activities, dates of attendance, enrollment status, cumulative credit hours, degrees, honors and awards received, and College-sanctioned photographic imagery. College-sanctioned photographic imagery is defined as digital or photographically printed images captured and created by College-financed operations including but not limited to the Marketing Office, the Digital Media Studio, the Advancement Office, Student Services, and the Office of the Registrar. Juniata may use parents names to promote announcements of their student's activities.

Students may refuse to have the directory information listed above, or some of the categories, released to third parties by submitting a written request to the Dean of Students by the fourth week of any given semester. Juniata has determined that College-sanctioned photographic imagery is part of directory information, and thus is covered by blanket permissions implied in the Juniata policies regarding directory information.

Parental Notification

In the interest of promoting better communication regarding students’ academic and personal development, parents of dependent students may opt to receive copies of all correspondences involving violations, charges, actions, awards and citations that are sent from the Dean of Students Office to respective students unless we are asked not to send copies (hard waiver).  Revealing such information is permissible under section 4.1 Disclosure of Educational Record Information – 3i, which permits colleges to share educational records or components thereof without the written consent of the student to “parents of a student who have established that student’s status as a dependent” (chapter 5.3).

The Registrar’s Office will release grades and send copies of academic actions including academic probation, suspension and dismissal, to parents of dependent students provided there is a consent on file from the respective student.  If students would like parents to receive grade reports for the semester, the student must request a Final Grade Report each time the final grades are to be sent to the parents.  The Request for Final Grade Report form is available in the Office of the Registrar.

The Student Accounting Services Office will communicate with parents of dependent students about billing for course registration, room and board, and any incidental fees which are the responsibility of a registered Juniata College student.  NOTE: By registering, students are obligated to pay tuition, fees and other charges associated with the registration.  Failure to meet these obligations by scheduled due dates, may result in additional costs associated with collection efforts including late fees, collection agency commissions, court costs, and other collection costs that might be incurred.


Transcripts

The Registrar's Office maintains a complete record of a student's academic work. This record is available for inspection by the student and/or the parents of dependent students. For purposes of employment, transfer or further study, the student may request in writing that an official transcript of the record be sent to an individual or institution. Official transcripts are for the use of a third party and bear the College seal. Unofficial transcripts are for personal use by the student and bear no seal.

No transcript of a student's permanent record will be issued without written authorization from the student. No telephone or third-party requests will be honored. Members of the faculty or administration may have access to the records if they have a legitimate interest in and demonstrate a need for the information.


Grade Reports

Grade reports are available to the student through the ARCH at the conclusion of each semester. Students wanting to have a grade report sent to his/her permanent address or another third party must submit the request to the Registrar. The form is located in Founders Hall in the Registrar's Office.  

Academic Progress and Grade Reports

The implementation of probationary requirements and the determination of the fulfillment of graduation requirements are duties of the Registrar.  Notification of any action comes from the Registrar's Office and is sent to the student's parents unless the student sends a letter preventing such notification. Development and interpretation of policies are the function of the Student Academic Development Committee (SAD).

Advisors are notified of all advisees placed on academic probation, suspension or dismissal.


Grades

Grades are due 48 hours after the last exam or meeting time and are awarded according to the following scale.

A - indicates work of the highest excellence, showing a superior grasp of content as well as independent and creative thinking in the subject.

B - signifies unusual achievement wherein the student reveals exceptional insight and ability.

C - is given for satisfactory achievement on the college level where the work in the course has been conscientious and shows no considerable deficiency in either quality or quantity.

D - indicates that the work in the course is below the quality normally expected for college work, but is only marginally so.

F - signifies work which is distinctly unsatisfactory at the college level.

The above grades may be qualified by the use of a plus(+) or a minus(-). For the permanent record, a grade point average (GPA) is compiled and the GPA appears on the transcript. The following equivalents should be used for calculating the GPA:

S (satisfactory) or U (unsatisfactory). Performance in a few courses is graded as S or U , but in the majority of courses, the grades listed above are given. Only grades of A(-), B(+,-), C(+,-), D(+,-), and S are given credit toward a degree.

AU (Audit). Performance in a course that is audited is noted with the grade of AU. This is given regardless of the students' participation. Audits can not be changed after the drop/add period and it is up to the faculty to determine at what level a student should participate in their class. There is no withdrawal from audit coursework, if a student stops attending, they will still receive an auditing with no grade, credit or FISHN/SKILLS.

In addition to the regular grade designations, the following irregular grades are used as occasion may demand:

I (incomplete). At the discretion of the faculty member involved, a grade of incomplete may be submitted. This option is to be used sparingly, however, and only when the student has given a satisfactory explanation (such as extended illness or accident) for failure to complete a required piece of work. Otherwise, a student receives an F for a course which is not completed. Simple preference on the part of the student for an extension of time is not regarded as sufficient cause for granting an incomplete. Upon the granting of an incomplete, the student must complete the work within three weeks of the beginning of the next semester of the academic year or an F automatically will be recorded. Any exceptions to this policy must be approved in writing by both the instructor and the Registrar.

W (course withdrawal). Effective 2018 fall semester: A withdrawal grade of W is recorded when a student drops a course after the official drop/add period at the beginning of the semester and before the withdrawal deadline. W grades are not calculated into the GPA. A student may withdraw from a course, with documented consultation with the student’s current advisors, up to the withdrawal date listed on the course syllabus. If the instructor has not indicated a final withdrawal date on the syllabus, the default deadline reverts to noon on the last day of classes that semester.

- WF or WP (withdrawal). Prior to 2018 fall semester: A withdrawal grade of WF or WP was recorded when a student dropped a course after the official drop/add period at the beginning of the semester and before the withdrawal deadline.  WP signifies that at the time of the withdrawal the student was passing the course, while a WF signifies that at the time of the withdrawal the student was failing the course; WP and WF grades are not calculated into the GPA. 

Withdrawals will be considered complete when they are filed with the Office of the Registrar. Students who do not complete the withdrawal process will receive the grade currently earned at the time the course instructor submits final grades.

Withdrawal from courses may impact financial aid and/or inter-collegiate athletic eligibility. Students are encouraged to discuss these implications with family, academic advisors, coaches, and counselors from Financial Planning or the Dean of Students Office.

Exceptions to the Course Withdrawal policy may be made via appeal to the Student Academic Development Committee.

W (withdrawal from the College). If a student withdraws from the College during a semester with the Dean of Students approval , the Registrar will enter a grade of "W" for all registered but not completed courses. "W" grades are not calculated in the student's cumulative GPA, but may have other ramifications. Students who withdraw during a semester may still have financial obligations to the College. Students are encouraged to discuss these matters with family, faculty advisors and counselors from Financial Planning and the Dean of Students Office.

If students withdraw from all classes (withdrawal from the College), they must apply to the Student Academic Development Committee through the Registrar to be readmitted.


Grade Appeals

The assignment of grades for academic work is an important matter which falls within the professional responsibility of each individual faculty member. Grades are determined in such a way as to reflect as accurately as possible student performance according to criteria available to the student and to protect the academic freedom both of the faculty member and the student. There is an inherently subjective element to grading, but it does not follow from this that grading is done in an arbitrary fashion.

A student may dispute a grade given in or for a course. When this occurs, the student should follow the appeal procedure outlined below. The faculty member issuing the grade has final authority and responsibility for determining that grade.


Academic Standards of Progress

The maintenance of good academic standing requires students to meet several standards.

Any student whose semester or cumulative grade point average at any time falls below 1.00 may be academically dismissed. Any student whose semester grade point average falls below 1.66 at any time will be placed automatically on academic probation. In addition, any student whose cumulative average falls below those in the following table will be placed on academic probation. In addition to meeting the grade point average requirements, students must show appropriate progress toward degree completion. Full-time students must successfully complete 24 academic credits prior to the beginning of the third semester; 48 academic credits prior to the beginning of the fifth semester; and 72 academic credits prior to the beginning of the seventh semester. Any student failing to meet these standards is placed on Academic Probation and is required to complete 12 credits in the subsequent semester. Failure to complete 12 credits (in the subsequent semester) results in suspension or dismissal. A second failure to meet these standards of progress will result in suspension or dismissal. Students have the right to appeal suspension and dismissal.

Credit Hours Attempted Grade Point Average

Students on Academic Probation will be evaluated at mid-term to determine adherence to Academic Probation contracts. Students failing to meet requirements of Academic Probation contracts may be suspended or dismissed at mid-semester. Students have the right to appeal suspension and dismissal. Students on probation must achieve good standing in the next semester or face suspension or dismissal. In addition, any student who accumulates three semesters of probation will be suspended or dismissed. Also, any student on academic probation will be counseled regarding possible limitation or curtailment of his or her participation in co-curricular and/or employment activities. Students who have not satisfactorily completed the College Writing Seminar course by the end of the sophomore year are automatically dismissed. Academic Standards of Progress are established by the faculty and monitored by the Student Academic Development Committee in conjunction with the Registrar.

The implementation of probationary requirements and the determination of the fulfillment of graduation requirements are duties of the Registrar. Notification of any actions comes from that office and are sent to a student's parents unless the student signs a form preventing such notification. Development and interpretation of policies are the function of the Student Academic Development Committee.


Dean's List

At the end of each semester, the Provost announces the Dean's List. Matriculated students are named to the Dean's List when they meet all of the following requirements:

1) They have taken at least 12 graded credits during the term.

2) They achieve a term grade point average of 3.60 or better.

3) They have no unsatisfactory grades during that term. Grades that are defined as unsatisfactory are F (failing), U (unsatisfactory), I (incomplete), and NP (no pass).

A notation of Dean's List achievement appears on the transcript.

Juniata students studying abroad will not be eligible for the Dean's List.  Students who are partner degree visiting students and visiting non-degree students are also not eligible for this notation.


Graduation Honors

Honors are conferred at commencement ceremonies according to the following grade point average scale:

Students who are partner degree visiting students are not eligible for graduation honors.


Honor Societies

The Juniata College Honor Society is a group of junior and senior students elected on the basis of outstanding academic achievement and leadership ability. Other honor and honorary societies on campus also recognize students for their accomplishments: Beta Beta Beta (biology), Lambda Pi Eta (speech communication), The Masque (theatre), Omicron Delta Kappa (leadership), Phi Alpha (social work), Phi Alpha Theta (history), Pi Lambda Theta (education), Pi Sigma Alpha (politics), Psi Chi (psychology), Rho Epsilon Chapter of Gamma Sigma Epsilon (chemistry), Sigma Gamma Epsilon (geology), Sigma Iota Rho (international studies), Sigma Pi Sigma (physics), Sigma Tau Delta (english) and Tau Pi Phi (accounting, business and economics).


Distinction in the Program of Emphasis

To achieve distinction in the Program of Emphasis, a student must fulfill all graduation requirements and a senior experience that integrates several areas of their POE.  This requirement can be fulfilled in many ways.  Some possibilities might include: an original independent creative project that involves significant academic work, such as laboratory research resulting in a significant report; a major paper on a well-defined project; a body of artistic work equivalent to a major exhibition or performance; or field experience (e.g. student teaching or certain internships) culminating in a significant report. The project must be evaluated and judged worthy of distinction in the POE by two faculty members, at least one of whom must be from the home department. The project must also be presented in a forum open to all interested parties, either at Juniata or to an outside audience such as the National Conference on Undergraduate Research (NCUR).

Departments and programs will be free to establish further requirements for receiving distinction in the POE, including higher GPA requirements.

Departments shall forward the names of successful candidates for distinction to the Registrar's Office.

 

 

 

Co-Curricular Life

Student Life

Athletics and Recreation

 

The commitment of the Juniata College Athletic Department is explicitly linked to the educational mission of the institution. Juniata athletics emphasizes fair play and sportsmanship co-existing with a high degree of competitiveness in all varsity programs. Such competitiveness applies as well to the academic efforts of Juniata student-athletes. Care is taken to assure the overall health and well-being of students in and outside of the training and competitive arenas. The dynamics of equitable and fair treatment of men and women within Juniata athletics is thoroughly examined and pursued.

The College promotes recreation, physical activity, and athletic programs for all students. Intercollegiate varsity sports offered for men: baseball, basketball,  cross country, football, soccer, tennis, track (indoor and outdoor), and volleyball; for women: basketball, cross country, field hockey, soccer, softball, swimming, tennis, track (indoor and outdoor), and volleyball. In addition, clubs compete in a variety of sports largely determined by the interest of the student body. Active clubs include, or have included, men's and women's rugby, ultimate frisbee, men's and women's lacrosse, equestrian, and golf. A variety of recreational clubs ranging from skiing and snowboarding to dance and the martial arts are also available.

Intramural programs include: basketball, indoor soccer, and bowling.

Juniata is a Division III member of the NCAA, the Eastern Collegiate Athletics Conference (ECAC), the Landmark Conference, the Centennial Conference (football only), and the Continental Volleyball Conference (men's volleyball only).

The Kennedy Sports+Recreation Center includes a 25 meter natatorium, a fully equipped 5,500 sq. ft. Fitness Center, two separate gymnasiums for volleyball and basketball, two handball/racquetball courts, and an indoor walking track. Outdoor facilities feature playing fields for football, soccer, field hockey, baseball and softball as well as seven tennis courts and a eight-lane track.

Beyond the facilities explicitly provided by the College, the Huntingdon area is rich with opportunities for fishing, hunting, hiking, boating, canoeing, rafting, swimming, camping, downhill and cross-country skiing and golf.


Community Service

Over 70% of Juniata students participate in Community Service.  Students perform service in many ways: individually, through class, as part of their residence hall, or through the many student service organizations on campus such as Habitat for Humanity, Circle K, Health Occupations Students of America (HOSA), Colleges Against Cancer, and Big Brothers Big Sisters. Registered student organizations are supported with community contacts through the Community Service Office.  Throughout the year, Juniata hosts many campus-wide service events including American Red Cross Blood Drives, Special Olympics, Relay for Life and numerous "service days".  In addition, the Community Service Office offers service-learning alternative break trips to inspire global action and awareness.  In order to recognize the efforts of those students who consistently perform service, the Community Service Office coordinates transcript notation for those who perform at least 120 hours of non-paid, non-credit volunteer work over their college careers.  Students can begin tracking their service hours for service notation the fall semester of freshman year and can count all service until graduation, including summer service.  Information and materials to initiate the Community Service Notation are available in the Community Service Office.

Community Work Study

The Community Work Study Program places Federal Work Study-eligible students at community agencies across Huntingdon County for part-time employment in service to the community. Students earn minimum wage while aiding organizations. Tutoring programs such as the Huntingdon Community Center After-School Program, the Salvation Army ARC of Learning Program and the Bethel AME After-School program work with Huntingdon County youth. There are also positions available with other agencies. Information, position descriptions, and applications are available in the Community Service Office


Diversity and Inclusion

Please visit the Office of Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion website at https://www.juniata.edu/offices/diversity/

First Year Experience

Orientation

The Summer Orientation program consists of parallel programs for new students and their parents. The orientation program includes faculty advising for class registration, discussions on residential living, and sessions on various other adjustment concerns. Parents meet in groups with college administrators and faculty to share concerns, discuss services available to both students and parents, and participate in question-and-answer sessions. Students participate in a variety of informational and social activities designed to help them become more familiar with college life and the unique traditions and opportunities at Juniata. Recreational opportunities are also a part of the Summer Orientation program.

Prior to the first day of classes, new students consult with advisors, confirm their course registration, meet with Residence Staff, and participate in planned college activities to inaugurate the new academic year.

The College also provides special orientation programs specifically designed for the following distinct student groups: visiting high school students, and international students.


Inbound Retreats

Inbound Retreats help first-year Juniata students become aware of and engaged in our academic and co-curricular community. New students arrive on campus early and participate in retreat options designed to provide a smooth transition into college.

Each retreat is led by two Peer Leaders who are upper-class Juniata College students and one faculty/staff advisor.

Goals:

Inbound Retreats is a social, transitional program for first-year students. Upon completion of the Inbound program through small and large group activities, students will:
• Establish new social relationships;
• Become acclimated to the campus and surrounding community;
• Experience less anxiety about starting college;
• Become acclimated to collegiate living;
• Learn ways in which to become engaged and involved on campus;
• Become more confident with oneself;
• Gain knowledge about collegiate interests; and
• Meet faculty, staff and/or community members which serve as additional resources to students.

To learn more: https://www.juniata.edu/offices/dean-of-students/inbound/

 


Campus Ministry

Although Juniata is chartered as an independent college, it was founded by members of the Church of the Brethren and continues to value the importance of a spiritual dimension as a part of individual growth. Through the campus ministry office, located in the college’s Unity House, students are encouraged to integrate their faith and vocational direction and offered opportunities to become involved in meaningful religious activities. Campus worship opportunities include weekly Catholic Mass and regular interdenominational services. In addition to worship, there are regular opportunities for students to engage in study of scripture, community service, prayer, observation of Holy days, interfaith dialogue, and informal fellowship. There are also several active religious and faith focused clubs that support the spiritual growth of our students. Juniata’s religious programs are guided by the College Chaplain, campus ministry staff, and a variety of student leaders. The Juniata student body reflects a diversity of religious faiths and the local community provides worship opportunities for Jewish, Protestant, Eastern Orthodox, and Roman Catholic students. The Stone Church of the Brethren, which is adjacent to campus, a prayer labyrinth outside the library, and an interfaith meditation room in the Unity House are available for private meditation and prayer.

Student Activities

Student Government

Elected by students, members of Student Government represent the interests and the concerns of the student body in a variety of ways. Student Government officers serve as student representatives on faculty and trustee committees and serve as the governing body for the 90+ Registered Student Organizations.


Juniata Activities Board (JAB)

JAB plans and executes a broad range of social, cultural, educational, and recreational programs for Juniata College students and the Juniata community. Through various committees, JAB coordinates many of Juniata’s traditions and late night activities. JAB committees typically include:Welcome Week and Finals Blowout, Mountain Day, Tenting and Madrigal, Festifall and Springfest, marketing, and JAB special events.


Registered Student Organizations (RSO)

Juniata College offers students over 90+ Registered Student Organizations (RSO), which represent an array of student interests. Students can sign-up for RSOs at either our Fall involvement fair (Lobsterfest) or learn about upcoming RSO meetings/events through the Daily Announcements. If students would like to contact a specific organization, a current list of active RSOs, officers and advisors is located on the P: Drive, under StudentActivities, “Registered Student Organizations.”


The Juniata College Center for Entrepreneurial Leadership (JCEL)

The Juniata College Center for Entrepreneurial Leadership (JCEL) was developed to integrate entrepreneurial principles and actions into all academic disciplines; touching students and faculty alike. It promotes the “creation of value” in an economic or social sense. JCEL provides experiential learning opportunities to students by providing the tools and resources to act on their product or service idea and create businesses.  

These tools and resources include technical assistance, mentoring, seed capital and space.  Technical assistance & mentoring is provided by faculty, staff and volunteer mentors helping students move through the business planning process to ensure their plan has a reasonable chance to succeed.  JCEL has a Student Seed Capital Fund able to loan or invest up to $ 15,000 in a student business.  

The space we provide is located in the Bob & Eileen Sill Business Incubator (SBI).  SBI has 10,000 square feet of wet lab, professional office and light assembly space for undergraduate entrepreneurs, faculty members and community members. Our Next Step Fellowship Program can provide monetary support to a student who has a business idea they would like to develop. We can pay a student $ 7.25 per hour, in a work study fashion, to research & expound upon their idea. The goal of which is for the student to have developed a full business plan and present it to the JCEL Board for financial support.  

JCEL also offers internships to students from many disciplines/POEs including (but not limited to) entrepreneurship, finance, marketing, management, communications and information technology. Many students have benefited from our large network of contacts and real world tasks & interactions.

 In essence, JCEL offers many tools & resources to help students become successful here at Juniata.  Full program details can be found at https://www.juniata.edu/offices/jcel/

Residence Life

Residence Life

Juniata is a residential campus and, as such, residence hall experiences are designed to complement the formal instructional program. Guidelines for residence hall living are provided in detail through the campus computer network, EagleNet, in the student handbook, The Pathfinder; and in its periodic supplement, The Student Services Newsletter.

With a limited number of exceptions, students are expected to live in college-owned facilities. To secure permission for non-campus housing, arrangements must be made in the prior spring and approval is based on the number of spaces available on campus. Students will not be permitted to move off campus during the academic year. Upper-class residential students choose their rooms on class standing and grade point average (GPA).


Residence Hall Staff

Juniata seeks to provide the best possible living experience in the residence halls. This begins with qualified, caring, and well-trained staff. Staff members in each building are carefully selected, and trained, and are willing to help students have a successful campus living experience. One of the first people students meet on check-in day is the Resident Assistant, better known as the RA. Resident Assistants are assigned to each residence hall floor to help with the adjustment to community life and are instrumental in planning activities to help students become acquainted with their living environment. In addition, RAs are available throughout the year to assist with academic, personal, and community living concerns. Resident Assistants are specially trained upper-class students who are able to answer many questions about Juniata and the residence halls. Resident Assistants report to live-in Residence Directors, known as RDs. Residence Directors are professional staff members who manage each residence hall. They supervise the hall staff, coordinate programs and activities, and work with the student judicial process. Residence Directors can answer many questions about policies and procedures and the campus in general.


Residence Hall Programs

The residential staff offers a wide variety of activities in which students can participate. These programs are planned and organized by students, (RA) Resident Assistants, and the (RD) Resident Directors.  Everyone is encouraged to make their interests known, to become actively involved in planning events, and to participate . The staff assists on the floor to develop programs that enhance a sense of community. These programs generally have a social and/or educational focus.


Living Options

Juniata’s residence halls are smoke-free living environments.

Eco House: The everGREEN Eco House encourages students to develop and promote a sustainable and 'green' lifestyle. Living in this coed house provides an opportunity to live and work with other students who are committed to the campus community's goal of becoming more sustainable.

Global Village: the Global Village is a distinct globally-themed living and learning community designed to provide opportunities for intensive, in-depth cultural interaction and community development. The GV combines language and cultures in a living/learning experience. Residents come home to speak and hear the language of their themed housing. The GV welcomes native speakers; non-native students who have lived, traveled extensively, or studied abroad; and students enrolled in language courses. We currently have Spanish, German, French and Chinese housing along with the Intercultural floor in Terrace Hall.

Co-ed: South Hall is available for upper-class students who choose to live in a community in which men and women live on the same floor. These are gender specific by room.

Female only: Lesher Hall an all-female resident hall. Available to upperclass and freshmen students.

Suites: East Houses apartment style living, housing 8 students. There are 4 bedrooms, a common room and bathroom. Each room is air conditioned.

 

Student Services

Juniata College Health and Wellness Center

Wellness is important at Juniata. Students are encouraged to optimize their physical and emotional health. Although prevention is the primary focus of the Health & Wellness Center, intervention is also provided through the following services:

Medical Services:

The center is staffed by a nurse and administrative assistant Monday thru Friday and visiting physicians on Wednesdays from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m; Friday mornings from 9:00 a.m. to noon and Mondays evenings from 6:00 – 8:00 p.m. Treatment is provided for minor injuries and ailments and routine care of chronic illnesses for full-time students. A health fee is assessed each semester for medical and counseling services. The fee is for services and is not a supplemental form of health insurance. For comprehensive and specialized care, students are referred to the local hospital or to other medical facilities in the area. All full-time Juniata students are required to provide proof of insurance. If proof is not provided, full-time students will be charged a premium and enrolled in a student accident insurance program.

For additional information, please visit the Health and Wellness Center site at https://www.juniata.edu/offices/health/

Counseling Services:

The Health & Wellness Center also provides personal counseling for all students. Each student may receive up to ten sessions of counseling per year free of charge. These services are provided by master’s level therapists who are supervised by the center’s consulting psychiatrist. All services are confidential and are not included on the student record. Counseling services also include assessments, screenings, prevention programming, appropriate referrals, workshops/presentations, support groups, drug and alcohol education programs, and when appropriate, referral to the center’s consulting psychiatrist.


Career Services

The Career Services staff is dedicated to providing students with the fundamental skills and experiential opportunities needed to prepare for the challenges in an ever-changing, global work force.

Career Services provides Juniata students with individual counseling, computerized guidance and information programs (FOCUS II), and workshops on career development and professionalism topics. The office supports a comprehensive website and library of up-to-date career resource materials and graduate/professional school information. Juniata offers a top Career Day, which annually attracts over 100 employers and over 500 students.  Additionally, Juniata students are invited to participate with other Pennsylvania colleges in numerous regional job fairs throughout the year. The largest of these include the Western PA Career Services Association (Pittsburgh area) job fair, the Central PA Employment Consortium (Harrisburg area) job fair, and the Pittsburgh Educational Recruiting Consortium.

Career Services also coordinates Student Internship Programs. Juniata encourages students to seek internship placements generally after completion of the freshman or sophomore years. Students receive assistance in the application process from Career Services and from Juniata faculty. Information regarding credit and non-credit internships is available online and from the Career Services staff in QUEST, located in Founder's Hall.


Co-Curricular Transcript

 

Students are encouraged to utilize a Co-Curricular Transcript (CCT) to document and validate their out-of-class experience. The CCT process enables students to structure their personal development outside the classroom by matching individual needs and goals with available experiences to stimulate growth and learning in specific areas. The CCT documents a student’s leadership and involvement in student programming and provides an opportunity for the student to reflect on his or her development outside the classroom. Information and materials to start a CCT are available in the Career Services Office.

This same document is used to recognize the efforts of those students who perform community service throughout their college career. Students who perform at least 120 hours of non-paid, non-credit volunteer work can receive transcript notation through the Community Services Office.


Dining Services

Baker Refectory, located on the first floor of Ellis Hall, is the main dining hall choice for students on a College meal plan. All residential students are required to select one of the appropriate meal plan options. The dining room is an “all-you-care-to-eat” facility open for breakfast, lunch, and dinner in accordance with the College calendar. Students may select from assorted made-from-scratch entrees, including vegetarian selections at each meal, grill and pizza lines, exhibition cooking station, and more!

Jitters, On the Go! Café, and Beeghly Library 365 Market are available for a cup of coffee or a quick snack between classes.

Monies from a spending account (called DCB) associated with all of the meal plan options may be used by students at any of the above dining facilities. Students are required to bring their ID cards with them to all meals, admittance will not be granted to the Baker Refectory without an ID card.  The DCB balance at the end of the fall semester carries over to the spring semester; the DCB balance associated with meal plans that is not used by the end of the academic year is forfeited.  Additional DCB dollars may be purchased throughout the semester.   

 

 


Mail and Banking Services

The College postal service is located on the ground floor of Ellis Hall. Students receive one assigned post office box for their entire stay at Juniata. A deposit is required in order to receive a mailbox key. Students should use their post office box number as part of their Juniata address. Stamps are available at the post office and parcels can be mailed there during open hours.

An automatic teller machine is available in Ellis Hall.



Public Safety Office

The Public Safety Office is committed to providing a safe and secure environment as essential to the Juniata College community. The Public Safety Office focuses on the protection of college assets, but the primary goal is to assure a safe, secure, and comfortable living environment which promotes learning and personal development. Respect, consideration, and fairness to others are paramount in our daily operations.

For additional information, go here: https://www.juniata.edu/offices/security/


Identification Cards

The College ID card must be presented for admission to meals and to many of the activities at the College, including home athletic events and various college sponsored programs. It also is used for checking out materials at the library. Used primarily for identification, the card should be carried at all times. Identification cards are non-transferable. If lost or stolen, the ID card can be replaced by request at The Public Safety Office. A fee of $20.00 is charged for replacement, $10.00 Fee is charged to replace a damaged ID card, the damaged card must be returned.

Failure to show an ID card in response to a request by a college official will result in a $10.00 fine.

 

 


Vehicle Registration

All students and employees who bring motor vehicles to the college area, whether to the campus itself or not, must register their cars, motorcycles, motor scooters or motor bikes with the Office of Public Safety.  The online vehicle registration form can be accessed by following the link on the home page of the Public Safety’s website.  Upon approval of the registration form, a display sticker is issued and should be placed on the left side of the rear bumper. Failure to register a vehicle by a student results in a fine.  The registration decal is valid for the entire academic year and is non-transferable.

For additional information, go here: https://www.juniata.edu/offices/security/policies/parking-traffic-regulations.php

Fees for Vehicle Registration

The vehicle registration fee is: $75.00 
The vehicle registration is billed to the students tuition account, during the processing procedure.

 


Parking

A valid vehicle registration permit properly displayed entitles a student to park in student parking areas only; parking in unauthorized areas subjects students to a fine.

 


Traffic Regulations

In addition to the rules and regulations for operating a motor vehicle in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, there are several regulations peculiar to the Juniata campus:

  1. Pedestrians shall at all times have the right of way.
  2. All Vehicles shall operate at a safe speeds
  3. All vehicles  shall comply with all traffic devices, stop signs, etc.
  4. No vehicles, including two wheel motorized vehicles shall be operated or travel over,      or park on, any grass area, concrete walkway,
  5. Failure to comply with this regulation will result in a fine and may include loss of      on- campus driving privileges.
  6. Improper operation of any motor vehicle within the College jurisdiction will result      in a citation or revoking of motor vehicle privileges on campus

 

 


Firearms and related items

Illegal and/or dangerous weapons, including but not limited to BB / pellet guns, sling shots, and pneumatic weapons that resemble a real firearm, are not permitted on campus. Violators will be subject to disciplinary action and arrested if appropriate. Legal and approved firearms used for sport, target shooting, or hunting, ammunition , archery equipment, knives and other edged - weapons with blades exceeding three inches, and/or devices that can be considered a danger to the campus community must be registered and stored in the Public Safety Office. Firearms that are being stored at the Raystown Field Station must be registered with college staff designee and kept in the gun safe on site.

Handguns and assault weapon platforms are prohibited from being registered.

Students must complete an application/registration for each firearm.

All firearms being transported to or from campus must be secured and placed within an approved firearms carrying case.

Registered firearms and/or dangerous weapons are not permitted In administrative/ academic buildings or college residence halls. Failure to comply with this regulation may result in expulsion from the college and/ or arrest.

Public Safety or college staff designee reserves the right to not sign out a firearm to a student If he/she appears to be in an altered mental state, under the Influence, or the request is not consistent with traditional hunting times.

With proper identification and registration card, students may sign-out their registered items by contacting the Public Safety Office or college staff designee.

 

 

Standards of Student Conduct

Alcohol

The College maintains that the use of alcohol and other drugs is not necessary for the success of social occasions.

Although students are considered adults for most phases of community life, Pennsyl­vania State Law prohibits the purchase, possession, or consumption of alcoholic beverages by persons under 21 years of age. Persons who furnish alcoholic beverages to those under 21 are subject to civil liability and criminal prosecution. Local ordinances and state laws also prohibit open containers of alcoholic beverages in public areas and in vehicles. College policy permits only students 21 years of age and older to possess or consume alcoholic beverages on campus.


Drugs

Juniata considers the possession and/or use of illegal or dangerous drugs a serious violation of College policy. Disciplinary action for involvement could lead to separation from the College. The College will assist the efforts of law enforcement officials who are investigating the involvement of persons with illegal or dangerous drugs.

Since the use of drugs, including alcohol, may be associated with medical and psychological problems, students may be referred, or refer themselves, to the counseling and medical resources of the College and/or the local community.


Sexual Harassment

It is Juniata policy to promote and maintain a campus environment free of all forms of discrimination, intimidation, and exploitation, including sexual harassment. The use of one’s institutional position or authority to seek or solicit unwanted sexual relations with a member of the Juniata community is incompatible with the mutual trust and respect among members of the College community fundamental to the mission of Juniata. If a student has a supervisor, teacher or coach who has used his or her position to seek or solicit unwanted sexual relations, that student should report the matter to the Director of Human Resources (employment-related problem), the Provost (professor-student incidents), or the Dean of Students (student-student incidents). A copy of the sexual harassment policy is distributed to all students under separate cover. Additional copies are available from residence hall staff, the Dean of Student Office, and the Human Resources Office.


Admission

Philosophy

The Admission Committee encourages students to apply to Juniata if they demonstrate the proper desire, motivation, and maturity needed to benefit from a four-year private college experience. Such qualities are evaluated through the application requirements listed below. The Admission Committee places the most emphasis on a student's high school transcript. In addition, standardized tests, activities, community involvement and all the things that make up the student's life are important in the review. Juniata seeks a broad student population base that includes a wide geographic and cultural representation from a variety of social and economic backgrounds.

The College reserves the right to determine which applicants will be admitted. The selection of candidates is made without regard to race, sex, religion, creed, national origin, and or handicap.

Guidelines for Entering Freshmen

Application and Information

Students may apply to Juniata using the Common Application any time after completion of their junior year in secondary school. The Common Application begins accepting applications August 1 of the senior year. A complete secondary school transcript indicating courses and grades (including senior year courses and grades to date) must be sent from the applicant's guidance office along with SAT-I and/or ACT scores, an essay, and a letter of recommendation.

Candidates for freshman admission can choose from three application options - Early Decision I, Early Decision II, and Regular Decision:

Note:  Students who wish to be considered for all additional competitive scholarships should have their application submitted no later than January 1. Most merit scholarships are not determined based on date of submission, and admission preference is not given to those who apply earlier in the application period.

* - Please call the Enrollment Center (814-641-3420) to inquire whether applications are still being accepted beyond any application deadline.


Contents of Application

An application for admission consists of the components listed below. Credentials that are reviewed include: high school academic record, SAT or ACT test results, completed application form including evidence of extracurricular involvement, recommendation letter(s), and a personal essay.

High School Transcript A secondary school program including at least 16 college preparatory courses from an approved public, private, or parochial school must be completed or anticipated. These courses must include a minimum of four years of academic English, two years of a foreign language, and a combination of mathematics, laboratory science courses, social sciences and humanities.

A complete secondary school transcript must be sent from the applicant’s guidance office, noting all courses taken and grades received from the freshman year through the junior year. A listing of courses to be taken in the senior year should accompany this transcript and grades from the first marking period and/or the first semester should be sent when they become available. Upon graduation, students must submit a final secondary school transcript noting graduation date and guidance counselor signature or raised seal.

Standardized Test Results Results of the Scholastic Assessment Tests (SAT-I) taken in the junior and/or senior year are required unless the student chooses to participate in Juniata's Optional Standardized Test Program. The American College Test (ACT), taken in either the junior or senior year, may be substituted for the SAT-I. Applicants whose native language is not English also must provide results of a Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or scores from an approved English language program. International applicants who have studied wholly in an English speaking high school are required to submit an SAT/ACT score. All other international students are not required to submit SAT or ACT scores but should still submit TOEFL (or similar) results. SAT-II: Subject Tests are not required but may be submitted for admission consideration.   Contact the Admissions Office for more information.

Application Form Juniata uses the "Common Application" and the “Coalition Application”. Application forms may be submitted at www.commonapp.org and http://www.coalitionforcollegeaccess.org/. Only one application is required. The application requires a listing of extracurricular activities in both school and community, guidance counselor or teacher letter(s) of recommendation, and an essay which answers one of the essay questions listed in the application for admission. The applicant should complete the form and submit it online.


Campus Visits

Although not generally required for admission, the College strongly recommends that each prospective student make a visit to campus. A campus visit serves as an opportunity to learn more about the College, its students, and faculty, and is a great way for the admission team to meet interested students. During the academic year, the enrollment center has a variety of visit options. Students are encouraged to visit https://www.juniata.edu/admission/campus-visit/ to select the appropriate visit program to serve their information needs. In general the Enrollment Center is open 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Mondays through Fridays from September through April,  and for selected Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 1PM.  Appointments for the summer months can be scheduled for 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. weekdays.  Please contact the Office of Admission at 814-641-3428 for more information or to schedule an appointment.


Guidelines for Transfer Students

Applicants are considered transfer students if they have graduated from an approved secondary school program and completed the equivalent of one full-time semester of coursework at a regionally accredited community college, junior college, or four-year institution. Student's work will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. Notification of a transfer admission decision is given within one month upon receipt of all credentials.

Application deadlines for transfer students are July 1 for fall semester entry and December 1 for spring semester entry, though earlier submission is highly encouraged.

First semester freshmen who transfer a semester worth of transfer credits may have to take CWS (College Writing Seminar) even if they have taken English credits.  All students must complete the CWS intake essay, and will be evaluated on a case by case basis regarding whether or not they will be required to take CWS.


Contents of Transfer Application

An application for transfer admission consists of the following components:

Application  Juniata uses the "Common Application" Transfer Application. Forms may be obtained at www.commonapp.org. The application requires transfer statement which explains why the student wishes to transfer. The applicant should complete the application and submit online.

High School Transcripts The Office of Admission requires an official, final high school transcript indicating final grades, class rank (if applicable) and date of graduation. The transcript should be sent directly from the school to the Juniata admission office.  Students with more than 24 credits are not required to send their high school transcripts.

Standardized Test Scores SAT and or ACT scores should also be submitted. Scores can either be sent directly from the testing agency, or may be indicated on the official high school transcript. Juniata 's code number for the SAT is 2341, and for the ACT 3600. SAT/ACT results are often waived for qualified transfer students whose previous institution did not require scores for admission.

College Transcripts Transfer applicants must also submit an official transcript from each college previously attended and a college catalog or course descriptions of classes taken at previous institutions. The transcript must be sent directly to Juniata from the former institution(s). Catalogs and course descriptions are used to evaluate transfer credit.

Transfer College Report Form The Transfer College Report Form is a required document before your matriculation to Juniata College. It must be completed by a college official who has access to your academic and disciplinary records.  The form can also be found at https://www.juniata.edu/admission/student-info/transferring-credits.php


Financial Aid

All transfer students offered admission are eligible to apply for financial aid. The application procedure is the same as that for new freshman students and is found under the section “Student Finances.’’ For further information, contact: Molly Thompson, Transfer Coordinator, thompsm@juniata.edu, 814-641-3425.


Transfer Credit

Juniata does not accept in transfer any coursework below a grade of "C-" nor coursework of a strictly technical or remedial nature, nor physical education coursework. Credit is normally only awarded for courses taken at an accredited institution. Special circumstances may affect the transferability of an individual student record. These cases will be handled on an individual basis and decisions will be based on Juniata's academic policy. An official credit evaluation will be completed by the Office of the Registrar after a student has been admitted to Juniata.

Students will have their work evaluated on a course-by-course basis. Courses equivalent to Juniata's curriculum course description will be granted direct course equivalence. Coursework accepted in transfer may be used to meet both liberal arts graduation requirements and Program of Emphasis requirements.

While Juniata will accept credit from any regionally accredited college or university, the college has formal transfer agreements with Harrisburg Area Community College and Penn Highlands Community College. Articulation agreements are in place to facilitate the transfer of credit from one institution to another. Contact the Transfer Coordinator at either institution for more information.

Other Admissions Programs

Supported Admission

Students who are offered Supported Admission are admitted to Juniata with the belief that they have the potential to succeed in college, but would benefit from extra mentoring and assistance from QUEST staff.

During the fall semester, all freshmen enroll in the required four-credit foundation course - College Writing Seminar - designated to provide first year students with reading, writing, computer, library, time management, and study skills necessary for success in college.  For a Supported Admission student, a specially designated Freshman Advisor is the student's CWS instructor or a professor during the first semester.  Freshmen Advisors work closely with students to monitor their academic performance and address individual needs.

The program for Supported Admission students includes regularly scheduled, required appointments with an academic counselor (at least five such meetings) throughout the fall semester to monitor and assess progress in each class, discuss issues related to transitioning into college, discuss how to prepare for and take tests, give pre-registration advice, assist with selection of a second adviser, and review many other topics appropriate to the individual circumstances of each student.

Supported Admission students also benefit from resources offered through or coordinated by QUEST.  These include use of the Writing Center, how to best utilize the faculty and advisors, determining when referral to the counseling center is appropriate, how to build an academic schedule and design a Program of Emphasis, how to go about exploring possible careers, etc. There is a broad network of support and advisors available to all students.

While receiving the additional support described herein, Supported Admission students carry a typical course load of 12-16 credits during the first semester and are in no way distinguishable from their peers in the classroom. Upon completion of one semester in good academic standing, the student is no longer required to have regular appointments with QUEST staff, but is able to utilize the office's continued advocacy and resources.


Deferred Admission

Deferred Admission is designed for students who wish to begin their college studies at a time other than the fall semester after graduation from secondary school. Application procedures and requirements are the same as for all other applicants. Candidates should note their interest to be considered under the Deferred Admission Program by contacting the admission office. Students may defer admission for up to one year.


Spring Semester Admission

Application procedures and requirements are the same as fall admission. The Spring semester application deadline is December 1, though earlier submission is encouraged. Interested persons may contact the Enrollment Center for further information.


Early Admission

Juniata encourages applications from students who demonstrates the aptitude, desire and maturity to begin college level work prior to the completion of his/her secondary school program. Students may consider enrolling at Juniata the last year or the last semester of their senior year. A formal application for admission must be completed. In addition students must: 1) Have an admission interview on campus; 2) Provide a written recommendation from their guidance counselor supporting their application for early admission and indicating they will receive a diploma either at the end of their junior year or after they have successfully completed one year of college level work, which includes college level English; and 3) Provide a written statement from their parents indicating approval of early admission. Applicants are expected to meet all other admission requirements.


Home-Schooled Students

Juniata welcomes applications from students who are home-schooled and have been approved by their local school district. Students must submit an application for admission and include standardized test results, an application essay, letter(s) of recommendation and portfolio of academic work. Students are also encouraged to interview and submit additional information to support their application. Please contact the Juniata Home School Coordinator in the Enrollment Center for further information.


International Students

International students are strongly encouraged to submit applications. The procedures for admission are the same as for other freshman or transfer applicants,  In addition, for applicants whose native language is not English, a TOEFL score of 80 Internet-based (or equivalent IELTS or Pearson PTE Academic) or higher is required for unconditional admission to Juniata.

Minumum section scores are also required. (https://www.juniata.edu/academics/departments/international/english-for-academic-purposes/courses.php)

All students who submit a TOEFL score, however may still be tested upon arrival to ensure appropriate course placement, including ESL courses. If you have submitted a score lower than 80 iBT/550 PBT, or you test below that level on arrival, your status will be English-Conditional.  Students who have studied in the US or have been taught in a curriculum where the language of instruction is English may be eligible for a TOEFL waiver.  Please contact the Admission office for details. 

A complete set of original or notarized educational credentials with certified English translations is also necessary for international applicants and is required before eligibility for admission can be determined. In addition, an affidavit of financial responsibility is required (by U.S. law) before an I-20 form (necessary for procuring a student visa from a U.S. Embassy or Consulate) can be issued.

Further information regarding international applications is available from:

Director of International Admission
Enrollment Center
Juniata College
Huntingdon, PA 16652-2196 USA

FAX: (814) 641-3100 E-mail: usastudy@juniata.edu

 


English-Conditional Admission

International applicants with TOEFL test scores of 52 - 79 Internet-Based (iBT)*/470 – 549 Paper-Based (PBT)* may, if otherwise qualified academically, be granted English-Conditional (EC) Admission, provided they complete the appropriate English as a Second Language (ESL) coursework in Juniata's English for Academic Purposes (EAP).

The IEP follows all Juniata policies regarding advancement in its courses. Students may earn up to 15 credits in their ESL courses toward graduation requirements. While taking ESL courses the IEP faculty evaluates the students' English proficiency and they may enroll in academic coursework outside the IEP when appropriate.

*Equivalent IELTS and Pearson PTE scores are also accepted.


International Baccalaureate

International Baccalaureate Diploma recipients are granted credit for one full year (30 credits) toward a degree at Juniata. Students who have an IB Diploma normally enter the College with sophomore standing. IB certificate recipients receive course credit for each higher level examination passed with a score of 5 or higher. To receive this credit the student will meet with the appropriate department chair or designee to consider the advantage or disadvantage of accepting credit. IB credits may be counted toward degree requirements.


Non-Degree Students

Any person who wants to take coursework at Juniata as a non-degree student need not apply for admission consideration, but must provide proof of academic ability. The Registrar enrolls and registers all non-degree candidates.

Non-degree students are required to fill out the registration form located at our Registrar's Office website under Class Schedules: http://services2.juniata.edu/registrar/jcsa/index.php Cost of course credit will be the tuition charge of part-time tuition.

Non-Traditional Student Admission Programs

Returning Adult Students

Qualified students who have been away from the classroom are welcome to attend Juniata. Courses are offered for both degree and non-degree seeking students and may be taken on either a full-time or part-time basis. Students are enrolled in regular Juniata classes; there are currently no evening, weekend, or accelerated programs for returning adult students.  Students must meet admission criteria. Degree-seeking students may apply either as transfer or freshman students. Consult the Enrollment Center for further details.


Education Certification Program

Students with a B.A. or B.S. from an accredited four-year American college or university and who meet Education Department criteria may take courses at Juniata to receive their education certification. Students may take courses on a full-time or part-time basis. A minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA in the student's previous coursework is required. Consult the Enrollment Center or Education Department for further details.


Second Baccalaureate Degree Program

Students who have earned a bachelor's degree at an accredited, domestic American university or college and desire a second bachelor's degree reflecting in-depth study in a discipline other than that of their first degree may enroll upon completion of application requirements. Courses from a previous degree will be evaluated on a course by course basis and may be used to fulfill graduation requirements. Students must meet all Juniata graduation requirements, fulfill the department requirements within the new discipline, and observe the College residency requirement. International students who desire a second degree will be evaluated individually for their candidacy. For further information, contact the Enrollment Center.


Senior Citizens Program

Citizens who are 60 years of age or older may take courses on a part-time basis.


High School Student Program

Juniata continues to support what was previously known as Dual Enrollment for high school students in our non-degree visiting student program for Huntingdon County and the surrounding area. In the interest of promoting a positive post secondary experience, eligible high school juniors and seniors may take one course per semester (maximum of 4) with approval from their high school guidance counselors or instructional supervisor.  Student eligibility and readiness for college-level course work is determined by the high school guidance counselor or instructional supervisor.

Course availability and registration is based on open seats and prerequisite and co-requisite requirements.  All College policies regarding registration, tuition and fees are applied.  Tuition does not include fees for labs, field trips, supplies, books or other incidentals.  High school students are not permitted to register for College Writing Seminar (CWS), Internship, Credit by Exam, or Independent Study.  Registration is facilitated by submitting the Visiting Student Registration form to the high school guidance counselor, or the student's instructional supervisor, who will forward the approved registration form to the Registrar's Office at Juniata College.  Tuition for the High School Student Program is $100 per credit.  Tuition statements are sent directly to the student, not the high school.  Students who are eligible for free or reduced lunch at their high school are eligible for free tuition in the High School Student Program.

Master's Programs at Juniata

Certificate Programs

The Genomics Leadership Initiative at Juniata College

The Genomics Leadership Initiative at Juniata College has been funded by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and National Science Foundation. The initiative seeks to achieve its goal by developing a genomics certificate program, a leadership module, and student summer research experiences.

GENOMICS CERTIFICATE PROGRAM:

Comprised of seven courses, the genomics certificate addresses both the science and the broader ethical, legal and social implications (ELSI) surrounding progress and discoveries in the field of genomics. The ethical, legal and social issues surrounding advances in genomics provides a strong focus for practicing a breadth of knowledge and skills; the understanding of the scientific foundation of genomics provides the focus for developing an interdisciplinary base and cross disciplinary understanding of the life sciences in an era of “big data”. To help support this part of the program the grant has also funded an ELSI faculty development workshop, a seminar series, stipends for faculty developing new or revised classes, and stipends for faculty to formally assess the learning gains of students as a result of programmatic activities.

What is a certificate?

In general, an undergraduate certificate provides an interdisciplinary curriculum that is not available within any single academic unit. A certificate offers the possibility of a more cohesive general education experience oriented around a theme and taught by faculty who work together as a group on an ongoing basis and have common inter-departmental learning objectives and assessments. The awarding of the certificate is noted on the student’s transcript.

Who is this certificate for?

Students intending to pursue careers in biological research and medicine are the primary target. However, students interested in careers in public policy, public health, law, and business will gain by developing similar competencies.

Why should a student get this certificate?

As cost of a human genome approaches $1000, appreciation of both the science and the ethical, legal, and societal implications of genomics has become an increasingly pressing issue. Design of the certificate was based on recommendations from a joint document between the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) and the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) entitled, “Scientific Foundations for Future Physicians.” This report emphasized the importance of integrative scientific approaches, scientific reasoning, intellectual curiosity, communication and decision making skills, adaptability, ethical principles, and understanding of patients as individuals and in a social context. HHMI has funded Juniata College to implement this certificate program.

Description and Goals of a Certificate in Genomics, Ethics, and Society

Comprised of seven courses, the certificate addresses both the science and the broader ethical, legal and social implications (ELSI) surrounding progress and discoveries in the field of genomics. No area of modern biology provides a more appropriate focus for combining the humanities and sciences than the ethical, legal, and social implications (ELSI) of the human genome project and the evolution of the field of personalized medicine. The subject cannot be completely addressed without the input of specialists working across disciplinary boundaries. The ethical, legal and social issues surrounding advances in genomics provide a strong focus for practicing a breadth of knowledge and skills while understanding the acts of judgment and social contexts involved in the development and application of scientific knowledge; the understanding of the scientific foundation of genomics provides the focus for developing an interdisciplinary base and cross disciplinary understanding of the life sciences in an era of “big data”.

Learning objectives

Students who attain genomics certification will be able to:

Describe the basic concepts and principles of genomics.
Explain the scope of genomics from genes to society.
Integrate knowledge of the chemical, physical, mathematical and computational bases of genomics.
Explain the importance of the place of genomics in the human effort to understand natural phenomena, including its history and social impact.
Be able to make and justify ethical judgments about genomics research and its uses in medical practice and elsewhere.
Use the skills and interdisciplinary perspectives of the liberal arts in understanding trends in genomics and communicating them to academic peers and others.
Apply the process of science to questions in genomics.
Demonstrate an in-depth knowledge of a selected field in genomics.
Progress into a leadership role, working with experts and non-experts, with an awareness of the likely results of one's actions and an understanding of how results might differ in different settings and different cultures.

REQUIREMENTS

Core Courses: All students pursuing a genomics certificate must take four core courses required for a genomics certificate. Download the Genome Certificate Sheet to organize and plan your course of study.

  1. Genomics, Ethics and Society (IC 203; Fall; MW 2-3:50PM; CWS prereq) A team-taught course that lays the foundations for interdisciplinary work on the ethical and social dimensions of genomics.
  2. A course covering basic molecular biology, genetics, and genomics:

Biology II BI 106; Fall; N division class; T/Th 9 to 10:20AM, or T/Th 1 to 2:20PM, Discussion Sections Weds 8 or 10AM; BI-105 CH-105 prereqs
Human Biology BI 109; Not for biology majors; Fall; N division class; MWF 9 to 9:55PM

  1. At least three credits of statistics:

Biostatistics with lab BI 305, Fall; N and QS division class; T/TH 10:30 to 11:50AM; Lab M 1 to 2:55PM or 3 to 4:55; BI105 or ESS100 prereq
Environmetrics ESS 230; Spring N division and QS class; T/Th 10:30 to 11:55AM; Sophomore standing
Introductory Probability and Statistics MA 220, Fall MWF 10 to 10:55AM; Discussion T noon; Spring MWF 1 to 1:55PM, TH 2:30 to 3:25PM; QS and N division class, prereq MA130.

  1. One course covering informatics and analysis of large data sets:

Information Discovery IM 241, Fall QS and S division class; T/TH 9 to 10:20AM; prereqs IT110 or IT111 or CS110 or Instructors Permission (Loren Rhodes)
Biological Sciences Research Methods (Lamendella, Buonaccorsi, and Keeney sections)
Even Spring Semesters (Buonaccorsi), N division class; MW 2 to 4:50PM; prereqs BI207 or Instructors Permission
Odd Fall Semesters (Lamendella), N division class; schedule TBA; prereqs BI207 or Instructors Permission
Even Fall Semesters (Keeney), N division class; schedule TBA; prereqs BI207 or Instructors Permission
Computer Science 110 section G only, Spring N class, MWF 8AM to 8:55AM
Unix CS 255U, 1 credit every semester, T 8AM, prereq Computer Science 110 or Instructors Permission (Loren Rhodes);

AND

Perl CS255P, 2 credits, Summer, prereq Computer Science 110 or Instructors Permission (Loren Rhodes), sophomore standing, self study

or

Python CS255Y, 2 credits, Summer, prereq Computer Science 110 or Instructors Permission (Loren Rhodes), sophomore standing, self study

Electives: In addition to the core courses, students must take at least three elective courses related to ELSI genomic themes:

Social History of Medicine History HS 211; Every Fall; May count as a either a CA, or an H or I division class. T/TH 1 to 2:20PM
Medieval Medicine: Health and Disease in the Middle Ages History HS 399, Every Spring. H division class. MW 11AM to 12:20PM
Doctors, Medicine and Literature Russian RU 299 01, Fall of odd numbered years. May count as a either a CA, or an H or I division class. T/TH 10:30 to 11:50PM, T Noon to 12:55pm.
Science and Human Values Philosophy PL 250, Spring of odd numbered years, H division class.
Moral Judgment Psychology 3XX, Every Summer online, S division class.
Leadership in the 21rst Century. Business EB 299, Odd Springs online (3 cr), S division class

AND Executive Leadership Business 199, 1 cr, Spring, 3PM, Weds.


Certificate in Geographical Information Systems

Geographic Information System (GIS) and spatial reasoning are a mainstay knowledge base for working professionals in environmental science, resource management, local and regional planning, disease monitoring and evaluation, real estate, military planning, and social science research. The Juniata GIS certificate program is offered jointly by the Environmental Science and Studies and the Computer Science and Information Technology Departments. We have two tracks to prepare a student for a career in any of the GIS fields. The first track has a focus on Environmental Science. This track has more courses in field methods in GIS and spatial analysis. The second track has a focus on Information Technology. This track has more courses in programming and data mining. the certificate is open to students in all departments as well as Juniata alumni.

Requirements for GIS (18-21 credits):

We have designed this certificate based on looking at successful programs. We have tried to match core strengths of other successful programs while differentiating ourselves based on our key strengths. The cores courses include

The ways we differentiate ourselves is through our strength in field data collection techniques for environmental sciences. We include tracks in Environmental Science and in Information Technology

The requirements of the certification are as follows:

Quantitative field intro (1 course) (4 credits): This section requires the student to have a quantitative introductory class in their field. The requirement of this course is that it has a lab or quantitative section where Excel or other spreadsheet or database program is used to compile and represent or analyze data. One course from the following:

Core Statistics or data analysis (1 course) (3-4 credits): One course from this section must be taken:

Core Geographic Information Courses (3 courses)(8 credits)

Field data collection component (1 course) (3-4 credits): This section is intended to have students exposed to the vagaries of field data collection. It is preferred that students collect spatially explicit data using GPS technologies or other spatially explicit survey methods. Database manage or other courses that explore the process of data collection will also meet this requirement.

Capstone or project requirement (1-4):

Table of Requirements

Environmental track

Information Technology Track

Requirement

Credits

ESS 100

IT 111/ CS110

Base Course

3-4

ESS 230 Environmetrics

Or

BI 305 BioStat

IM 241:  Information Discovery

Data Analysis and Discovery

3-4

ESS 330: Introduction to Geographic Information Systems 

ESS 330: Introduction to Geographic Information Systems 

Basic GIS

4

ESS 337 Advanced Topics in GIS and Remote Sensing

ESS 337 Advanced Topics in GIS and Remote Sensing

Remote Sensing and Modeling

3

One from

ESS 399 Ecology of Fishes: (3)

ESS 399 Forestry

ESS 399 Hydrology at RFS: (3)

ESS 399 Wildlife Techniques (3)

BIO 399 Field and Stream: (4)

ESS 350 Field Research Methods—(4)

GL 240 Geological Field Methods. I  (4)

CS 370 Database Management

Data Collection

3-4

Senior Capstone or Other GIS project

I4I or other project with Spatial Data

Capstone

1-4

Total Credits

 

 

18-21

Contacts:

Neil Pelkey, PhD.: Associate Professor Environmental Science and Studies and IT
Email: pelkey@juniata.edu or (814) 641-3589

Dennis Johnson, PhD.: Professor and Chair Environmental Science
Email: johnson@juniata.edu or (814) 641- 5335

Loren Rhodes, PhD.: Professor and Chair, Computer Science and Information Technology
Email: rhodes@juniata.edu or (814) 641-3620


Student Finances

Student Financial Planning

Juniata College offers a wide array of student financial planning services, ranging from deferred payment plans to scholarship programs. The Office of Student Financial Planning provides substantial, diverse funding and planning opportunities for all families regardless of means.

Families may have unique circumstances that affect their ability to meet college expenses. While some families may have little interest in traditional forms of financial assistance, others require support from the many resources available from federal, state, and institutional programs. Student Financial Planning staff members are available to help identify sources of financial support, and to discuss funding resources and opportunities.


Sources of Aid

Generally, the resources available to provide assistance fall into three broad categories: scholarship and grant, loans, and work.


Scholarships and Grant

Scholarships and grants are commonly termed "gift" assistance and need not be repaid (unless so stipulated as a condition of the award).

Grants

Grants are usually provided to meet a student's financial need as established through the submission of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Please review the section titled, "APPLYING FOR FINANCIAL AID" for further information.

Scholarships

Scholarships are generally awarded in recognition of academic achievement, talent, or some other characteristic. Financial need may not necessarily be a selection requirement.

Competitive Scholarship programs:

Juniata offers an array of competitive scholarships that recognize the outstanding achievements of incoming students without regard to financial need. Academic Scholarships at Juniata reward students who do well academically, but also contribute to their school and community by getting involved. For most scholarships at Juniata, all you have to do is apply to be considered!

The list of possible academic scholarships is listed below:

Other academic scholarships that are not awarded every year include the W. Clay and Kathryn H. Burkholder ScholarshipRonald L. Cherry ScholarshipRichard M. Simpson Scholarship and Larry Johnson Scholarship.

Juniata College also offers Heritage and Ray Day Scholarships to students who show commitment to academic excellence, leadership and community service that culminate in a level of understanding among diverse groups.

"External" Scholarships

Many students receive scholarships that are awarded by agencies other than Juniata (Lion's Club, PTA, Rotary, etc.). Students are encouraged to explore these opportunities that often reduce the family's cost of education.


Loans

Loans permit students and parents to defer a portion of the cost of education over an extended period of time.  The federal government, the College, and private agencies offer programs that seek to provide educational financing at reasonable rates.  Further information is available from the Office of Student Financial Planning.


Student Employment

Juniata provides both on and off-campus student employment opportunities to help defray educationally related expenses.  While the College cannot guarantee that every eligible student will secure employment, there has been an even balance between available positions and students interested in work.  Further information about available positions may be found on the Arch.

Community Work Study

The Community Work Study Program places Federal Work Study-eligible students at community agencies across Huntingdon County for part-time employment in service to the community. Students earn minimum wage while aiding organizations, become more efficient with program/event planning and reach out into the community. Tutoring programs such as the Huntingdon Community Center After-School Program, the Salvation Army ARC of Learning Program and the Bethel AME After-School program work with Huntingdon Co. youth and provide tutoring for K-12. There are also positions available with other agencies. Information, position descriptions, and applications will be available in the Office of Service Learning.


Eligibility for Financial Aid

Students must meet the following conditions to be considered eligible for most aid programs.

Enrollment Status

Normally students must be enrolled in a degree or certification program to be considered eligible for most College aid. (Exception: Half-Tuition Programs)

Semester Course Load

Most institutional aid requires the student enroll for twelve or more credits per semester.  Students who enroll for half-time (six or more) credits may receive federal and state resources.

Citizenship

Many aid programs require that recipients be citizens, permanent residents, or certain stipulated refugee statuses.  Exceptions include several institutional aid programs and student employment.

Off-Campus/ Study Away

Generally, students who participate in College affiliated programs (including internships, student teaching, and study abroad) are fully eligible for most forms of assistance.  Participating students apply for aid in the usual manner.

Maximum Value for Institutional Scholarships, Grants, and Benefits

It is College policy that any combination of institutional aid cannot exceed the value of tuition, except in several unique scholarship categories.

Juniata's Conditional Guarantee

A student's commitment to attend Juniata is matched by a corresponding commitment from the College. The Conditional Guarantee assures you that College-sponsored aid will remain unchanged for the student's four year of attendance.*  Because of this you can plan and budget for each year with the expectation that College aid will not be reduced.

The following conditions must be met to maintain the provisions of the Conditional Guarantee:


Cost of Education Budget

Resident Students and Those Living in Off-Campus College Housing (2018/19)

Tuition $ 44,772
Room-Double $   6,666
Room-Single $   8,334
Board $   5,856
Mandatory Fees $      824
Books & Supplies $   1,000
Personal Expenses $   1,000
Transportation Expenses $ 250-900 (*varies by state)
Total (used to determine aid) $ 60,368
Total Direct Costs (paid to JC) $ 58,118

* Students from states other than Pennsylvania or Maryland will have their travel budgets increased in recognition of the additional transportation costs borne by students whose residence is geographically distant from Juniata.  Contact the Office of Student Financial Planning for more information.

Commuting Students

Tuition $ 44,772
Mandatory Fees $      604
Books & Supplies $   1,000
Personal Expenses $   2,650
Transportation Expenses $      600
Total (used to determine aid) $ 49,626
Total Direct Costs (paid to JC) $ 45,376

Applying for Financial Aid

Requirements and Timing

New students (freshmen and transfers) must be admitted to the College before financial aid can be awarded. New students should file applications for assistance by March 1 to ensure they are considered for all available funding. Non-degree students pursuing teacher certification should contact the Office of Student Financial Planning for additional information.

Continuing need-based aid recipients must reapply each year by April 1. Students who fail to meet the deadline date cannot be guaranteed that their funding will remain at levels consistent with the previous years. The FAFSA is required.


Applications

Students and their families may have to complete several applications to receive consideration for various financial aid programs. Forms generally fall into two categories: applications used to determine eligibility for need-based aid and loan applications.


Applications Which Determine Financial Need

Juniata College uses two forms to determine eligibility for assistance: The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), and the Institutional Data Form. Families should carefully review the following information to decide which application(s) should be filed.

 

New Freshman (Never Attended Post-Secondary Schools)

The FAFSA must be submitted no later than Feb 15th.  Electronic applications must be filed through the www.fafsa.gov website.  Families are strongly encouraged to secure a FSA User ID (username & password) to serve as your login to various U.S. Department of Education Systems, including the FAFSA.  Your FSA ID confirms your identity when you access your financial aid information and electronically sign Federal Student Aid documents.  You should never share your FSA ID with anyone.  The FSA User ID can be created by going to https://fsaid.ed.gov.

Each student needs a FSA ID. For dependent students, the parent providing the income information on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) will also need to register for a FSA ID.

New Transfer Students or Freshmen with Other Post-Secondary Attendance

The FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid).

Returning Juniata Students

Renewal reminders for the FAFSA will be sent to each student's email address beginning in December. 


Loan Applications

Students are required to complete the Master Promissory Note (MPN) as the chief application for a Federal Direct Loan.  The MPN will be completed only once for the student's entire borrowing history. (In subsequent years the financial aid award letter from the College will serve as the document used to preserve or adjust the loan value). Parents interested in borrowing the Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (PLUS) follow similar procedures. 


Financial Aid Standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress

All students (including international students) enrolled at Juniata College are subject to the academic standards of the College, which are printed in the College catalog. In addition, students receiving financial aid, in order to continue to receive financial aid, must meet other requirements as described in detail in this statement of Satisfactory Academic Progress.

The Higher Education Act of 1965 (HEA), as amended, mandates institutions of higher education to establish minimum standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) for students receiving financial aid. Program Integrity Regulations, modifying these requirements, were issued October 29, 2010, with an effective date of July 1, 2011. In order to comply with these requirements, Juniata College has established the following definition or standard of Satisfactory Academic Progress for undergraduate students.

The federal programs governed by this regulation include Federal Pell Grant, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant, Federal Work Study, Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Direct Student Loans and Federal Direct PLUS loans. Specific guidelines for other financial aid programs, including Juniata funded awards are noted throughout the policy and summarized at the end of the document*.

To be considered as maintaining Satisfactory Academic Progress, both full-time and less than full-time students must meet the following standards:

Requirements

Pace

Students must successfully complete an average of 67% of their cumulative, attempted credit hours as transcripted by the Registrar’s Office.

Qualitative Measure

All students must maintain a cumulative grade point average corresponding with the table below, as transcripted by the Registrar’s Office.

Credits Attempted (Including Transfer Credits) Minimum Cumulative Grade Point Average


0-35.99 1.66
36-61.99 1.80
62-89.99 1.95
90 or more 2.00

Grade Level Progression

In order to advance to the next academic grade level for financial aid purposes, the following credit hours must be completed:

To advance to: You must complete:
Grade Level 2 — 24 credit hours
Grade Level 3 — 54 credit hours
Grade Level 4 — 87 credit hours

Special Notes

Generally, it takes 120 credit hours to obtain a Bachelor’s Degree. To graduate in four years, a student must enroll for, and earn, an average of 15 credit hours per semester. Earning only 12 credit hours per semester (minimum for full-time) would extend graduation beyond the four year standard. Therefore, students who receive Juniata sponsored Merit scholarships and need-based grants should average at least 12 credits per semester. Also, certain financial aid resources, such as the Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance Agency and other state grants, require a minimum of 12 credits earned per semester and are only available for 8 semesters.

Maximum Time Frame

Under Federal regulation, the maximum time frame that a student may have to complete an undergraduate program is 150% of the published length of the educational program for a full-time student. Juniata College has chosen to make this measurement on a credit hour basis. In most cases, a student must have earned 120 credit hours to complete an undergraduate degree. Therefore, it is expected that all students will complete all degree requirements by the time the student has earned 180 credit hours. Transfer credits reflected on a student’s transcript count as attempted and earned credit hours. Students who do not complete their program within this time frame can continue to attend, but they will not be able to continue to receive financial aid. All Juniata sponsored Merit scholarships and need-based grants are limited to 8 semesters of eligibility, unless the student has experience unusual or mitigating circumstances that prevented degree completion within 8 semesters.

Additional Undergraduate Degrees

Students pursuing a second undergraduate, baccalaureate degree, including Teacher Certification, are limited to 90 attempted credit hours of work between receipt of the first degree and completion of the second. Second degree students may not receive federal financial aid beyond 90 attempted credit hours of enrollment in the second undergraduate degree program.

Frequency of Progress Checks

The Office of Student Financial Planning will conduct the official check of Satisfactory Academic Progress at the conclusion of the academic year, following spring semester, regardless of whether the student received financial aid or not.

If a student fails to achieve Satisfactory Academic Progress, the student will be informed of this via letter or electronic mail from the Office of Student Financial Planning. Included in this communication will be information on the student’s status, the effect of this status on the student’s financial aid eligibility, and any actions the student must take. The notice will be sent to the student’s most current addresses on file. It is the responsibility of the student to inform the College of a correct mailing address at all times. If sent by electronic mail, the student’s Juniata College electronic mail address will be used for all such communications.

The Dean of Students Office will be notified of students who failed to achieve Satisfactory Academic Progres.

Appeal Process

Following the first semester in which the student does not meet the Satisfactory Academic Progress standard, the student will not be able to receive financial aid for the next period of enrollment unless the student successfully appeals.

The requirements of this Satisfactory Academic Progress policy can be appealed based on the following circumstances:
• Death or serious injury or illness of an immediate relative
• Student injury or illness which required medical intervention
• Significant, unanticipated family obligations
• Catastrophic loss (e.g. flood, fire, etc.)
• Other special circumstances.

The student’s appeal must include:


• An explanation of why the student failed to make Satisfactory Academic Progress. In other words, explain how the circumstance prevented the student from performing up to his or her normal academic potential.
• A description of what has changed that will allow the student to achieve Satisfactory Academic Progress status in the coming semester.

To appeal the loss of Satisfactory Academic Progress status, the student should submit the information to the Juniata College Office of Student Financial Planning, along with any supporting documentation (e.g. death certificate, doctor’s note, letter from academic advisor or other 3rd party). The Director of Student Financial Planning reserves the right to request additional information on a case-by-case basis.

Approvals/Financial Aid Probation

Students who successfully appeal are granted Financial Aid Probation status for one semester. The student will be notified by letter or by electronic mail to their Juniata email account of the results of the SAP appeal.

The student should carefully review the SAP appeal notification, which will outline the unique, individualized SAP requirements the student must meet in order to maintain eligibility for federal financial aid. For example, a student who has failed to meet the 67% pace requirement, may be told in the appeal notification that s/he must maintain a higher minimum pace on a term by term basis, as well as earn a certain minimum GPA each semester, in order to maintain eligibility for federal financial aid. The student must keep the appeal notification for future reference.

Academic Plan/Statement of Intent

A part of the appeal process can be the establishment of an academic plan/statement of intent designed to help the student regain Satisfactory Academic Progress standing. The Academic Plan/Statement of Intent can be part of the student’s appeal. The academic plan/statement of intent is worked out between the student, his or her academic advisor, and/or the Registrars’ Office.

The academic plan/statement of intent is not required at the start of the probationary semester. But, if the student fails to regain Satisfactory Academic Progress status at the end of the probationary semester, the student must be successfully following the academic plan/statement of intent in order to continue to receive financial aid.

The academic plan/statement of intent must define how the student can regain Satisfactory Academic Progress status by a specific point in time.

Denials

If a SAP appeal is denied, the decision is final for the enrollment term specified by the student on the appeal form. A student may be able to re-establish eligibility on his/her own, for future semesters, by completing sufficient credit hours and/or improving his/her GPA such that s/he then meets the SAP requirements. Please contact The Office of Student Financial Planning if you have questions about reestablishing eligibility.

Financial Aid Probation

A student is considered to be on Financial Aid Probation during the first semester s/he receives federal financial aid under an approved SAP appeal.

Important - Please Note: A successful appeal of academic suspension is unrelated to financial aid suspension and does not result in reinstatement of a student’s financial aid eligibility. Appealing one’s financial aid suspension status is a separate process.

Miscellaneous

Repeated Courses

Some students repeat courses they have passed in order to raise their grade point averages (GPA). Be aware that repeating a course for which credit has been earned (a grade of “D-” or higher received), will not result in additional, earned (i.e. new) credit for financial aid/academic progress or degree requirement purposes. When repeating courses for which credit has already been earned, students should plan their class schedules carefully to ensure that they continue to meet SAP requirements.

Withdrawals

Courses for which a student receives a grade of "W" are included in the number of attempted hours, but do not count as earned credit hours for SAP purposes.

Transfer Credits
Transfer credits reflected on a student's Juniata academic transcript are counted as both attempted and earned credit hours for SAP purposes. This includes college credits earned either as a full or part-time college student at another institution or through dual enrollment.

Other Grades

Courses for which Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory grades are received count as both attempted and earned credit hours for SAP purposes. Courses for which a student receives the grade of “AU” (audit) will not count as attempted or earned for SAP courses.

*Renewal of Juniata Scholarships and Grants

Students receiving Juniata funding must earn an average of 12 credits per semester in order to have the award renewed, unless the student has experience unusual or mitigating circumstances that prevented him/her from completing the credits.

Juniata sponsored Merit scholarships and need-based grants are limited to 8 semesters of eligibility, unless the student has experience unusual or mitigating circumstances that prevented degree completion within 8 semesters.


Appeals

Students who fail to meet the progress standards noted above have several options.  They may supplement credit earned by attending summer school; they may continue without aid; or they may petition for the reinstatement of aid.  Appeals must be in writing and based on unusual, mitigating, or extraordinary circumstances which impeded their ability to maintain progress standards.  (NOTE: Appeals granted by the Office of Student Financial Planning have no bearing on decisions made by the Student Academic Development Committee.)


Expenses

At a time when most higher education institutions’ charges continue to outpace the general inflation rate, a Juniata College education remains affordable for students of appropriate academic ability.  Despite the continued rise in the costs of services required for education, Juniata has managed to hold inevitable fee increases to moderate levels, often resulting in pricing a Juniata education below that of comparable institutions, increasing the real value of our educational product.


General Fee

Charges are based on a general fee covering most of the annual costs to a student:

 

Resident Students

Non-resident Students

Fall Semester

$29,059

$22,688

Spring Semester

$29,059

$22,688

Total

$58,118

$45,376

The general fee is applied to regular instructional costs: use of Juniata’s library and instructional facilities; academic services; personal student services; and maintenance and other operational costs. The general fee for full-time students also covers many extracurricular expenses including: admission to all home athletic events and numerous campus social activities; most of the admission charges to designated, College-sponsored cultural programs; use of all recreational/athletic facilities; and subscriptions to the student newspaper (The Juniatian). A student paying the general fee may take a normal load of 12 to 18 hours per semester. When permission is given to register for work in excess of the normal program, either in a given semester or for the academic year, the overload fee is $520.00 for the 19th credit hour and $1,380.00 per credit for the 20th and 21st credit hours.

The yearly general fee for resident students also covers board charges and room rental for regularly announced periods when the dining hall and residence halls are open (see the College calendar). A limited number of students, with approval from the Dean of Students, may live off campus each year, but others are expected to reside on campus unless they live with parents or guardians and commute from home in the immediate area. There are two meal plan options for resident students and one meal plan for non-resident students.  Questions about meal plans should be addressed to Student Services.


Matriculation

Matriculation: When a student has been accepted for admission as a degree-seeking student, a $400 matriculation fee is to be paid by May 1. This nonrefundable fee reserves a space in the entering class.


Occasional Academic Fees

Auditing: The fee for auditing is $840 per course, and is waived for students in good standing who are regularly enrolled in a full-time College program.

Overload: Students registering for more than 18 hours per semester are charged $500 for the 19th credit hour and $1,380 per credit hour up to 21 credit hours.  Courses extending over more than one semester are prorated.  If the student withdraws from a course(s) following the drop/add period, this charge must still be paid.

Special Course Charges: Some courses have laboratory, studio, or special field experiences as significant parts of the course. A special fee of $30 is usually assessed for these courses, with the exception of Biology and Chemistry.  The fee for those courses is $100.  Other departments with courses which require a special course fee include: art, education, geology, music and physics. Some general education courses also require this fee.  The fee for students registering for off-campus student teaching is $50.

Private Instruction in Music: Regularly enrolled students who wish to take private music lessons for academic credit will be charged $780 for a two-credit, one hour per week lesson, or $390 for a one-credit, thirty-minute per week lesson.

Private Instruction in Ceramics: Regularly enrolled students who wish to take ceramics lessons for academic credit may do so as part of their normal academic program. If lessons constitute an overload, the normal overload charge applies.  Students who do not desire academic credit, or persons not regularly enrolled at the College, may take lessons for $1,000 per semester (one lesson per week).


Special Services Fees

Student Activity Fee: This fee provides funding to Student Government and the Juniata Activities Board. These organizations assist with support for student clubs, activities and organizations. This fee is assessed per semester. The Student Activity fee for full-time students is $105 per semester and for part-time students is $40 per semester.

Credentials: Fees for academic transcripts, co-curricular transcripts, and placement credentials will be covered by part of the student’s matriculation fee. Up to 25 copies of each are free and a fee of $5.00 each will be charged for subsequent documents.

Health and Wellness Services: All full-time students will be charged a $112 per semester College Health and Wellness Services fee. This fee entitles the student to unlimited visits to the Health Center and special health and wellness programming on campus. Prescription medications dispensed will be billed to the student at cost.

Medical Insurance Coverage: An Accident and Sickness Insurance plan is available and will be billed automatically to all full-time students. The annual premium for students is $1,616. Students may waive this charge by completing an online form and providing proof of coverage. Further information on this plan may be obtained by contacting the Business Office. 

Technology Fee: All students will be charged a technology fee at the beginning of each semester. Resident students will be charged $195 per semester; nonresident students will be charged $85 per semester. The Technology Fee for summer online courses is $7 per credit hour.  The fee includes access to campus computing resources, including but limited to the Internet, shared file storage for classes, printing, copying, general lab computing, and cable television.

Vehicle Registration: All vehicles brought to campus must be registered with the Security Office. On-campus resident students will be charged $75 per year, and off-campus resident and non-resident students will be charged $35 per year.


Part-time Fees

Course: Non-resident students who do not participate in the College program and do not use facilities other than classrooms, libraries, or other academic facilities, are charged $1,765 per semester hour when taking less than 12 semester hours. For persons holding bachelor’s degrees, the fee is reduced by one-half.

Summer Session: Students enrolling in summer courses will be charged $860 per credit hour unless they are participating in a program with special rates.  Tuition for summer online courses is $500 per credit hour.


Deposits

Student Security Deposit: Once a student enrolls at Juniata, $250 of the previously-paid matriculation fee establishes the student security deposit. Assessments and fines for damages to or loss of College property and other obligations are deducted from the deposit. When the balance of the deposit falls below $50, students are required to restore the deposit to its full $250 amount. After graduation or other separation from the College, the unexpended balance is refunded by check and mailed to the student’s home address.


Payment of Bills

The general fee is due and payable prior to the beginning of each semester. Fall and spring semester bills are due on August 8 and January 2, respectively. Financial settlement is required for all outstanding obligations. Students may be denied registration, room occupancy, and participation in extra-curricular activities without the necessary arrangements. Payment after the due date is subject to the late payment fee. Also, students cannot be granted honorable dismissal, end-of-term reports, transcripts of grades and credits, or diplomas until all College bills have been paid in full.

Monthly Payment Option: Students who wish to pay College bills on a monthly basis may use Tuition Management Systems. The interest-free, monthly payment option enables families to spread all or part of the annual expenses over equal, monthly payments. A small annual fee is charged. Low-interest monthly payment options, including an unsecured loan, a home equity credit line, and federally-backed loans, are also available. Students can contact Tuition Management Systems at 1-800-356-8329 or online at www.afford.com for more information on these programs. Also, the Office of Student Financial Planning can inform students of alternative financing strategies.

Credit Card/ACH:  Students who wish to pay College bills by either credit card or direct ACH Deposits from a bank account may do so by contacting CashNet through the Arch or have the student grant you access to the online payment website.  Any fees associated with these types of transactions are passed onto the student.


Credit Balances

Juniata will pay credit balances to students in a timely manner, usually within two weeks of the determination of the credit balance. Credits are deemed to be applied to bills in the order as indicated in the Student Financial Planning section of the catalog.


Late Fees

Late Payment: Any student who fails to pay his or her tuition, room, and board bill (or make proper arrangements with the Bursars Office) by the due date on the bill is charged a fee of 1.5% per month on past due balances.

Late Endorsement of Co-payee Checks: The College receives checks for tuition, room, and board made out to both the College and the student. The College may not use these funds until the check is endorsed by both the College and the student. The College will notify the student when such a check is received. Failure to endorse the check in a timely manner (generally within one week of notice date) will result in a charge of $5 for each subsequent week or part of a week.

Through an agreement with AES and other lender/guarantee agencies and the College, direct deposit of loan proceeds into the College’s bank account is permitted. Students should authorize this method of disbursement by checking the appropriate box on their loan application or signing an authorization form available in Accounting Services.

Registration Late Fee: Any student who fails to register or submit a (POE) Program of Emphasis plan by the published deadline, may be assessed a late fee of $50 for each incident.


Refund Policy

As the College has expenses of a continuing nature, usually incurred on an annual basis, it assumes that students, once enrolled, will remain for the semester. However, the College recognizes that individual circumstances, including serious illness or other emergency reasons, may dictate a withdrawal. Official notice with an explanation of the reason for withdrawal must be made to the Dean of Student Services. A case-by-case review of the particular circumstances will be made to determine refund eligibility (if any). The College uses a federally mandated refund procedure based on a percentage of semester completed to calculate charges and applicable credits for students serparating from the College after the semester begins.

We are required by federal statute to determine how much financial aid was earned by students who withdraw, drop out, are dismissed, or take a leave of absence prior to completing 60% of a payment period or term.

For a student who withdraws after the 60% point-in-time, there are no unearned funds. However, a school must still complete a Return calculation in order to determine whether the student is eligible for a post-withdrawal disbursement. 

The calculation is based on the percentage of earned aid using the following Federal Return of Title IV funds formula: 

Percentage of payment period or term completed = the number of days completed up to the withdrawal date divided by the total days in the payment period or term. (Any break of five days or more is not counted as part of the days in the term.) This percentage is also the percentage of earned aid.

Funds are returned to the appropriate federal program based on the percentage of unearned aid using the following formula:

Aid to be returned = (100% of the aid that could be disbursed minus the percentage of earned aid) multiplied by the total amount of aid that could have been disbursed during the payment period or term.

If a student earned less aid than was disbursed, the institution would be required to return a portion of the funds and the student would be required to return a portion of the funds. Keep in mind that when Title IV funds are returned, the student borrower may owe a debit balance to the institution.

If a student earned more aid than was disbursed to him/her, the institution would owe the student a post-withdrawal disbursement which must be paid within 120 days of the student's withdrawal.

The institution must return the amount of Title IV funds for which it is responsible no later than 45 days after the date of the determination of the date of the student’s withdrawal.

Tuition and Room Charges & Board Charges: Tuition, room charges, and board charges are pro-rated from the first day of class of each semester and is based on the percentage of the semester which has expired.  Tuition, room, and board charges will be assessed up to the 60% point.  There will not be a refund after the 60% mark.

All students who separate from the College, after the start of classes, will be assessed an administrative fee of $100.

The student security deposit will be retained for those students who have only temporarily separated. The deposit will be refunded if the student chooses not to return.

Financial Aid: The crediting of financial aid ceases for withdrawing students in the semester in which separation occurs. Federal regulations require that refunds be made in the same order as credited. Credits are applied to bills in the following order:

Summer Session, Occasional Academic and Part-time Fees: Refunds are calculated proportionately according to the above table.


Courses of Instruction

Accounting, Business, and Economics

Department Website:

https://www.juniata.edu/academics/departments/accounting-business-economics/

Faculty:

Background Information:

All business programs at Juniata College are crafted to give each student the tools to analyze, think, and perform.  To achieve these goals, each student is provided with the opportunity to learn to use information to make decisions, work effectively with others, communicate effectively, and have experiences, like internships and study abroad options, to develop the ability to think and act broadly. The department makes available several opportunities for “real world” experiential learning.

Special programs, facilities, or equipment:

Programs of Emphasis:

Student Designed Programs of Emphasis (examples):

Secondary Emphasis:

Internship/Research Experiences:

Courses:

 

EB-100   Introduction to Management (Variable; All Years; 3.00 Credits; S) This course develops an understanding of management principles in the areas of planning, organizing, staffing and control, including but not limited to the aspects of strategy, legal environment, operation/supply chain management.

EB-102   Introduction to Entrepreneurship (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Students will explore the personal ramification of becoming an entrepreneur. They will generate ideas for new business start-ups and learn how to determine whether an idea represents a viable business opportunity. Students will develop their concepts as far as possible toward the actual startup venture. Prerequisite: EB101 or permission of the instructor.

EB-105   International Economic Issues (Fall & Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S,I) Understanding international economics is increasingly important for private and public decision-makers. In a world of growing economic interdependence, the ability of policy makers to provide a stable environment for business is a key issue. Accordingly, this course develops the principle topics of international economics, including trade theory, the balance of payments, the cause and consequences of exchange rate movements, the flow of capital, currency crises and regional trade issues. The applied topics emphasized will be based on the most pressing current issues.

EB-120   Executive Leadership (Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; S) Students will study leadership styles and effective leadership practices in various settings, including entrepreneurship, private business, corporations, not-for-profit organizations and social movements.

EB-131   Financial Accounting (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Introduces fundamental principles and assumptions of accounting as they relate to transaction analysis and basic financial statements.

EB-140   Investing: Your Future (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; S) Saving too little can cost you a secure future. In this course you will learn to make informed judgments about how to save, how much to save, how to invest, what to believe, who to ask for advice, and how to choose among investments. Students with no investing knowledge but who are interested are especially encouraged to take this course.

EB-199   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows the department to offer special topics not normally offered. Departments may offer more than one special topic. Prerequisites vary by title.

EB-202   Behavioral Analysis of Organizations (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; CW,S,WK-SI) The broad focus of the course is to examine how individuals come together to form a successful organization. The course is broken into three major sections: people, organizations, and leadership. The course emphasizes student involvement and engages students in a variety of in-class exercises, case analysis role-playing exercises, small group exercises, and an off-campus class experience or two. One or more off-campus experiences are required for the course. Must be at sophomore standing or above. Pre- or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

EB-203   Introduction to Business Law (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S) An introduction to the American legal system as it applies to the business community. Emphasis is on basic legal concepts in contracts, real and personal property, agency and employment, and transaction of business through partnerships and corporations.

EB-204   Legal Regulation of Business (Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S) Examines the areas in which by statute the legislative branch of government regulates business. Topics include anti-trust law, bankruptcy, consumer protection, securities laws and the uniform commercial code. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

EB-206A   Fashion Marketing, Part 1 (Variable; Variable; 2.00 Credits; SW-GE) This Global Engagement course sequence (2-credit predeparture course in fall or spring semester plus a 2-credit short-term study abroad course in winter or summer term) is designed to provide students with a multidisciplinary exploration of fashion production and marketing in France and Morocco. This course provides classroom instruction along with practical experiences in France and Morocco to explore the cultural and economic impact of the fashion industry. Pre- or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109. Total fees for the experience are split evenly between the two courses, EB-206A and EB-206B.

EB-206B   Fashion Marketing, Part 2 (Variable; Variable; 2.00 Credits; SW-GE) This Global Engagement course sequence (2-credit predeparture course in fall or spring semester plus a 2-credit short-term study abroad course in winter or summer term) is designed to provide students with a multidisciplinary exploration of fashion production and marketing in France and Morocco. This course provides classroom instruction along with practical experiences in France and Morocco to explore the cultural and economic impact of the fashion industry. Pre-Req: EB-206A. Total fee for the experience are split evenly between the two courses, EB-206A and EB-206B.

EB-207   New Venture Creation (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Students will analyze business start-up successes and failures, develop their own new ideas for new ventures and learn how to determine when an idea represents a viable business opportunity. Students will pursue those opportunities as far as possible toward actual startup of the venture. Prerequisites: EB102.

EB-210   Quantitative Business Analysis (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; QM,S) This course introduces quantitative techniques for solving business problems and works to establish a link between data analysis and business decision- making. The course presents algebra, graphical methods, applied calculus, and descriptive statistics as tools to aid business decision makers. Prerequisites: High school algebra or pre-calculus.

EB-211   Business Statistics (Either Semester; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; QS,S) This course covers basic descriptive and inferential statistics, normal curve and z-score computations, and addresses hypothesis testing using Chi-Square, T-Test, ANOVA, and linear regression modelling.

EB-222   Principles of Macroeconomics (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Macroeconomic conditions affect individuals and businesses in numerous ways: employment opportunities, the purchasing power of wages and salaries, the cost of borrowing money, sales, profits, and competitiveness against foreign businesses. This course develops the theories relevant to understanding the business cycle, inflation, unemployment, deflation, exchange rates and balance of payments problems. It also examines the options and tradeoffs governments face as they seek to provide a stable macroeconomic environment through monetary and fiscal policies. Case studies of the macroeconomic performance and policies of diverse countries provide a comparative orientation. Prerequisites: Sophomore, Junior, or Senior standing

EB-223   Principles of Microeconomics (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) The optimizing behavior of households and firms serves as the focal point in this study of market-based resource allocation. Supply and demand analysis, spending and saving decisions of households, production and employment decisions of firms, alternative market structures, and environmental economics are among the topics covered. Prerequisite: Sophomore, Junior, or Senior standing.

EB-232   Intermediate Accounting I (Fall; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; S) A comprehensive study and application of generally accepted accounting principles for asset valuation, income measurement, and financial statement presentation for business organizations. Prerequisites: EB131.

EB-233   Intermediate Accounting II (Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; S) A continuation of the comprehensive study and application of generally accepted accounting principles for asset valuation, income measurement, and financial statement presentation for business organizations begun in Intermediate Accounting I. Prerequisite: EB232.

EB-236   Managerial Accounting (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; S,QM,CW) Emphasizes accounting concepts for the internal use of management in planning and control. Course focuses on spreadsheet applications to analyze management policies. Prerequisite: EB131.

EB-299   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows the department to offer special topics not normally offered. Departments may offer more than one special topic. Prerequisites vary by title.

EB-300   Business in China I (Spring; Yearly; 2.00 Credits; I,CA,SW-GE) This course will examine 1) the history of the Economic Reform that triggered the economic growth in 1988 in China; 2) the role that international trade has played that promoted the economic growth in China; 3) the civic life of China, particularly from the business perspective; and 4) the basic conversational Mandarin Chinese and Chinese business etiquette that help students get by in China. We will review basic economics concepts and introduce students to the fundamentals of economic theory. We will apply economic reasoning to think critically about the public policies, business decisions, and general tradeoffs that help explain the recent economic growth in China. Another objective of the course is to connect students with internship opportunities by physically visiting multinational enterprises in China and connecting with Juniata alumni in China. Students will gain a better understanding of China and better prepare those who want to start their careers in China. This course adds important value to the ABE department and the business curriculum as the course design is consistent with the college strategic plan with respect to China. Corequisite: EB301. Note: There are no refunds after drop/add ends.

EB-301   Business in China II (Summer; Yearly; 2.00 Credits; CA,I,SW-GE) This course will examine 1) the history of the Economic Reform that triggered the economic growth in 1988 in China; 2) the role that international trade has played that promoted the economic growth in China; 3) the civic life of China, particularly from the business perspective; and 4) the basic conversational Mandarin Chinese and Chinese business etiquette that help students get by in China. We will review basic economics concepts and introduce students to the fundamentals of economic theory. We will apply economic reasoning to think critically about the public policies, business decisions, and general tradeoffs that help explain the recent economic growth in China. Another objective of the course is to connect students with internship opportunities by physically visiting multinational enterprises in China and connecting with Juniata alumni in China. Students will gain a better understanding of China and better prepare those who want to start their careers in China. Corequisite: EB300.

EB-307   New Venture Start-Ups (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Students will develop their new ventures beyond the conceptual and planning stages by establishing actual operations-purchasing, manufacturing, marketing, etc. to generate revenue. They will implement whatever support systems (accounting, human resources, inventory management, etc.) are needed. Prerequisite: EB207.

EB-320   Intermediate Microeconomics (Fall; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S) Microeconomics analyzes the behavior of individual economic units such as consumers and firms. Intermediate microeconomics builds on the topics covered in principles of microeconomics and principles of macroeconomics. While those courses were more intuitive, this course explores microeconomics with a deeper degree of rigor using mathematical models to predict economic behavior. Prerequisites include EB223 and EB222.

EB-321   Intermediate Macroeconomics (Fall; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S) Intermediate Macroeconomics builds upon the concepts developed in principles of microeconomics and principles of macroeconomics. Macroeconomics in general tries to understand the aggregate behavior of economies rather than that of individual economic actors, and in this course we will study and use models that help explain what has happened in the past and predict what will occur. Prerequisites: EB222 and EB223.

EB-325   Health Economics (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Health Economics applies economic analysis to better understand the functioning of the healthcare industry. Topics will include demand for healthcare and health insurance, information problems, healthcare costs, comparative healthcare systems and healthcare policy. Prerequisite: EB223 Principles of Microeconomics

EB-332   Corporate Taxation (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S) This course is intended for undergraduates who desire to learn how the IRS code applies to corporations. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing.

EB-333   Governmental and Nonprofit Accounting (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Governmental and Nonprofit Accounting is designed to provide an overview of fundamental concepts and practices used in accounting for activities of governmental and non-business organizations. After successfully completing the course, students will be familiar with recording financial transactions, preparing financial reports, budgeting, auditing, and analyzing the results for federal, state and local governments, colleges and universities, healthcare organizations and other nonprofits. Prerequisite: EB 233 Intermediate Accounting II.

EB-335   Auditing (Fall; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S) Emphasizes current auditing principles and the objectives of independent accounting firms. Particular attention is placed on auditing procedures and the ethical and legal responsibilities of the auditor. Prerequisite: EB233.

EB-337   Cost Accounting (Either Semester; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) An analysis of the use of cost accounting systems to accumulate and allocate manufacturing costs. In order to support inventory valuation and emphasis is on solving real business problems. Prerequisite: EB236 and Junior or Senior standing.

EB-340   Investing Analysis (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; S) The course is meant to train portfolio managers. Students will maintain an online trading account and learn about fiduciary responsibility. They will assist portfolio managers by analyzing investments and with other tasks. This course prepares students to become portfolio managers. Prerequisites: EB140

EB-341   Production and Operations Management (Either Semester; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Examines the necessary things business firms must do to efficiently convert inputs to outputs. The course is about equally divided between qualitative operations management theory and quantitative tools that have been developed to solve typically occurring problems in production/ operations. Prerequisites: EB201.

EB-342   Management Information Systems (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) The study of how computer technology is used to gather, store, organize, retrieve, and transmit information within and between organizations. Topics include the organizational and technical foundations of information systems, the contemporary tools and techniques for building systems, and the management of information system resources. Emphasizes current computer platform applications and techniques used in business. Prerequisites: EB201 (EB201 can be taken concurrently) and Junior or Senior standing.

EB-351   Marketing Management (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Analyzes consumer behavior leading to the selection of products as well as pricing, promotion, and distribution strategies. Research projects help students apply concepts to the complexities of decision-making in marketing. Prerequisite: EB-100 or EB-101.

EB-355   Marketing Strategies (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Examines in depth the development and implementation of marketing strategies, for businesses and not-for-profits, for domestic and international businesses. Prerequisite: EB351.

EB-358   Marketing Research and Analytics (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) This course covers the three core pillars of analytics: Descriptive Analytics, Predictive Analytics, and Prescriptive Analytics, which helps students understand, conduct, interpret and evaluate basic statistics that are widely used in marketing research and in the process being able to critique research reports. Students will be trained to utilize computer software in conducting statistical analyses. Prerequisite: EB-351

EB-359   Advertising & Promo Mgmt (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) This promotion management course is designed to give students an in-depth examination of integrated marketing communication and how it relates to handling promoting an organization, a campaign, a product and (or) service, or any other specific cause. The course will look at various promotional techniques such as public relations, various sources of advertising and marketing, and the utilization of direct sales approaches, with the focus on the marketing mix to the various aspects of communications that take place between the firm and its customers. At the same time, this course lends itself to studying both applied and theoretical issues to give students both a real-world view of advertising and promotions, as well as frameworks for understanding such real-world decisions. The course will offer an insight into strategies that can be developed and implemented to manage promotional activities. Pre-Req: EB-351

EB-361   Financial Management I (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) The management of business assets and liabilities and the concurrent creation of sources and the use of funds. Special attention is given to financial statement analysis and decisions involving working capital management. Prerequisite: EB131 and Junior or Senior standing.

EB-362   Financial Management II (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; QM,S) Special attention to long-term external sources of funds. Capital budgeting under uncertainty, security market processes, strategies for debt/ equity mix, and portfolio theory are covered. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing.

EB-363   Health Care Financial Management (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Emphasizes health care decision making using financial information. The course focuses on unique financial characteristics in the health care industry, such as the mix of government and non-government providers and payers, complex payment systems, and the interactions between providers, insurance companies and consumers. Prerequisite: EB131.

EB-371   Human Resource Management. (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) The early part of the course takes an in-depth look at the fundamental nature of the employer- employee relationship. The fundamental framework is then used to evaluate traditional aspects of Human Resource Management practice: Selection, training, recruitment, performance appraisals, and compensation. Class time involves some lecture, in-class exercises, guest speakers from industry, and case analyses. Prerequisites: EB202 or PACS202.

EB-375   21st Century Leadership (Spring; All Years; 3.00 Credits; S,CTGES) This course examines the challenges of providing leadership in the information age of global and cultural contexts. Leadership as manifested in today's workplace provides both opportunity and a great responsibility. The role and function of leaders look very different today than years ago. Change is the norm. Leaders must understand today's challenges and be able to function effectively given a borderless, multicultural, virtual, and diverse group of followers. No prerequisites.

EB-377   Sports Management (Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S,CS) Sports Management will explore the many business and socio-cultural aspects of the business of sports. Sport plays an increasingly significant role in our world as professional and collegiate sports attract more and more of our entertainment spending and sports personalities become more central and idolized in society. This exploration of the sports industry will connect well with other areas of business study: organizational behavior, strategy, human resource management, and marketing. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

EB-379   Bargaining and Conflict Management (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S,CS) Bargaining and Conflict Management provides students with an opportunity to learn about bargaining and conflict-management theory. Students will have the opportunity to explore and apply this theory, and to examine aspects of bargaining style, in a variety of bargaining simulations. The course will also have an international component by utilizing international bargaining simulations as an instructional tool. Prerequisite: EB202 or PACS202.

EB-381   International Political Economy (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S,I) The pursuit of wealth and power, profit and privilege, corporate growth and national security occurs in a global context. This course examines the business agendas and political priorities that find expression in the policy agreements and institutional agreements of the contemporary global economy. The course is conducted as a seminar and requires a substantial research project. Prerequisite: EB105.

EB-399   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Offers special studies to meet the interest and demands of Students. Note: Students may take each ST: course for credit.

EB-407   Entrepreneurship (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Examines the application of administrative and functional fields to small business situations. Special attention is given to the problems typical of the small business. Projects and local businesses may be used as cases. Prerequisites: EB307 or permission of the instructor.

EB-440   Portfolio Management I (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; S) Students manage the Juniata College student portfolio, making all investment decisions about policy, trading, and long term goals. They present a progress report to the public, benchmark and account for the investments, and defend their choices. Prerequisites: EB-340 or EB-362.

EB-441   Portfolio Management II (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; S) Students manage the Juniata College student portfolio, making all investment decisions about policy, trading, and long term goals. They present a progress report to the public, benchmark and account for the investments, and defend their choices. Prerequisite: EB-440.

EB-442   Portfolio Management III (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; S) Students manage the Juniata College student portfolio, making all investment decisions about policy, trading, and long term goals. They present a progress report to the public, benchmark and account for the investments, and defend their choices. Prerequisite: EB-441.

EB-443   Portfolio Management IV (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; S) Students manage the Juniata College student portfolio, making all investment decisions about policy, trading, and long term goals. They present a progress report to the public, benchmark and account for the investments, and defend their choices. Prerequisite: EB-442.

EB-463   Financial Markets & Institutions (Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S,I) The role of credit and capital and the function of dollar and Euro bonds in today's internationalized financial markets are investigated empirically and assessed analytically in this course. Numerous economic theories relevant to understanding the behavior of various asset markets are developed, including portfolio and asset models of exchange rate determination and currency speculation. The costs and benefits of alternative government policies such as financial regulation and capital and foreign exchange controls are weighed. Prerequisite: EB222.

EB-464   Investments (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) The study of the basic concepts, analysis techniques and strategies for investing in portfolios of securities. Stocks, bonds, options and futures are examined as well as fundamental, technical and efficient market strategies. Prerequisites: EB 362.

EB-465   Financial Theory and Analysis (Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S) Financial Theory & Analysis will be a finance elective aimed at juniors and seniors. EB465's purpose is to develop an understanding of traditional modern portfolio theory, recent challenges to this orthodoxy, empirical knowledge of asset performance and how to apply this knowledge to specific contexts, i.e. creating an appropriate portfolio. Prerequisites: EB211 and EB362. MA220 may be used as a replacement for EB211 only.

EB-470   Distinction Seminar (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00-4.00 Credits; S)

EB-480   Senior Seminar (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) A capstone course for POE in Business. Through the use of readings, case studies and simulations, students in the course will formulate corporate strategy and implement it in a competitive environment. How firms may gain and sustain competitive advantage with the formulated strategy will be examined. In addition, students will also be trained to craft business reports on corporate strategies. The evaluation of performance will mainly depend on the content and the quality of the business reports.

EB-490   Business Internship (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 2.00-9.00 Credits; S) Develops students' skills, through practical experiences or field projects which require proposals for problem analysis and solution. The experiences and projects are provided by local businesses or other organizations and use technical and decision skills developed in students' areas of concentration. Note: Limited availability. May be repeated up to a total of 9 hours credit. Corequisite: EB495. Prerequisites: Permission and Jr. or Sr. standing.

EB-495   Business Internship Seminar (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 2.00-6.00 Credits; S) Requires students to reflect on the experience and/or pursue relevant research. Note: Limited availability. May be repeated up to a total of 6 hours credit. Corequisite: EB490. Prerequisites: Permission.

EB-499   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) This course allows departments to offer topics not normally taught to be offered. Prerequisites and title vary by section.

EB-TUT   Business Teaching Assistant (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S)

Fine Arts

Department Website:

https://www.juniata.edu/academics/departments/art

Faculty:

Background Information:

The Department of Fine Arts at Juniata is an integral part of the liberal arts experience. The department aims to promote the creation, study, interpretation, preservation, and enjoyment of the visual arts. Through studies in the Fine Arts, students develop a strong understanding of artistic creativity, expression, and aesthetic judgment. They learn how to research and analyze art critically, and how to explore the elements that compose a work of art and the manner in which those elements contribute to the creative expression of an idea. Students may focus in any one or a combination of three areas: Art History, Museum Studies, and Studio Arts. International opportunities include study in the UK, Germany, Spain, Italy, France, Japan, and the Czech Republic.

Special programs, facilities, and equipment:

Specific department policy:

Awarding credit for AP exam scores

The department of art and art history will grant generic 100-level F credit to all students earning scores of 4 or 5 on their Advanced Placement exams. If students feel strongly that a particular AP class should exempt them from taking an introductory course, such as Survey of Western Art or Beginning Drawing for example, then they can make that case with the Chair or the appropriate member of the department.

Programs of Emphasis:

Individualized Programs of Emphasis:

 

Secondary Emphasis:

Internship/Research Experiences:

Courses:

AR-103   Beginning Drawing (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; F,WK-CE) This course will explore the fundamental concerns as well as representational methods and concepts. Using line, shape, form, volumetexture, and the effective spatial organization of these elements, students will develop perceptual and technical skills to interpret form and space. Students will work with graphite and charcoal, pencil, ink, and other media. Pre-Req or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

AR-104   Design and Color (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; F,CTDH) The discipline of design is basic to all forms of visual art, including painting, drawing, photography, ceramics, and illustration. This course is designed to acquaint the student with the basic elements of picture structure: composition, line, shape, value, texture, color, scale, proportion, tension, and balance.

AR-117   Intro to Sculpture (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; F,WK-CE) This course is an introduction to the foundational concepts and creation of sculpture. We will explore various techniques related to wood working, metal working, fiber arts, and glass casting; along with aesthetic, historical, and cultural considerations associated with 3-dimensional art. Through this course, students will begin developing their artistic voice by experimenting with and apply these concerns in their work.

AR-125   Explorations in Clay (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; F,WK-CE) This course introduces students to the basic techniques of hand-built ceramics. The fabrication techniques of pinching, coiling, and slabbing are combined with conceptual concerns of creating art pottery. Throughout the course of the semester students will develop their skills and understanding of Art both as a maker and as an audience. Pre- or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

AR-175   Introduction to Nature Photography (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; F,WK-CE) This course is an introduction to nature photography. Students will learn to capture a balanced composition that represents elements of nature through digital photography. Pre- or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

AR-199   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) An introduction to one of the branches of art not currently included in the regular course offerings. Prerequisites will vary based on the course being offered. Special fees may apply.

AR-200   Beginning Painting (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; F,WK-CE) Introductory course which investigates perceptual and technical aspects of painting which build off of Drawing, 2D Design and Art History. Students work in oil paint, learn various support construction, mediums, traditional methods (including making and altering paint chemistry) and color theory. Demonstration, reading, lectures and slide presentations supplement studio sessions and outside projects. Materials are ordered for the student. Taking an introductory level drawing course prior to enrollment in Basic Painting is highly encouraged (but not mandatory). Note: Drawing courses from high school may provide adequate preparation. Please contact the course instructor for more information. Pre-Req or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109

AR-202   Water-Based Media Painting (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; F,WK-CE) An introductory course that investigates perceptual and technical aspects of painting which build off of drawing, 2D design, and art history. Students work in water-based paint, learn various support construction, mediums, traditional methods (including making and altering paint chemistry), and color theory. Demonstration, reading, lectures, and slide presentations supplement studio sessions and outside projects. Materials are ordered for the student. Taking an introductory level drawing course prior to enrollment in painting class is highly encouraged (but not mandatory). Note: Drawing courses from high school may provide adequate preparation. Please contact the course instructor for more information. Pre- or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

AR-203   Digital Photography I (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; F,WK-CE) This course focuses on photography and the creation of digital imagery. Students will learn to operate a DSLR camera and complete projects utilizing a variety of photographic techniques and genres. Students will learn to express visual concepts through photography while utilizing specific techniques unique to the creation of digital photographic artwork. Final works will be exhibited electronically and in print. Students will also look at the work of contemporary photographers and prepare a presentation on one photographer. The course utilizes primarily Adobe Photoshop on a Mac platform. Pre- or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

AR-204   Digital Art I (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; F,CTDH,WK-CE) This course focuses on the creation of art through electronic processes. Adobe Creative Cloud and other apps will be utilized along with scanners, cameras, and printers. Final works will be exhibited electronically and in print.

AR-208   Beginning Photography (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; F,WK-CE) This foundational photography course does not assume any prior knowledge of black and white materials or 35mm camera operation. It is designed to introduce students to basic principles of camera and darkroom equipment operation. Students will seek a fine balance between technical acquisition of the photographic skills (such as correct film exposure, film development, and paper processing) and the ability to implement them to communicate a personal vision. Emphasis will be placed on learning basic principles of photography and an ability to express this knowledge creatively through high quality black and white photographs. Students will be exposed to aspects of the history of photography and visual language in photography today. Pre-Req or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109

AR-211   The Art of Bookmaking (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; F,WK-CE) This course will introduce fiber to students at its most sophisticated and expressive, mode: Book Arts. Students will be taught basic book-making techniques as well as a brief history of visual communication (both functionally and aesthetically). Students will create projects that challenge traditional notions of the book within the visual arts. Students will participate in such activities as papermaking, sewing, stitching, and other techniques used to alter the idea of published material and written communication. Note: Additional lab fees apply. Pre-Req or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109

AR-215   Ceramic Sculpture (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; F,WK-CE) Ceramic Sculpture introduces students to the basic methods and techniques of creating three-dimensional objects in clay. Students will learn various hand-building techniques as well as the technical, historical, and cultural considerations associated with 3-dimensional art. Through this course, students will develop their own artistic voice by experimenting with and apply these concerns in their ceramic work. Pre-requisite or co-requisite: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109

AR-220   Formulating Beauty: Ceramic Chemistry (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; WK-SP) This course is an introduction to ceramic chemistry as related to the formulation of glaze for ceramic wares. Students will engage in experimentation with various materials to gain an understanding of how they contribute to and affect the fired glaze. Along with formulation, health hazards and food safety will be addressed and investigated throughout the course. Pre-requisite: FYC-101

AR-225   Wheel Throwing (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; F,WK-CE) This course will introduce students to the techniques of the potter's wheel and expressive qualities of clay as an artistic medium as well as an essential commodity. Students will learn wheel-throwing techniques to incorporate form, function, and design with each project. Pre-Req or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109

AR-235   Empty Bowls Practicum (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; F,SW-LE) Students will learn to create functional bowls to be donated to the annual Empty Bowls fundraising event that supports Huntingdon County food banks. Additional and complementary topics will include philanthropy, altruism, and empathy-building activities. Students will develop the knowledge and skills needed to engage effectively with the local communities they will inhabit throughout their lives. Creative thought and discourse will occur throughout the semester.

AR-298   Mixed Media Animation (Alternate Years; Variable; 4.00 Credits; F) Introduces students to animation through stop motion techniques and 2D computer animation. An emphasis is placed on story-telling and examining the physics of movement. Adobe Creative Cloud apps will be used in addition to Dragon Frame and traditional stop motion techniques. Projects will start by exploring the history of animation techniques and principles and culminate in independent projects.

AR-299   Special Topic (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) An introduction to one of the branches of art not currently included in the regular course offerings. Prerequisites vary based on the course offering. Special fees may apply.

AR-300   Intermediate Painting (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; F) This course is designed for advanced students to broaden their understanding of painting, refine techniques, visualize sophistication of concepts, and begin building a personal portfolio that reveals an attempt at a search for meaning/content, personal style, and individual expression. Students will build upon foundational painting skills acquired in introductory level painting by exploring color and tonal relationship through a variety of applications and techniques of the oil media. Students will also investigate descriptive and expressive possibilities in painting introduced through technical and conceptual painting problems designed to develop observational and conceptual awareness. Prerequisites: AR200 and Art POE or permission of the instructor. Note: A special fee for art supplies is applied.

AR-305   Intermediate Ceramics (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; F) This course will investigate advanced ceramic techniques and concepts to strengthen students' abilities to utilize clay as a creative medium. Sophisticated and expansive projects will merge personal investigation, aesthetic sensibilities, and technical skills as a means of expression. Students will participate in other areas of ceramics, such as loading and unloading kilns and making clay. Prerequisites - Take ONE of the following: AR-125, AR-215, AR-225, AR-235, or by permission.

AR-308   Intermediate Photography (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; F) Building upon the experiences of Basic Photography, this course will concentrate on black and white photography; however, students will be encouraged to go beyond the boundaries of a conventional black and white print by incorporating a range of techniques, paper sizes, and alternative processes. Students will be exposed to the work of early and contemporary photographers through thematically structured lectures based upon significant historical and contemporary themes, concepts, and ideas. Students will be expected to produce work with deeper content and individual expression. Prerequisite: AR208. Note: A special fee for art supplies is assessed.

AR-323   Wheel Throwing II (Either Semester; Variable; 3.00 Credits; F) This course is designed to investigate more complex theories and techniques of wheel-thrown ceramics. Sophisticated and expansive projects will fuse personal investigation, aesthetic sensibilities, and technical skills as a means of expression. Students are encouraged to challenge constraints of the material as well as their comfort level - it is only through the process of trying that one can never truly fail. Prerequisites: AR225. Note: A special supply fee is assessed on this course.

AR-335   Empty Bowls Practicum (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; F) Students enrolled in AR335 will create functional bowls to be donated to the annual Empty Bowls event in order to raise money for Huntingdon County food banks. Reflection on philanthropy and national hunger will be the secondary focus of the course. Prerequisite: AR225

AR-392   Museum Education (Fall; Variable; 3.00 Credits; F) This course will study the history, theory, and practice of museum education. The class combines lectures, round table discussions, and design strategies for successful museum education programs for a variety of audiences. Students implement their learned skills through a series of programs that they design and implement for pre-selected groups. Prerequisites: AR-110 or AR-130.

AR-395   Advanced Photography Topics (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; F) This course will expand upon students' understanding of photography and digital art. The class is structured around modules that dive into different genres, like documentary, still life, or fashion, and will end with an ambitious self-directed project. Advanced shooting, editing, and printing techniques will be covered. PRE-REQ (either/or): Digital Art (AR204), Digital Photo (AR203), BW Photo (AR208) Course Fee

AR-398   3D Computer Animation (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; F) Introduction to 3D animation using Autodesk Maya, though other programs will be used. Emphasis is placed on improving time-based design and story-telling by studies that explore movement, cinematography, editing, sound, and lighting. Prerequisite: AR-104 or AR-204 or IM-110 or AR-298.

AR-399   Special Topics in Art (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) An introduction to one of the branches of art not offered. Prerequisites vary based on the course offering. Special fees may apply.

AR-400   Advanced Painting (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; F) This course is designed for advanced students to broaden their understanding of painting, and their refine techniques. This course will help students build a personal portfolio that conveys a search for meaning/content, personal style, and individual expression. Students will build upon painting skills acquired in introductory and intermediate level painting courses by investigating descriptive and expressive possibilities in painting. Painting abilities and techniques should be refined this semester, as well as sophistication of concepts. An emphasis will be placed on solving conceptual problems in painting in a context relevant to contemporary art. Prerequisites: AR200 and AR300 and Art POE or permission of the instructor. Note: A special fee for art supplies is assessed.

AR-405   Advanced Ceramics (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; F) Students will propose individually-designed, sophisticated and expansive projects that display dedication to a cumulative sense of aesthetic sensibilities, technique(s), visual vocabulary, and concept utilizing clay as the primary medium. Creative thought and discourse will occur throughout the semester. Interaction will be expected during open forum sessions of AR405. Prerequisites - AR305 or by permission. Additional lab fees apply.

AR-451   Capstone in 2D Studio Art I (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; F) This course provides students with the time, focus, and experience to develop an art portfolio in preparation for entrance to graduate art programs or a career in visual arts. Students must have twelve credits of advanced courses (300 and 400 level) in one or more of the following art disciplines: Drawing, Painting, Photography, Ceramics, Sculpture (3-D arts), and Art History.

AR-452   Capstone in 2D Studio Art II (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; F) This course provides students with the time, focus, and experience to develop an art portfolio in preparation for entrance to graduate art programs or a career in visual arts. Students must have twelve credits of advanced courses (300 and 400 level) in one or more of the following art disciplines: Drawing, Painting, Photography, Ceramics, Sculpture (3-D arts) and Art history.

AR-453   Capstone in 3D Studio Art I (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; F) This course provides students with the time, focus, and experience to develop an art portfolio in preparation for entrance to graduate art programs or a career in visual arts. Students must have twelve credits of advanced courses (300 and 400 level) in one or more of the following art disciplines: Drawing, Painting, Photography, Ceramics, Sculpture (3-D arts) and Art history.

AR-454   Capstone in 3D Studio Art II (Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; F) Students will create a body of work to display in the spring Capstone exhibition. Independent investigations may vary in medium; capstones are offered to students who have displayed advanced talent and comprehension of material(s). Sophisticated and expansive projects will be individually designed by each student that displays dedication to a cumulative sense of aesthetic sensibilities, technique(s), visual vocabulary, and concept. Creative thought and discourse will occur throughout the semester. Interaction will be expected during open forum sessions of AR-454. Prerequisite: AR-405 or by permission. Additional lab fees apply.

AR-490   Art Internship (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 2.00-9.00 Credits; F) Students will work under the supervision and guidance of a faculty member or internship sponsor. Internships may be in the fields of the fine arts, art history, or museum studies. Students may work as fine arts apprentices, museum interns, curatorial assistants, etc. Note: May be repeated to a total of 9 credit hours. Prerequisites: Permission and Jr. or Sr. standing. Corequisites: AR495.

AR-495   Art Research Seminar (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 2.00-6.00 Credits; F) Requires student to reflect on the experience and/or pursue relevant research. Corequisites: AR 490. Prerequisites: permission.

AR-498   Digital Photography II (Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; F) This course expands upon the skills learned in Art 203 or Art 208 and exposes students to more advanced skills in fine arts digital photography. Students will work on advanced projects, skills and the creation of a final portfolio. There will be a field trip. Note: a special fee for supplies, equipment and field trip will be applied. Prerequisites: Any ONE of the following courses: AR203 or AR208.

AR-499   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows departments to offer topics not normally offered. Prerequisites and fees vary by title.

AR-TUT   Art Teaching Assistant (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits)

Biology

Department Website:

https://www.juniata.edu/academics/departments/biology/

Faculty:

Background Information:

Modern biology is a field that draws extensively on other disciplines such as chemistry, physics and computer science and requires strong quantitative and critical thinking skills.  Biology is an extremely popular subject with Juniata students: approximately one third of all Juniata students have a Program of Emphasis that relates to biology one way or another. These students form a "critical mass" of high quality peers interested in all facets of biology. Their interactions contribute extensively to a first class experience in the cross-disciplinary nature of the subject, and the ethical and societal impact of many areas of biology contributes to the fullness of a liberal arts education. With biology as a focus, students are well prepared to pursue graduate studies in research or medicine, or careers in the biological sciences, including sub-fields such as ecology, molecular biology, education or allied health.

Special programs, facilities, and equipment

Dedicated in October 2002, over 30% of the facility's 88,000 square feet is devoted solely to areas where students and professors can work hand-in-hand     conducting research in Biology and Chemistry. Juniata students will be introduced to the latest technology and equipment, including laboratories for cell and tissue culture, atomic and magnetic resonance spectroscopy and chromatography, as well as a biological separations room.

Transmission and scanning electron microscopes
Light Microscopy core facility with wide field and scanning confocal fluorescence microscopes
Automated DNA sequencer
Cell culture core facility

Multichannel gas exchange system for metabolic measurements 
Vertebrate Museum 
Greenhouse

Spend a semester experiencing the Northern Appalachians where you'll take all your courses at the field station and live in lodges next to Shuster Hall.

Programs of Emphasis:

Individualized Programs of Emphasis: (for example)

Internship/Research Experiences:

Specific department policy:

Waitlist Policy for establishing a waitlist for 300 and 400 level Biology courses during the spring registration period.

1. First priority- Juniors (rising seniors)

2. Second priority - Sophomores (rising juniors)

Exceptions:  

1.  Freshmen (rising sophomore) with a Biology/Secondary Education POE wanting Biostats as a math course must take it by the end of the sophomore year.  These students will be given special consideration if space remains after all first priority students are enrolled. 

2.  Students in the following 2+ or 3+ affiliated programs must fulfill courses requirements by the end of the sophomore year for 2+ programs and end of junior year for 3+ programs.  

Students with the necessary prerequisites and that are applying to one of the accelerated (2+/3+) programs listed will be given special consideration if space remains after all first priority students are enrolled.

Awarding credit for AP exam scores:  A student with an AP score of 4 or 5 will receive 3 Natural Science credits, but is not waived from taking BI-105, BI-106, BI-121 or BI-122

Courses:

BI-101   General Biology I (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits) General Biology I is the first course in the Biology POE core curriculum. This course will be structured around four primary case studies on the opioid crisis, climate change, environmental toxicology and the evolution of speed in animals. The cases will outline foundational concepts in molecular biology and evolution.

BI-102   General Biology II (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits) This class will emphasize student engagement in the research process along with basic research skills. Students will engage in research projects with their professors. The course will include hands-on laboratory technique development, experimental design, hypothesis testing, and scientific writing. Prerequisite: BI-101 or BI-105

BI-106   Functions of Cells and Organisms (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N,CTGES) The second course in the introductory biology series. This course is divided into two half semester modules: cell and molecular biology and the physiology and systems of plants and animals. Prerequisites: CH142.

BI-159   Natural History of Florida (Spring; Variable; 1.00 Credit) This course examines the diverse, unique ecosystems of Florida. A combination of lectures and discussions are supplemented by a week-long trip to Florida. We will explore Florida's ecosystems through first-hand experiences.

BI-190   Human Biology (Either Semester; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N,WK-SP,CTGES) Course is a non-majors approach to the basic chemistry and biology of the human body, as well as how humans fit into society and environment. Emphasis will be on applying scientific process to current health topics. Course required for the Social Work POE and included in the Genomics Certificate and Rural Poverty Studies secondary.

BI-199   BI Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows department to offer topics not normally taught. Prerequisites and Corequisites vary by title.

BI-231   Microbiology I (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) Focuses on the structure, function, growth, genetics and ecology of viral, bacterial, and fungal microorganisms. Basic concepts are emphasized and topics important to the quality of human life are examined. Corequisite: BI 232. Prerequisite: BI106 and CH144.

BI-232   Microbiology Laboratory I (Fall; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; N) Presents procedures and experiments which demonstrate basic micro-biological concepts and techniques. Illustrates and augments the content of the lecture. Note: A special fee is assessed. Corequisite: BI231.

BI-270   Infectious Disease & Society (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; CA,N,WK-SP,CTGES) This course focuses primarily on the impact of human infectious diseases that have changed the world. Each disease is analyzed from five distinct perspectives: Clinical, Historical, Economic, Artistic, and Public Health. We also discuss genomics aspects of the infective organisms and of their human hosts. Pre- or co-requisite: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109

BI-289   Frontiers of Biology (Fall; Yearly; 1.00 Credit) Seminar series, required in all Biology POE's in the Sophomore year, consisting of research seminars given by invited speakers and members of the department, both faculty and students. Descriptions of independent research, internship and study abroad opportunities as well as reports by students and faculty on experiences in these programs will be presented. .

BI-290   Nutrition (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N,WK-SP) This course covers basic principles and facts about nutrition, explores the role of nutrition in human health, and considers a range of societal and political issues surrounding food and nutrition in the U.S. and abroad. Prerequisite: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

BI-299   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows the Biology department to offer topics not on the regular schedule. Prerequisites will vary based on topic.

BI-300   General Ecology (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) Examines the interactions of living organisms with their physical, chemical, and biotic environments. Special attention is given to the environmental, biological, and historical factors affecting the distribution, abundance, adaptation, and diversity of species in natural communities. This course deals with " ecological principles " , and as such complements the Introduction to Environmental Science course, which deals with environmental issues. Prerequisite: BI-101 or BI-105. Corequisite: BI-301 or BI-301CW.

BI-301   General Ecology Lab (Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; N) Students work together as research teams to carry out original investigations on the ecology of local species and natural communities. Emphasis on ecological research design, data collection and analysis, and oral and written presentation of results. Field trips are included. Prerequisite: BI-101 or BI-105. Corequisite: BI-300.

BI-301CW   General Ecology Lab (Spring; Yearly; 2.00 Credits; N,CW) Students work together as research teams to carry out original investigations on the ecology of local species and natural communities. Emphasis on ecological research design, data collection and analysis, and oral and written presentation of results. Frequent field trips are included. Note: a special fee is assessed and one optional field trip requires an additional fee. This section of general ecology lab contains added emphasis on writing to fulfill college writing requirements. Frequent field trips are included. Note: a special lab fee is assessed and one field trip may require an additional fee. Corequisite: BI300.

BI-305   Biostatistics (Fall; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N,QS,CTGES) This course deals centrally with quantitative and statistical methodology in the biological sciences. It includes experimental design and the conventions of generating, analyzing, interpreting and presenting biological data. Counts as a math course for graduate and professional school requirements. Prerequisites: BI-102 or BI-106 or ESS-100.

BI-305CW   Biostatistics (Fall; Yearly; 5.00 Credits; N,QS,CW,CTGES) This course deals centrally with quantitative and statistical methodology in the biological sciences. It includes experimental design and the conventions of generating, analyzing, interpreting and presenting biological data. Counts as a math course for graduate and professional school requirements. This writing intensive section requires the writing of an individual research report and one additional hour of class time to discuss writing in biology. Prerequisites: BI-102 or BI-106 or ESS-100.

BI-310   Physiology (Fall; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N) A combined laboratory and lecture course which examines the function of cells, tissues, organs, and systems. Physical, Mathematical, chemical, and anatomical concepts are integrated to gain a comprehensive appreciation of the dynamics of living organisms. Students are introduced to the use of physiological instrumentation, experimental design, collection and statistical analysis of data, and preparation of scientific manuscripts. Laboratory experiments amplify and complement the lectures. Pre-Reqs: BI-102 or BI-106; CH-232 or CH-242.

BI-310CW   Physiology (Fall; Yearly; 5.00 Credits; N,CW) A combined laboratory and lecture course which examines the function of cells, tissues, organs, and systems. Physical, Mathematical, chemical, and anatomical concepts are integrated to gain a comprehensive appreciation of the dynamics of living organisms. Students are introduced to the use of physiological instrumentation, experimental design, collection and statistical analysis of data, and preparation of scientific manuscripts. Laboratory experiments amplify and complement the lectures. In addition, students taking this Writing version of BI310 receive additional instruction regarding writing in Biology and produce a well-researched paper on a topic in Physiology. Pre-Reqs: BI-102 or BI-106; CH-232 or CH-242.

BI-316   Molecular & Cellular Biology. (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) A comprehensive approach to the study of cells, with emphasis on molecular techniques and understanding the primary literature. Analysis of the cell at the molecular level emphasizes a unity in the principles by which cells function.

BI-318   Developmental Biology (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) This course offers comprehensive investigation of the concepts and mechanisms of development, including ganetogenesis, fertilization, pattern formation and organogenesis. The course examines classical and molecular approaches examining problems of development. Students are expected to present research from current literature in the field. Prerequisites: BI-106 or BI-102; CH-232 or CH-242.

BI-318CW   Developmental Biology (Fall; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N,CW) This course offers comprehensive investigation of the concepts and mechanisms of development, including ganetogenesis, fertilization, pattern formation and organogenesis. The course examines classical and molecular approaches examining problems of development. Students are expected to present research from current literature in the field. This course is the CW version of BI318. In addition to the topic of Developmental Biology, students will receive instruction related to writing in the biological sciences and will be required to produce a well-researched paper on a topic in developmental biology. Prerequisites: BI-106 or BI-102; CH-232 or CH-242.

BI-321   Ecological Genetics (Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; N,QS) Ecological genetics is concerned with the genetics of ecologically and evolutionarily important traits, that is, traits related to fitness such as survival, growth, and reproduction. It is the study of the process of phenotypic evolution occurring in present-day natural populations. Basic and advanced concepts in population and quantitative genetics are covered, including measuring selection on phenotypic characters, with a focus on methods applicable to field studies of ecologically important traits. Mathematical and conceptual material are fully integrated and explained. Application to conservation, spread of invasive species, evolution of pesticide, herbicide, and antibiotic resistance, and environmental effects of genetically modified organisms used in agriculture will be covered. Lab period will be devoted to problem solving, discussion group, experimental manipulation and simulation studies, and independent student research projects. Prerequisites: BI105 and BI106 and BI305 or MA220.

BI-323   Mammalogy (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; N) Examines the comparative biology of living mammals, including taxonomy, evolution, biogeography, ecology, morphology, physiology and behavior. Special attention is given to conservation issues, the relevance of mammals in modern biological research, and field techniques for studying mammals. Prerequisites: BI105 or permission of the instructor.

BI-324   Ornithology (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) This course provides a comprehensive survey of the comparative biology, ecology, and behavior of birds with a special focus on issues pertaining to conservation and management. Laboratory activities focus on field identification of birds and research and monitoring techniques. Several field trips are possible with one possible 3 day trip to Assatteague Island. Prerequisite: BI105.

BI-325   Plant Ecology (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) Primarily an ecology course, but also included is a significant amount of plant identification and/classification and plant epochology. The ecology portion will cover the whole spectrum of this fast-growing field; from communities and ecosystems to theory and adaptation. Corequisite: BI-326. Prerequisites: BI-101 or BI-105 and Junior or Senior standing.

BI-326   Plant Ecology Lab (Variable; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; N) The first 10 weeks are devoted to laboratory work on the identification of the local entophyte flora. Students are required to make a personal collection representing a minimum of 8 families and are expected to become proficient in using a scientific manual. During the 5th and 6th week there is a mandatory all day field trip to collect forest data. An extensive paper on forest succession will be due bysemester's end. Corequisite: BI-325. Prerequisite: BI-101 or BI-105.

BI-327   Botany (Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N) This course will provide an in-depth examination of the biology of plants. In lecture and lab we will examine plant reproduction and development, morphology and physiology, evolution and biodiversity, and ecology and conservation. Particular attention will be paid to the aspects of plant biology that are unique to this branch of life and/or are of critical importance to human or other biotic interactions (e.g. photosynthesis, pollination, agriculture, etc.). Prerequisites: BI105. Note: A special course fee is applied.

BI-331   Molecular Microbiology (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N,CTGES) Focuses on the structure, function, growth, genetics and ecology of viral, bacterial, and fungal microorganisms. Basic concepts are emphasized and topics important to the quality of human life are examined. Corequisite: BI332. Prerequisites: BI207 and Jr. or Sr. standing.

BI-331CW   Microbiology II (Fall; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N,CW) Focuses on the structure, function, growth, genetics and ecology of viral, bacterial, and fungal microorganisms. Basic concepts are emphasized and topics important to the quality of human life are examined. Corequisite: BI332. Prerequisites: BI207 and Jr. or Sr. standing.

BI-332   Molecular Microbiology Lab (Fall; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; N) Presents procedures and experiments which demonstrate basic micro-biological concepts and techniques. Illustrates and augments the content of the lecture. Note: A special fee is assessed. Corequisite: BI331.

BI-333   Plant Diversity (Fall; Even Years; 4.00 Credits; N) This course explores the diversity of plants through the scientific field of plant systematics, and in particular, through the the practice of plant taxonomy: the description, identification, naming, and classification of plants. We will focus our attention on studying and identifying the regional flora as well as the major vascular plant families. This will be done through a combination of field and literature study. Pre-Req: BI-101 or BI-105.

BI-337   Comparative & Evolutionary Psych (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; CS,N,S) (see PY 337)

BI-339   Organic Evolution (Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; N) Presents the theory and facts of organic revolution through a review of modern and historical research on the subject. Major topics include population genetics, adaptations, evolutionary ecology, systematics, the fossil record, molecular evolution, ontogeny and phylogeny, macroevolution, co-evolution, human evolution, and sociobiology. Prerequisite: BI-101 or BI-105.

BI-339CW   Organic Evolution (Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N,CW) Presents the theory and facts of organic revolution through a review of modern and historical research on the subject. Major topics include population genetics, adaptations, evolutionary ecology, systematics, the fossil record, molecular evolution, ontogeny and phylogeny, macroevolution, co-evolution, human evolution, and sociobiology. This course is the CW version of BI339. In addition to the topic of Evolution, students will receive instruction related to writing in the biological sciences and will be required to produce a well-researched paper on a topic in evolution. Prerequisites: BI207 or BI300 or permission of instructor.

BI-340   Medical Microbiology (Fall; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N) A lecture and lab course focusing on the biology of microorganisms and microbial interactions with humans. Foundational concepts of microbial cell structure, diversity, metabolism, genetics and impacts on humans are discussed along with medical, biotechnical, and environmental aspects of microbiology. Lab provides hands-on experiences with microbiological techniques and handling microorganisms safely and aseptically. Note: A special fee is assessed. Prerequisite: BI-102 or BI-106, and CH-144.

BI-350   Invertebrate Zoology (Fall; Odd Years; 2.00 Credits; N) Focuses on the organizational plan, behavioral and ecological adaptation, diversity and economic importance of representative members of the major invertebrate phyla. Corequisite: BI351. Prerequisite: BI105 and BI121.

BI-351   Invertebrate Zoology Lab (Fall; Odd Years; 2.00 Credits; N) Illustrates and augments the content and concepts of the lecture through direct observation and/or dissection of selected representative organisms. Corequisite: BI350.

BI-360   Vertebrate Zoology (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) Focuses on the vertebrate animals of the Eastern United States. Collection, taxonomic identification and natural history are emphasized. Prerequisite: BI-101 or BI-105.

BI-361   Vertebrate Zoology Lab (Fall; Yearly; 2.00 Credits; N) Frequent field trips, for observation and specimen collection are followed by exercises in identification, specimen preparation, and museum techniques to illustrate and augment the concepts and content of the lecture. Note: A special fee is assessed and one optional field trip requires an additional fee. Corequisite: BI360.

BI-362   Animal Behavior (Fall; Variable; 4.00 Credits; N) Behavior is a result of the nervous system interacting with the environment. Animal Behavior will explore the proximate and ultimate causes of behavior. Special attention will be paid to the role and function of the nervous system in behavior as well as the interplay between genetics and the environment. The lab portion of the course is a co-requisite and will explore basic experimental design for studying animal behavior in the lab and in the field. Pre-Req: BI-101 or BI-105.

BI-367   Comparative Anatomy (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) A study of the structural organization of the human body organized around the major body systems with an emphasis on structure function relationships. To gain deeper understanding of structure function relationships, we will study human anatomy in relation to our position within the vertebrate lineage, comparing human anatomical features with those of other vertebrates. Prerequisites: BI-101 or BI-105 and BI-102 or BI-106. Corequisite: BI-368.

BI-368   Comp Anatomy Laboratory (Fall; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; N) Provides additional content to support the lecture using human models, online resources and dissection of selected representative vertebrates with an emphasis on amniote, mammalian and human anatomy. Note: A special fee is assessed. Corequisite: BI367.

BI-370   Herpetology (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; N) This course presents the biology of amphibians and reptiles from an evolutionary, anatomical and ecological perspective. Phylogenetic diversity of modern taxa will be presented, focusing on North American groups. Instruction will be in the form of lectures, discussions, laboratory activities and field trips to observe local herpetological species. Prerequisites: BI105. Note: A special course fee will be applied.

BI-380   Biology Research Methods (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N,CW,CTGES) Offered in multiple sections by faculty members in the Biology department for students interested in learning to conduct meaningful and responsible research. Students enroll in a section aligned with their research interest to generate novel data, while mastering the important components of research common to each of the diverse areas of Biology. Pre-Reqs: BI-101 or BI-105; sophomore, junior, or senior standing; instructor permission.

BI-389   Biology Research Seminar (Fall; Yearly; 1.00 Credit) Lectures, discussions and student exercises covering such topics as ethics in research, writing effective research proposals and the effective written and oral communication of research results. Professional research and educational societies, government and private funding of research in the United States and other countries and career opportunities will also be discussed. Prerequisites: BI289. Corequisites: BI489. Graded S (satisfactory) or U (unsatisfactory).

BI-399   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Offered at the discretion of the department to qualified students. Topic titles may vary from semester to semester and more than one may be offered per semester. Note: Students may take each ST: course for credit and a special fee is assessed. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor, or as indicated.

BI-400   Environmental Genomics (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N) This course will utilize Microbial Community Analysis leveraging high-throughput sequencing technology to identify the microbes present in naturally occurring or human-made ecosystems. Students will learn both molecular and bioinformatics skill sets, as well as microbial ecology principles throughout this course. Pre-Reqs: BI-102 or BI-106, CH-144, CH-145.

BI-405   Bioinformatics Fundamentals (Variable; 4.00 Credits; N,CTGES) Bioinformatics is the science of collecting and analyzing complex biological data. It is an interdisciplinary field that develops and applies methods and software tools for understanding biological data. Prerequisites: BI-101 or BI-105, BI-102 or BI-121, CH-142, CH-143, CH-144, and CH-145.

BI-417   Reproductive Biology (Fall; Even Years; 3.00 Credits; N) This course examines reproductive biology by integrating aspects of development, anatomy, cell biology, and hormone physiology with the behavior and ecology of vertebrates. Pre-Req: BI-101 or BI-105.

BI-417CW   Reproductive Biology (Fall; Even Years; 4.00 Credits; N,CW) This course examines reproductive biology by integrating aspects of development, anatomy, cell biology, and hormone physiology with the behavior and ecology of vertebrates. Prerequisites: BI06.

BI-432   Environmental Toxicology (Spring; Even Years; 3.00 Credits; N) Broadly integrative in nature, this class compounds in environmental systems and focuses on the potential for deleterious consequences in wildlife species and humans. Examines aspects of chemistry, cell biology, and ecology in considering environmental contamination. Instruction includes lectures and student presentations/writing exercises. Prerequisites: Take 2 courses from BI-101 or BI-105 or CH-142 or ESS-100, or have permission from the instructor.

BI-432CW   Environmental Toxicology (Spring; Even Years; 4.00 Credits; N,CW) Broadly integrative in nature, this class examines the fate and actions of xenobiotic compounds in environmental systems and focuses on the potential for deleterious consequences in wildlife species and humans. Examines aspects of chemistry, cell biology and ecology in considering environmental contamination. Instruction includes lectures and student presentations/writing exercises. Prerequisites: Take 2 courses from BI-105 or CH-142 or ESS-100 and permission of the instructor.

BI-444   Immunology (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N) Covers the properties of antigens, antibodies and complement, humoral and cell-mediated immunological systems, antigen-antibody interactions and hypersensitivity reactions. Pre-Req: BI-102 or BI-106; CH-312 or CH-342.

BI-450   Neurobiology (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) Neurobiology is a lecture course that addresses concepts ranging from the molecular biology of ion channels to signal integration and behavior. This course is experimentally based and will focus on the biophysics, chemistry, and mechanisms of signal production and integration in the nervous system. Particular attention will be paid to sensory systems and memory consolidation. In addition to lecture exams, students will gain valuable experience in scientific writing through the preparation of a review paper on a neurobiological topic of their choosing. Pre-Req: Take one of the following courses: BI-101 or BI-105 or CH-142 or PY-101 or PC-200 or PC-202 or PC-204.

BI-450CW   Neurobiology (Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N,CW) Neurobiology (W) is a lecture course that addresses concepts ranging from the molecular biology of ion channels to signal integration and behavior combined with a supplemental series of lectures to develop the students writing skills in Biology. This course is experimentally based and will focus on the biophysics, chemistry, and mechanisms of signal production and integration in the nervous system. Particular attention will be paid to sensory systems and memory consolidation. In addition to lecture exams, students will gain valuable experience in scientific writing through the preparation of a review paper on a neurobiological topic of their choosing. Pre-Req: Take one of the following courses: Take BI-101, BI-105, CH-142, PY-101, PC-200, PC-202, or PC-204.

BI-460   Genetic Analysis (Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; N) Topics covered will include basic and advanced topics in transmission, quantitative and population genetics, with emphasis on analysis. the methods that modern researchers use to discover the molecular basis of adaptive or disease traits and how they are transmitted over generations in model and non-model species. Case studies will be used to challenge students' understanding of conceptual material in context. Students will present an article from the primary literature and present on a topic of their choice. This class assumes students enter with a basic understanding of Molecular and Mendelian Genetics. Prereqs: BI-101 or 105, and BI-102 or 106.

BI-461   The Art & Science of Brewing (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) This is a synoptic study of brewing, integrating the science, technology, and history while considering all of the many steps in the brewing process including, barley and malting, yeast biology, brewing herbs mashing, conditioning and beer styles. NOTE: Students must be 21 years of age by the start date of the course. Students will be expected to have completed one semester each of biology and chemistry and two semesters of laboratory work in the natural sciences.

BI-481   Medical Genomics Research Methods (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N) This class will provide training in advanced statistical and/or informatics tools. Bioinformatics skills will be related to variant characterization and/or comparison of eukaryotic genomes and populations. The research project will involve working with scientist/MD Dr. Holmes Morton on medical research problems affecting marginalized Amish and Mennonite populations in Kish Valley. Pre-Req: BI-305 or BI-400 or BI-460 or permission of instructor.

BI-489   Biology Research (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00-6.00 Credits; N) Individual research projects directed by faculty members based on proposals submitted in BI 389, Biology Research Seminar. Attendance at a departmental journal club is expected. Presentation at a professional meeting is encouraged. May be repeated for up to 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

BI-489CS   Biology Research (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00-6.00 Credits; N,CS) Individual research projects directed by faculty members based on proposals submitted in BI 389, Biology Research Seminar. Attendance at a departmental journal club is expected. Presentation at a professional meeting is encouraged. May be repeated for up to 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

BI-490   Biology Internship (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 2.00-9.00 Credits; N) Note: May be repeated up to a total of 9 hours of credit. Corequisite: BI 495. Prerequisite: permission and Jr. or Sr. standing.

BI-495   Internship Seminar (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 2.00-6.00 Credits; N) Requires students to reflect on the experience and/or pursue relevant research. Corequisite: BI 490. Prerequisite: Permission

BI-499   Senior Thesis (Either Semester; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N,CW) This course is the culmination of an individual research project initiated in BI 489. Students will complete their projects by writing a paper describing their research. These papers will be of significant length and contain full documentation of the student's original research. The thesis will be presented orally to faculty and students at the yearly campus wide Juniata Student Research Symposium. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

BI-516   Molecular & Cellular Biology (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits) A comprehensive approach to the study of cells, with emphasis on molecular techniques and understanding the primary literature. Analysis of the cell at the molecular level emphasizes a unity in the principles by which cells function. PRE-REQ: BS degree in molecular biology, biochemistry or the permission of the instructor.

BI-TUT   Biology Teaching Assistant (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits)

Chemistry

Department Website:

https://www.juniata.edu/academics/departments/chemistry/

Faculty:

Background Information:

 

The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry has a long-standing reputation for excellence in the undergraduate training of professional scientists. We are proud that our students go on to work in the chemical and biotech industries, are regularly accepted into top graduate programs and medical schools, and have made significant contributions to several scientific fields. The chemistry department has been accredited by the American Chemical Society since 1936 and is proud to count four chemistry graduates who are members of the National Academy of Sciences. Our students are encouraged to develop interests across disciplines, especially given the increasing demand for scientists with broad expertise.

Special programs, facilities, or equipment:

Specific department policy:

Awarding credit for AP exam scores: A student with an AP score of 4 or 5 will receive 3 Natural Science credits, but is not waived from taking Chemistry prerequisites.

Programs of Emphasis:

Examples of Individualized Programs of Emphasis:

Internship/Research Experiences:

Courses:

CH-142   Integrated Chemistry Principles I (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) An introduction to the principles of chemistry, this course begins a two semester sequence that integrates information from all aspects of chemistry while focusing on the core principles of the relationships between energy, the structure of atoms and molecules, and atomic and molecular properties and reactivity. Topics include energy, reactions, atomic structure, elemental properties, bonding, and molecular properties. Corequisite CH143.

CH-143   Integrated Chem Principles I Lab (Variable; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; N,QS) This semester will focus on learning good laboratory practices, primarily through the quantitative analysis of compounds. The quantitative analysis of materials and an understanding of reproducibility and bias are relevant to many fields, including medical analysis or the analysis of contaminants in the environment. This course will also teach you how to keep an excellent laboratory notebook, identify safety hazards in the lab, and complete data analysis and graphing in Excel. All of these tools will serve you well in a variety of careers. CH142 is a corequisite of this course. A lab fee is associated with this course.

CH-144   Integrated Chemistry Principles II (Either Semester; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) An introduction to the principles of chemistry, this course completes a two semester sequence that integrates information from all aspects of chemistry while focusing on the core principles of the relationships between energy, the structure of atoms and molecules, and atomic and molecular properties and reactivity. Topics include thermodynamics, equilibrium reactions, acid/base and redox reactions, kinetics and nuclear reactions. Prerequisite: CH-142.

CH-145   Integrated Chemistry Principles II Lab (Either Semester; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; N,QS) This semester will focus on learning good laboratory practices, primarily through the quantitative analysis of compounds. The quantitative analysis of materials and an understanding of reproducibility and bias are relevant to many fields, including medical analysis or the analysis of contaminants in the environment. This course will also teach you how to keep an excellent laboratory notebook, identify safety hazards in the lab, and complete data analysis and graphing in Excel. All of these tools will serve you well in a variety of careers. Prerequisite: CH-143. A lab fee is associated with this course.

CH-199   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows the department to offer special topics not normally offered. Departments may offer more than one special topic. Prerequisites vary with topic.

CH-210   Chemistry and Biochemistry Seminar (Variable; Yearly; 1.00 Credit) This course is designed to begin the journey for from students of science to citizens of the scientific community. During the semester speakers will present topics which will help inform the students about the opportunities for research and collaboration. Additionally, an emphasis will be made on post-graduation career opportunities and planning. Must have at least sophomore standing and have a POE in Chemistry, Biochemistry or Chemistry Secondary Education.

CH-222   Inorganic Chemistry (Spring; All Years; 4.00 Credits; N) CH 222 is a one-semester course of Inorganic Chemistry that builds on chemistry knowledge acquired in CH 142 (Integrated Chemistry Principles I). The Inorganic Chemistry course is designed for all students having " chemistry " in their POE title but it will serve any student who wants to learn about " chemistry of elements " because it covers chemistry of all elements from the periodic table with exception of organic carbon chemistry. The class also introduces students to theoretical concepts such as molecular symmetry, molecular spectroscopy, and theory of complexes. Part of the class is a 4-hour laboratory session which introduces students into synthetic inorganic chemistry and characterization of inorganic compounds. Syntheses, reactivity, and characterization of main group element compounds and transition metals will be practiced. Pre-Req: CH-142 and CH-143. Pre-Req or Co-Req: CH-144 and CH-145.

CH-232   Organic Chemistry I (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) Students enrolled in CH-242 will become familiar with the fundamental concepts and nomenclature needed to understand and communicate organic chemistry. The course is further designed to teach the structure-function relationships that exist across many classes of organic and bio-organic systems, and therefore provide a foundation for further study in chemistry, biochemistry, biology, and medicine. Prerequisite: CH-144; Corequisite: CH-233.

CH-233   Organic Chemistry I Lab (Variable; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; N) This course will utilize techniques learned in CH-145 and carry out experiments illustrative of concepts learned in CH-232. The course will focus on spectroscopy, organic laboratory techniques and reactions, and compound characterization. This course will also reinforce good record-keeping skills continue to stress safe lab practices. A lab fee is associated with this course. Pre-Req: CH-145. Pre- or Co-Req: CH-232.

CH-247   Bioanalytical Chemistry (Variable; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; N,QS) Exploration of experimental techniques and topics that are pertinent to the careful analytical evaluation of biologically relevant chemistry. Pre-Req: Junior or senior class standing.

CH-252   Analytical Chemistry (Spring; Odd Years; 4.00 Credits; N,QS) This course focuses on the methods that chemists use to identify and quantify compounds of interest and measure their physical properties. Classroom and laboratory time will be spent considering experimental design, measurement techniques, and validation of results in a variety of chemical contexts. Prerequisites: CH-144 and CH-145. Note: A special lab fee is assessed.

CH-299   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows the department to teach special topics not normally offered. Departments may offer more than one special topic. Prerequisites vary with topic.

CH-312   Biochemistry (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) The fourth semester of the introductory Chemistry series, this course pulls content from chemistry, biology, mathematics, and history to provide an integrated view of biochemistry. Topics include the use of thermodynamics, equilibrium, non-covalent interactions, kinetics, separations, biomolecular structure, and genetics to probe and explain biological phenomenon. Prerequisites: Take BI-102 or BI-106 (or have instructor's permission) and take CH-232 or CH-242.

CH-322   Scientific Glassblowing (Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit) Course introduces the construction and repair of glassware for scientific purposes. The course starts with a discussion of the properties of glass relevant to glass working. Students then obtain practice in fundamental manipulations; straight, tee, and ring seals. This is followed by more complicated projects utilizing several seals such as condensers. Finally, students choose among a number of advanced topics such as lathe use, vacuum rack construction, and artistic creations. Note: A special course fee is assessed. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing or permission of the instructor.

CH-332   Organic Chemistry II (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N) A continuation of the study of organic chemistry begun in CH-232 and CH-233. Special emphasis is placed on advanced aspects of structure and reactivity, with careful attention to the methodology and tools of synthesis. Topics include aromatic chemistry, enolate chemistry, pericyclic reactions, retrosynthetic analysis and various aspects of stereoselectivity. Prerequisites: Take CH-232/233 or CH-242/243.

CH-340   Wine Chemistry (Variable; Variable; 2.00 Credits; N) This is a 2-credit course dealing with the theoretical study (1 credit) of chemical processes that are involved in wine formation and that influence appearance, flavor, and aroma of different wines including such topics as barrel aging and corkage, wine and health, wine faults, and wine laboratory practices and procedures associated with vineyard to bottling lifecycle of wine. An intensive hands-on component (4 hours a week) enabling authentic experience of wine-grapes growing, wine making and wine tasting is part of the course (second credit). Prerequisites: 2 semesters of college Chemistry or permission of the instructor. Must be 21 years of age or older.

CH-352   Physical Chemistry I (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) In this course students will investigate the physical characteristics and interactions of matter. Topics covered will include thermodynamics, kinetics, quantum mechanics, and molecular spectroscopy within the contexts of chemistry and biochemistry. In addition, molecular modeling techniques will be briefly introduced. Prerequisites: Take CH-144, MA-130, and either PC-200 or PC-202.

CH-353   Physical Chemistry Laboratory (Variable; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; N,Q,CW) In this course, students will gain hands-on practice at obtaining data pertinent to physical chemistry through laboratory experiments. Experiments will be performed that highlight material from Physical Chemistry I (CH-352). A significant component of each lab will involve molecular modeling. Co-requisite: CH-352.

CH-354   Physical Chemistry II (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) In this course students will advance their understanding of physical chemistry concepts through primary literature sources and discussion. The course will focus on literature from the beginnings of thermodynamics and quantum mechanics as well as more modern research. Prerequisites: Take CH-352, MA-230, and either PC-201 or PC-203.

CH-362   Chemical Synthesis (Fall; Yearly; 2.00 Credits; N,CW) CH-362 is an advanced laboratory-based organic and organometallic synthesis class. Through the completion of two to three multi-component projects, students will gain a better understanding of the requirements of advanced laboratory research and will learn how to communicate as organic chemists. Overall, the course is designed to help students mature into skilled citizens of the scientific community. Prerequisite: CH-232.

CH-372   Instrumental Methods (Fall; Odd Years; 3.00 Credits; N) The primary tools that chemists use to characterize chemical species involve increasingly complex instrumentation. We will explore the principles and methodology of various types of instrumental methods and will analyze data resulting from these techniques. Prerequisite: CH-232 or CH-242.

CH-385   Advanced Chemistry Lab (Variable; Yearly; 2.00 Credits) This course is a culmination or capstone of your laboratory experiences. You will draw upon your knowledge and experience from previous classes to identify a chemistry related question, design experimental work, and report your findings. The focus of each semester will vary depending on the specific instructors. Prereqs: CH-222, CH-232, CH-252, CH-312, and CH-352, plus junior or senior standing.

CH-399   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Advanced specialized topics in chemistry and related areas. Topic titles may vary from semester to semester. Note: abbreviated ST: (title); students may take more than one " ST: " course for credit. Offered at the discretion of the department to qualified students.

CH-401   Advanced Organic Chemistry (Either Semester; Variable; 3.00 Credits; N) Discusses selected topics in organic chemistry with emphasis on general principles, including chemical bonding. Recent literature is used. Prerequisite: CH-332 or CH-262.

CH-406   Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (Either Semester; Variable; 3.00 Credits; N) Completes an introductory study of inorganic chemistry at an undergraduate level. Theoretical topics, like electronic structure (molecular orbital theory), molecular symmetry, theories about complexes, reaction mechanisms of complexes, catalysis, introduction to solid state chemistry, and a role of metals in life processes are covered. Students will become familiar with inorganic chemistry journals, SciFinder and the Cambridge Structural Database. Prerequisites: CH-222 and CH-352.

CH-418   Advanced Biochemistry (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) Advanced Biochemistry is the third semester of the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (BMB) curriculum for Biochemistry POEs, expanding the content of the previous two semesters. Stressing techniques and instrumentation, the course is comprised of student-led learning modules, which are created around the primary literature with the help of the instructor. Topics may include metabolism, systems biology, or genomics. Prerequisite: CH-312 or CH-342.

CH-488   Chemistry & Biochemistry Capstone I (Variable; Yearly; 0.00 Credits) This course is a partner course to CH-489 Chemistry and Biochemistry Capstone II. This course is a non-credit-bearing course to mark the submission of Capstone Portfolio Contribution #1, which demonstrates a student's analytic and/or creative thinking and depth of knowledge in an academic field. Requires senior standing.

CH-489   Chemistry & Biochemistry Capstone II (Variable; Yearly; 1.00 Credit) This course is a partner course to CH-488 Chemistry and Biochemistry Capstone I. In this course, students will reflect on the totality of their chemistry or biochemistry education and relate it to their broader Juniata education. Co-Req: CH-488 and senior standing.

CH-490   Chemistry Internship (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 2.00-9.00 Credits; N) See the chapter, " Special Programs " under Internships in the catalog. Note: May be repeated up to a total of 9 hours of credit. Corequisite: CH495. Prerequisite: Permission and Jr. or Sr. standing.

CH-493   Senior Thesis (Spring; Yearly; 2.00 Credits; CW) Designed for students who are carrying out senior research; students will write a senior thesis describing their work, part of the requirements for graduating with a distinction in chemistry, and prepare an oral presentation of their work. Corequisite: CH-494

CH-494   Chemistry Research (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00-4.00 Credits; N) Individual research projects directed by faculty members. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

CH-495   Chemistry Research/Sem. (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 2.00-6.00 Credits; N) Requires students to reflect on the internship experience and /or pursue research related to the placement. Corequisite: CH 490. Prerequisite: permission.

CH-499   Chemistry Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits; N) Allows departments to offer topics not normally taught. Prerequisites and corequisites vary by title.

CH-TUT   Chemistry Teaching Assistant (Variable; Variable; 0.00-4.00 Credits) See catalog.

Communication and Theatre Arts

Department Website:

Faculty:

Learning Outcomes:

 

The Department of Communication and Theatre Arts offers a diversity of educational experiences in language, communication, media, and the performing arts. Our learning outcomes are to think clearly and creatively, write and speak persuasively, read with intelligence and imagination, and gain insight into audiences. Such skills and knowledge enable students to pursue a wide variety of exciting career paths and graduate study.

Special programs, facilities, publication or equipment:

Programs of Emphasis:

Individualized Programs of Emphasis:

Secondary Emphasis:

Internship/Research Experiences:

Courses:

THE COMMUNICATION CORE:
CM 101 First Year Seminar

CM 130 Introduction to Human Communication 
CM 132 Message Analysis 
CM 133 Mass Media and Society

CM-130   Introduction to Human Communication (Either Semester; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Surveys the fundamental tenets of human communication through application. This course is concerned with how and why we speak, listen, respond, and strategize through the uses of verbal and nonverbal symbol systems.

CM-132   Message Analysis (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; H,CS,WK-HT) The study of rhetoric investigates the art of persuasion. The course introduces the basic rhetorical concepts and language we need to make sense of the sea of messages we swim in. The course aims to sharpen your ability to reason, reflect, send, perceive and discern messages in a variety of contexts. Upon completion of this course, students understand several humanistic perspectives toward communication and are able to apply the basic tools of rhetorical analysis. Students have an increased awareness of the ways in which our symbolic behaviors shape our social lives. Pre-Req or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

CM-133   Mass Media and Society (Either Semester; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; H,CS,WK-HT) This course provides an orientation to media industries, the academic field of media research, and the influence of media on our politics, society, and everyday lives. Through a broad survey of media technology, theory, issues, and policy, it offers a media literacy framework for critically evaluating media use and content, and positions you as a critical consumer, scholar, and citizen.Pre-Req or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

CM-199   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows departments to offer special topics not normally offered. Departments may offer more than one special topic. Prerequisites vary by topic.

CM-200   Art of Public Speaking (Either Semester; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; CS,H) Seeks to develop and improve fundamental principles and methods of selecting, organizing, developing, and communicating a line of reasoning and evidence for constructive influence in speaking situations. Students make three formal presentations, analyze messages, and improve their listening skills. Prerequisites: Sophomore, Junior, or Senior standing.

CM-210   Race and Language in the United States (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; SW-US) This class examines racism as a cultural system observed through our beliefs and practices about spoken English. The goal of the course is to develop an understanding of how linguistic prejudice contributes to the cultural programs of racism in the US.

CM-214   Cinderella (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; CA,H) Surveys the historical and cultural origins and pathways of the Cinderella story. Students use folk-tale research to identify the thematic content of the Cinderella story, explore its reach, and understand its ubiquity in American popular culture. The course includes a major project for which students conduct library research in order to write an original Cinderella based in a culture for which we do not have an extant copy. Prerequisites: FYC101, EN110, or EN109.

CM-220   Group Communication (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H,CS,SW-LE) This course is designed to improve communication in small-group task and problem-solving situations. We will explore ways of developing communication strategies for effective participation in groups. Students will gain practical experience using these skills and theories by working as a group to address the needs of a community partner. Pre-Req: CM-130. Pre- or Co-Req: Take FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

CM-230   Interpersonal Communication (Either Semester; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; H,CS) Introduces students to the various theories and styles of one-on-one communication. It emphasizes the transactional approach in the study of the communication process as it occurs in interpersonal relationships. It explores interaction as a way by which we come to know ourselves and each other. Pre-Reqs: CM-130 is recommended to be taken prior to this course, but not required.

CM-245   Photojournalism: the Ethics of Seeing (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; F,H,SW-ER) This introductory course explores the ethical responsibility in photojournalism. We all take pictures and know of photos that have changed us and changed the world. What are the ethics of seeing - a technical term which questions point of view and the understanding of the cultures and social issues portrayed. Pre-req or co-req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109

CM-250   LEAD:Listen & Empath Advocacy Diversity (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; H) Through the creative sharing of stories, the ontology of listening, reflective readings, writings and conversation we will explore diversity and multicultural communication as unfolding dimensions of our intersectionality, especially as it relates to leadership.

CM-261   Communication Studies Abroad I (Spring; Variable; 2.00 Credits; I,H,SW-GE) Students will spend the spring semester preparing for a trip abroad to visit a partner institution. Students will cover topics in the field of Communication such as intercultural and group communication and learn about the target country/culture through film, guest speakers, news, and readings. During the summer term, we will travel to the country for two weeks. Students must take both CM-261 and CM-262. NOTE: The total fee for the experience is split between the two courses, with half on the spring semester billing and the other half on the summer term billing.

CM-262   Communication Studies Abroad II (Summer; Variable; 1.00 Credit; I,H,SW-GE) Students will spend the spring semester preparing for a trip abroad to visit a partner institution. Students will cover topics in the field of Communication such as intercultural and group communication, and learn about the target country/culture through film, guest speakers, news, and readings. During Summer Term, we will travel to the country for two weeks. Prereq: CM-261. NOTE: The total fee for the experience is split between CM-261 and CM-262, with half on the spring semester billing and the other half on the summer term billing.

CM-289   Communication Practicum (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00-2.00 Credits; F,H) A Practicum in Communication encourage students to: (1) develop skills in analyzing and delivering public presentations; (2) assess, interpret and analyze messages data among diverse audiences; (3) understand speech communication in a variety of contexts; (4) appreciate public address from a historic perspective; and (5) participate actively in the communication field. This course is repeatable up to 4 credits.

CM-290   The Metaverse (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; H,CW,CS) This introductory course focuses on how information technologies shape the way we think and organize ourselves. In studying the technology of the book, social media and the metaverse, students explore change and technology as central to the decision making of leaders. Prerequisites: CM133 or IT110 or IT111.

CM-299   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows departments to offer special topics not normally offered. Departments may offer more than one special topic. Prerequisites vary by topic.

CM-300   Professional Presentations (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; CS,H) Designed for students to improve and polish their speaking skills for effective presentations in professional settings. It is a performance course with emphasis placed on speech structure, audience adaptation, style of presentation (oral report and manuscript reading), with the use of PowerPoint and/or Prez1. Video is used to help speakers understand the relationship between their speaking behaviors and responses of listeners. Prerequisites: CM200.

CM-310   Understanding Health Inequity (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S,WK-SI) In this class, students will learn how to read, understand, and conduct social research about individuals and systems that create disparity in health care and outcomes. The research that we will read and learn to conduct will rely on texts and stories rather than numbers and statistics. The class will address questions such as: what conditions are present that allow some populations greater access to health care than others? What social problems underlie the disparities in health outcomes for women, people of color, and people from low-income backgrounds. Students will gather and analyze their own research data. Pre-Req or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109

CM-330   Media Analysis (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; H,CW,CS) Designed to explore analytical approaches applied to a variety of media, including advertising, television sitcoms, new shows, propaganda, film, music and architecture, in order to ascertain the persuasive messages inherent in each artifact. By examining the rhetorical choices revealed by each method of criticism, we can better understand the structure of message design, the medium and in a larger sense the cultural values that shape both. Prerequisites: CM132 or CM133.

CM-340   Intercultural Communication (Either Semester; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; H,I) This course examines symbolic patterns of communication as they relate to issues of diversity. Interactive skills needed to open channels of communication between and among people of diverse backgrounds are analyzed and developed. A multi-cultural approach to the study of human communication serves as a basis for exploring issues of diversity that include but are not limited to race, gender, class, ability, orientation, religion and ethnicity. Prerequisite: CM230.

CM-365   Organizational Communication (Either Semester; Variable; 3.00 Credits; H,S,CW) Examines the strategic uses of communication by individuals in organizations and by organizations as a whole in the pursuit of organizational goals. Provides students with a theoretical vocabulary to analyze communication in organizational settings in order to understand processes such as social networks, leadership, and power. Focuses on personal and organizational ethics in work place communication. Prerequisites: CM130 and CM230 and CM220.

CM-399   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits; H) Allows departments to offer special topics not normally offered. Departments may offer more than one special topic. Prerequisites vary by topic.

CM-400   Communication Philosophy (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; H,CS) Topics in communication philosophy examine the relationship between thoughts, words, and actions. The study of rhetoric will be the basis for each course as it applies to specific contexts: health care, public discourse,diversity, conflicts and debates, political campaigns, and family dynamics. Prerequisites: CM130 and CM230.

CM-400A   Health Communication (Spring; Odd Years; 3.00 Credits; H) Explores how communication functions to promote health, the important role of information in health care, the development of communication campaigns to promote health awareness, alternative and multicultural approaches to health care, the promotion of ethical health communication, and the use of new health communication technologies. Prerequisites: CM130 and CM230.

CM-400B   Storytelling (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; H,CS) This performance course gives students the opportunity to examine the oral traditions of the language through the art of reading, writing, listening, watching and telling stories. Stories are at the heart of the human experience. They form the foundation for many academic disciplines. Stories help us to understand our own beliefs, values traditions and civilities. This course aims to strengthen our appreciation and understanding of storytelling, old and new.

CM-400C   Advanced Interpersonal Communication (Fall; Variable; 3.00 Credits; H,CS) This course develops the theories and applications of interpersonal communication by focusing on various perspectives of communication with creativity, conflict in interpersonal relationships, listening and language appreciation. Students are expected to analyze and discuss specific conversational patterns that are both experienced and observed. How these patterns form and transform the conversational dynamic of an interpersonal relationship is explored. Prerequisites: CM130 and CM230.

CM-400D   Rhetoric of Coming Out (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; H) This course aims to explore diverse uses of rhetoric applicable to the coming out process. Cultural, social, political, physical, institutional, and financial constructs of the closet are studied in an effort to understand and appreciate the coming out process. Rhetorical constraints, functions, and strategies involved in the construction and deconstruction of the closet, both perceived and real, and of coming out the closet are illuminated. While various perspectives of rhetoric are covered, a classical perspective is most closely examined and applied.

CM-400F   Rhetoric of Spirituality (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; H) This course invites students to discover value and meaning in the rhetoric used to describe and define God. Who is and what is God? How do we come to learn about and experience divinity? What role does language play relevant to divinity? Specifically, we will be illuminating epideictic rhetoric and how it functions to establish and sustain faith-based communities. Rhetorical analyses and discussions will guide our efforts to question foundational assumptions embedded in religious values. Such questioning helps to strengthen understandings of spirituality and of the divine.

CM-401   Senior Seminar (Fall; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; H) Senior Seminar in Communication is an opportunity to refine your understanding of your communication POE and experiences and their application to the professional world of business or graduate school. Students will reflect on their communication expertise, prepare resumes and interwiewing techniques, network with alums in communication, and communicate their expertise. This course intends to make explicit the strong knowledge base acquired in a Communication POE and to explore the opportunities available in the field of communication. Prerequisites: Senior standing.

CM-405A   Women, Work & Identity (Fall; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S) Women. Work. Identity. These three words are related in a complex web that many of us struggle to untangle for our entire working lives. In this course, we identify and name the components of the relationships among these words--all in the context of the unique perspective that the communication discipline offers. Prerequisites: CM130 or CM230 or CM220 or CM365 or permission of the instructor.

CM-420A   Hollywood Films (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; H,CW) In this course we explore one visual medium: film. Hollywood film is understood as mainstream media which is meant for a general audience and with strong box office constraints. A rhetorical perspective insists on the presence of an audience which is not necessarily of interest in all types of film study but will be crucial in our discussions. We relate theories, methods of production, and criticism to our work but it is not limited to them. This course is an opportunity for students to explore what mainstream films mean and why they are such an important cultural phenomenon. Prerequisites: CM132 or CM133.

CM-420B   Media Violence (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; H,CW) This media studies course introduces students to basic issues and research surrounding media violence. We take a hard look at media violence and its scholarly research in order to understand the intricacies of both our fascination and repulsion for all of the media's manifestations of violence. Cross-listed in Communication and Peace and Conflicts Studies, this course asks students to critically analyze media violence while integrating current media research into our understanding of violence as a presence in our lives and what we can or should do about it. Prerequisites: CM132 or CM133.

CM-420C   Digital Media Studies (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; H) We know we can connect with a friend studying abroad on a 24/7 basis and when we do research on the WWW, the materials, location, time and distance are irrelevant. This course lets us extend our vision to a serious study of how global business, politics and social relations are changing by these various processes of instant connection and perpetual contact. Digital Media are at the heart of this revolution in communication. Necessarily we want to pay attention to the digital divide and the continuities of our lives as these communication changes occur. In looking at the big picture, the scope of these changes is necessarily global, challenging, complex and fast. Hang on to your seats!! Prerequisites: CM132 or CM133.

CM-420D   Truth and Lying (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; H,CW) This media studies course introduces students to the theories of rhetoric to understand the question, who can we trust? We pay special attention to the classical period of Rhetoric and the Rhetoric of the 20th century. Rhetoric has been transformed through media. Despite these transformations, rhetoric has always been considered of first importance for the ethical practical conduct of our everyday lives. How we present or lives our beliefs, attitudes, and commitments is indeed the concern of when we lie and who we can trust in our personal and public lives. Prerequisites: CM132 or CM133.

CM-420E   Digital Storytelling (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; H,F,CTDH) Digital stories derive their power in weaving images, music, narrative and voice together, and thereby giving deep dimension and vivid color to characters, situations, experiences, and insights. This course offers students the opportunity to experiment with narratives and their visualization using digital media technologies as a vehicle to tell stories creatively with a clear point of view and audience awareness. Prerequisites: CM133 or 1 of the following courses, CM290 or IT110 or AR404.

CM-490   Communication Internship (Variable; Variable; 2.00-9.00 Credits; H) Communication students may apply their acquired skills and knowledge to on-the-job internships for a semester during their junior or senior year for a total of 9 credit hours. Television stations, radio stations, newspapers, magazines, public relations, advertising agencies and human relations in health organizations are all possible placements. You not only work as full-time members of a business team, but also evaluate and document your growth in a work journal and prepare a portfolio of presentations or publications. Corequisite: CM495. Prerequisite: Communication core and Jr. or Sr. standing.

CM-495   Communication Internship Research (Variable; Variable; 2.00-6.00 Credits; H) In addition to the on-the-job experience provided by the internship, students are required to pursue research related to their placement. An in-depth research paper or presentation is completed during the semester. Corequisite: CM490. Prerequisite: Communication core and Jr. or Sr. standing.

CM-497   Honors Seminar (Variable; Variable; 3.00-6.00 Credits; H,CS) Designed to serve as a capstone course for students who emphasize Communication in their POE. The students will be expected to examine communication theories and research methods relevant to a topic, theme, issue, or problem that has served as an area of special interest throughout the previous two years of study. Students must have Senior standing, have a POE in Communication and meet the 3.40 GPA requirements.

CM-498   Honors Research (Either Semester; Yearly; 3.00-6.00 Credits; H,CS) Designed to serve as a capstone course for students who emphasize Communication in their POE. The students will be expected to examine communication theories and research methods relevant to a topic, theme, issue, or problem that has served as an area of special interest throughout the previous two years of study. Students must have Senior standing, have a POE in Communication and meet the 3.40 GPA requirements. Prequisite: CM-497.

CM-499   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows departments to offer special topics not normally offered. Departments may offer more than one special topic. Prerequisites vary by topic.

CM-TUT   Communication Teaching Assistant (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) This tutorial provides a structure for the experience of teaching in Communication and reflection on classroom dynamics.

Theatre Arts

TH-120   Tai Chi, Level I (Variable; Yearly; 1.00 Credit) This course provides an introduction to Tai Chi movement, history, and philosophy. Students will be able to explain the history of Tai Chi, perform a solo Tai Chi sequence, and engage in push-hands with a partner. Tai Chi is useful to the performing artist both in its philosophy and also in cultivation of kinesthetic and energetic awareness of the body. It also promotes mindfulness and wellbeing.

TH-121   Tai Chi, Level 2 (Variable; Variable; 1.00 Credit) This course deepens your understanding of Tai Chi movement, history, and philosophy. Students will deepen their understanding of Tai Chi history, perform a solo Tai Chi sequence, and engage in push-hands with a partner at a much deeper level than Tai Chi 1. Tai Chi is useful to the performing artist both in its philosophy and also in cultivation of kinesthetic and energetic awareness of the body. It also promotes mindfulness and wellbeing. Prerequisite: TH-120 or CONN-234.

TH-123   Jedi Academy (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; F,WK-CE) In Jedi Academy, we will examine the nine major Star Wars films but also some of their historical, philosophical, neurobiology, and creative influences and intersections. We will also train our own bodies, minds, and spirits and search for our own personal definition of health, happiness, and wellbeing. NOTE: This course involves a significant physical strength and condition component. Everything we do in class is scalable and modifiable for all abilities and fitness levels. However, student-athletes must get permission from the Head Coach as activities in this class could lead to over-training. Pre-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109

TH-160   Tai Chi (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 2.00 Credits) This course provides an introduction to Tai Chi movement, history, and philosophy. Students will be able to explain the history of Tai Chi, perform a solo Tai Chi sequence, and engage in push-hands with a partner. Tai Chi is useful to the performing artist both in its philosophy and also in cultivation of kinesthetic and energetic awareness of the body.

TH-161   Play/Making (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; WK-CE,H,F) Compositions are a collaborative way to rehearse a play, build a play, and nurture ensemble. Built off an idea or theme, book or novel, or an existing play, these short theatre pieces can be woven together into a full-length production or simply stand-alone exercises to deepen an artists' understanding of work. We will be building all of our work off of a central idea with multiple source documents with the goal of creating a final, full-length performance piece.

TH-199   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows the department to offer special topics not normally offered. Departments may offer more than one special topic. Prerequisites vary by title.

TH-221   Acting I (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; F,WK-CE) A study of the discipline of acting, including development of concentration methods, creative energy, fine tuning of the vocal and physical instrument and character analysis.

TH-262   Solos (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; F,CW,WK-CE) This course uses playwriting and performance techniques to move from page-to-stage as students create original one-person shows. We will explore a number of different playwriting techniques from self-exploration, interview, and narrative forms. Then we will rehearse and perform the pieces at the end of the semester in a new play festival.

TH-299   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows the department to offer special topics not normally offered. Departments may offer more than one special topic. Prerequisites vary by title.

TH-325   Acting II (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; F,CS) Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to: Meisner-based Practical Aesthetics through script analysis and application to scene work. Develop a deeper confidence in the strength and flexibility of the breath and voice. Collaborate on scene rehearsals with partner in a professional manner Nurture a deeper understanding of her meta-cognition. Integrate strategies for mitigating stress through self-talk, imagery, and meditation. Engender a life-long pursuit of self-improvement and psychophysical mastery. Prerequisite: TH221.

TH-351   Integrated Experience (Fall; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; F) The goal of the integrated experience is to create a space where the student may reflect on her entire curricular and co-curricular experience at Juniata. In discerning how the myriad experiences have impacted and influenced her over the past several years, she will begin to form a narrative of how those experiences have added up to the artist-student she is today and hopes to be tomorrow. She will use this narrative to form a strategic plan for post-graduation activity and, more immediately, a capstone experience that is directly linked to this Integrated Experience. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to: Research possible future opportunities such as grad school, internships, and career paths Map the curricular and co-curricular experiences you have had thus far into a cohesive narrative of a professional self Write a formal grant proposal Create an e-portfolio for professional marketing purposes Develop a comprehensive capstone experience predicated on the totality of your experience thus far Prerequsites: Permission of the instructor.

TH-399   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows the department to offer special topics not normally offered. Departments may offer more than one special topic. Prerequisites vary by title.

TH-405   Directing (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; F,H,CS) The basic principles of stage directing are offered with areas of inquiry and practical application in: script selection and analysis, audition/casting techniques/considerations, rehearsal preparation, the prompt script, working with designers, decision making, working with actors, being a director/guide( vision, focus, note- taking, and giving), and bringing a script/actors/designers to performance. Each student will select and work on a one-act script which, will be presented to the public in a spring semester festival. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing, TH206 and TH243, and permission of the instructor.

TH-421   Acting III: Styles (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; F,CS) In this course we will investigate the historical and cultural origins of a variety of acting styles, including Greek, Elizabethan, and 20th century non-realistic forms. We will encounter playwrights and theatre makers as wide-ranging as Shakespeare, Beckett, Brecht, and Pina Bausch. At the end of the semester we will perform a public performance of final scenes from a multitude of styles. Prerequisite: TH221.

TH-490   Theatre Internship (Variable; Variable; 2.00-9.00 Credits; H) See Internships in the catalog. Corequisite: TH495. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor and Jr. or Sr. standing.

TH-494   Senior Capstone (Fall; Yearly; 1.00-3.00 Credits; F) The Theatre Capstone provides an opportunity for senior theatre students to demonstrate excellence in acting, movement, vocal technique, and either writing or interpretation of existing text of their choosing. Seniors gain hands-on directing experience through the completion of their piece, and will be working with a professional designer. Student projects are based on proposals and may include live performances or film projects. Capstones will be presented to a public audience and mentored by faculty. Seniors may register for this course at between one and three credits, depending on credit needs. Prerequisites: Senior status and Theatre Performance POE.

TH-495   Internship Research Seminar (Variable; Variable; 2.00-6.00 Credits; H) See Internships in the catalog. Corequisite: TH490. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor .

TH-TUT   Theatre Tutorial (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) See Catalog.

Cultural Analysis

Cultural Analysis(CA)

Faculty:

Provost Lauren Bowen - ext. 3123

Interdisciplinary Colloquia (IC) and (CA)

Students will need to choose one course from a listing of courses known as Interdisciplinary Colloquia (IC) and one course from a listing known as Cultural Analysis (CA).  In the IC course, faculty from different disciplines work with students in a team-taught and interdisciplinary setting to tackle a significant topic while developing writing, discussion, close reading, and critical thinking skills.   The CA courses focus on some aspect of culture or offer an introduction to a culture by using both scholarly and primary texts from that culture and are also committed to developing writing skills. 

The IC and CA courses require sophomore standing and above and can be taken  in any order or  even at the same time.  The Interdisciplinary Colloquium and Cultural Analysis requirement will be waived for students who successfully complete a world language course beyond the 210 level in the target language and a semester or more of study abroad in the  target language and culture.  Please note that the credits (7  to 8 credits) need to be earned elsewhere to earn the needed 120 for graduation.



PLEASE NOTE:  To find Interdisciplinary Colloquia courses and Cultural Analysis that are offered in the home department, please use CLASS SCHEDULES and look under SKILLS.

Interdisciplinary Colloquia Courses:

IC-202   Shaping the American Mind (Fall; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; IC) Beginning in the seventeenth century scientific revolution, continuing with a look at the enlightenment thinkers that brought notions of liberty, economics and pluralism to the United States, this course uses the history of ideas to ask why we Americans are and what ideas helped make us this way. Prerequisites: EN110 or EN109.

IC-204   Evolution and American Culture (Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; IC) The Darwinian Revolution, based on Darwinian evolutionary theory, is one of the greatest and most profound human achievements. But today, more than 150 years after the publication of Darwin's Origin of Species, we still have not come to terms with its mind-boggling implications and not fully explored its awesome explanatory power in transforming our thinking of many big issues (e.g. sex and marriage, family, gender, race, morality, human nature, religion, meaning of life, etc.). This course will accomplish something far more interesting than to debate or argue for the truth of evolution theory or how to accommodate our traditional religious beliefs to the framework of evolution and science. To accomplish our objective, we will first trace the development of Darwinian evolutionary theory and reconstruct the Darwinian paradigm. We will then study and explain the nature of the conservative religious and other forms of cultural reactions to Darwinian theory in American culture. And finally, we will investigate the many culturally significant and profound implications of the Darwinian Revolution in our society. Prerequisites: EN-110 or EN109.

IC-205   Modern Knowledge & the Self (Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; IC,CW) Who are we? In what kind of world do we live? What can we know about the world and ourselves and how? This course examines how the modern has changed our answers to these and other questions. Particular attention will be paid to modern and post-modern understandings of scientific and narrative knowledge as well as cultural transformations in the comprehension of the self. Materials include films, novels, essays, and the visual arts. Prerequisites: EN110 or EN109.

IC-208   The History of God (Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; IC,CONN) This course will give students an introduction to the concept of God in western culture and how our understanding of God has changed from the ancient Hebrews to the modern era. Topics will include how concepts of God have been influenced by politics and culture; the interrelationship between popular and intellectual religion; and how religious belief influences, and is influenced by power. Prerequisite: EN110 or EN109.

IC-210   Comics and Culture (Spring; Variable; 4.00 Credits; IC) This course will explore the rule of comics in shaping and reflecting American culture. It will explore the basic structure of comics and graphic novels, the historical birth and evolution of the American comic book, and the counter culture response to these comics. Students will write and draw a short story in comic book format as well as write short assignments and a research paper. Prerequisite: EN110 or EN109. A special fee for supplies and a field trip will apply.

IC-220   Interpreting the Bible & Constitution (Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; IC) Both the Bible and the Constitution have been interpreted very differently at different times and by different people. How can we know which interpretations are right? Is there even such a thing as a " right " interpretation? This course examines the art of interpretation and critically evaluates some common and conflicting interpretations of the Bible and the Constitution. Prerequisites: EN110 or EN109.

IC-223   Islam: Real and Imagined (Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; IC) This course is designed to introduce students to Islam and to the political and cultural heritage of the Islamic world, both in practice and in theory, and from the perspective of both insiders and outsiders. It includes the basics of Islam and the history of the Islamic world's interaction with the West in the recent past. Throughout the course, we will connect the topics and themes of the early era with the concerns of our own era. Focus will not just be on the Middle East, but will also include Islam in the United States and around the world.

IC-229   Spanish & Service in Guatemala I (Spring; Even Years; 1.00 Credit; IC,SW-GE) This spring module serves as extended orientation and preparation for the two-week intensive Spanish and service learning module, IC-230, that will take place immediately following commencement. Students must have intermediate Spanish proficiency equivalent to four semesters of college Spanish or enroll concurrently for a fourth-semester Spanish course. Prerequisites: Completion of SP-230 or a Spanish course beyond SP-230 taught in the target language. Corequisite: IC-230.

IC-230   Spanish & Service in Guatemala II (Summer; Even Years; 2.00 Credits; IC,SW-GE) This two-week summer module in Guatemala follows IC-229, the spring module that provides extended orientation and preparation for this intensive Spanish and service learning experience. Students must have successfully completed IC-229 and have intermediate Spanish proficiency equivalent to four semesters of college Spanish to participate in the course. Prerequisites: Completion of SP-230 or a Spanish course beyond SP-230 taught in the target language. Corequisite: IC-229.

Cultural Analysis Courses:

Education

Department Website:

https://www.juniata.edu/academics/departments/education/

Faculty:

Juniata College Education Department Mission Statement

The mission of the Juniata College Education Department is to prepare highly qualified educators and human service professionals who are committed to ethical leadership in the global community.   Faculty and students value mutual support and the free and open exchange of thought.  Through collaboration with local education agencies and families, the Department prepares competent professionals who are confident to face challenges, sensitive to diverse learners, skilled in the use of progressive technology and research-based practice, and dedicated to improving the quality of education for all.

NOTE: Teacher certification programs are subject to changes in state and federal regulations.  Entrance to a certification program may include requirements over and above those of the College. Students may apply for formal admission to a certification program after they have met all requirements specified by the Juniata Education department and the Pennsylvania Department of Education, including the following: completed at least 48 credits of college level study that includes six semester hours of college level English composition and literature and six credits of college level mathematics; earned at least a 3.0 GPA;  and  passed required basic skills exams in Math, Reading and Writing on the PAPA or CORE exams or exempted out of the exams through alternative SAT or ACT scores. Title II of the Higher Education Act of 1998 requires that each year all institutions publicize the pass-rate for students who complete a certification program on a yearly basis. Please see the Education Department website for certification requirements and the most current Title II information. The Juniata College Education Department Student Handbook provides current information on all certification requirements, and the Education Department Certification Officer will assist you with questions.

Special programs, facilities, or equipment:

Programs of Emphasis:

Field Experience:

Courses:




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ED-110   Foundations of Education (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S,WK-SI) Discusses the historical and contemporary bases of major political, economic, legal, sociological, and psychological issues affecting public school systems. Students review current issues in education and write a personal philosophy statement. Co-Req: ED-111. Pre-Req or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

ED-111   Foundations of Education Field Experience (Variable; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; S) Provides a classroom experience for students who are interested in education to explore teaching as a career and observe the application of multiple philosophies, theories, and teaching strategies. Corequisite: ED-110

ED-120   Child Development (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Provides an in-depth introduction to child development, cognition, behavior, and learning from conception through middle childhood. Using an ecological approach, students examine characteristics of physical, social, emotional, cognitive, and language development at each age; identify typical and atypical development; compare and contrast major theories of development and learning; and explore diverse issues in child development and early education, including gender, culture, language, ability, family, social policy, educational setting, and the influence of heredity and environment. Assignments include readings, research, presentations, and direct observation of young children. Corequisite: ED-121.

ED-121   Child Development Lab (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; S) Extends and enhances learning in ED120, Child Development, through authentic classroom opportunities to observe and interact with young children and early education professionals, apply knowledge and understanding of child development and theory, analyze and assess development using formal and informal assessment tools, examine portfolios and Individual Education Plans, monitor student performance, and adapt instruction and interactions to meet individual needs, scaffold learning, and guide behavior. Corequisite: ED120 or permission of the instructor.

ED-130   Adolescent Development (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Examines human physical, cognitive, and social-emotional development from preadolescence through emerging adulthood. Topics include: identity, sexuality, and gender issues; emotional and behavioral challenges of adolescence, the impact of culture, language, and disability on adolescents, and the role of family, schools, and peers on development. Enrollment priority in this course is given to Education POEs.

ED-199   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Special topics provides students, particularly those not seeking certification, with experience organizing and communicating knowledge in their fields of study. This may be accomplished in public schools or other areas of social/community work, e.g., community health programs or family planning agencies. Note: titles may vary each semester; students may take each course for credit.

ED-201   Educational Technology (Either Semester; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Introduces educational technology and computer systems and their current applications in the classroom. Topics to be covered include office programs, Web 2.0 programs, multimedia programs, course management systems and web-page construction; classroom presentation software; use of assistive technology and software evaluation. Prerequisite: ED-110/111 or ED-120/121 or ED-130.

ED-219   Environmental Education: Past & Future (Variable; Variable; 1.00 Credit; S) Environmental Education is becoming a primary focus and mandated in K-12 schools in Pennsylvania. We'll explore the historical roots, review the standards, review research and prominent researchers in EE, determine the essential elements and find and develop environmental lessons to be incorporated in today's classrooms. Prerequisites: ESS-100 or ED-130.

ED-240   Introduction to Students With Exceptionalities (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Introduces the culture of exceptionalities within the public special education system. Historical, philosophical, educational, and legal perspectives will be presented. Students will learn the categories of exceptionalities, general characteristics of individuals with exceptionalities eligibility criteria, and the referral process for special education services. Professional and community resources, inclusion and other current issues will be discussed. Prerequisites: ED110 and ED111 and ED120 and ED121 or ED130.

ED-299   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows departments to offer courses not normally taught.

ED-300S   Sign Language I (Variable; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; S) Provides the learner with the understanding of the basic signs used by the deaf and hearing-impaired persons. Goals of the class include problems of communicating with the hearing impaired or deaf persons, as well as knowledge of basic sign language and word endings. Prerequisites: ED120 or ED130.

ED-301   Sign Language II (Variable; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; S) Provides the student with a more advanced vocabulary with the linguistic structure of the language and the principles in building ED302. Prerequisite: ED300.

ED-302   Sign Language III (Variable; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; S) Sharpens everyday communication skills. Students will gain the use of rapid finger spelling in combination with the language of signs for proper nouns, names, addresses, and words that have no signs. The class will also provide a further study of the use of possessives, plural tenses, word markers, and appropriate facial expressions and body language in their use of the language signs. Prerequisite: ED301.

ED-303   Issues in Special Education (Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; S) Using case studies, students will analyze, evaluate, and discuss current issues and trends in the field of special education. Topics of discussion include current litigation and legislation, educational policy, popular trends, and contemporary practices as they pertain to individuals with disabilities and the professionals with whom they work. Within course assignments, students will be required to display critical thinking skills in the analysis and synthesis of issues and concepts. Prerequisites: Take ED-110 and ED-111 and ED-240 and ED-343.

ED-312   Language and the Brain (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Provides an overview of research-based models of language acquisition, both typical and atypical in children. Topics include theories of language acquisition, neurological bases of speech and language, cognitive, perceptual and motor bases of early language and speech,social and communicative bases of early language and speech, language learning and teaching, relationship of language to literacy acquisition, language differences in diverse learners. Prerequisites: ED120, ED121.

ED-313   Language and Brain Lab (Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; S) Extends and enhances learning in ED312 Language and the Developing Brain. Through participation in classroom settings, students will be able to observe and interact with young children in Kindergarten through Grade 2 and public education professionals, apply knowledge and understanding of language development and theory, analyze and assess language development using formal and informal assessment tools, monitor student performance, and adapt instruction and interactions to meet individual needs, scaffold learning, and guide behavior. Prerequisites: ED120 and ED121. Corequisite: ED312.

ED-314   English Language Learners (Either Semester; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; S) Focuses on the historical, legal, and cultural issues pertaining to meeting the educational needs of English language learners. Students are be introduced to research based best practices in instruction and assessment strategies for working with English language learners in the general education classroom setting. Prerequisite: ED120 or ED130.

ED-315   ELL Field Experience (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; S) Provide students with 30 hours of field experience and participation in a variety of multi-cultural and multi-lingual environments in order to broadentheir own experiences, prepare to teach English learners, and work with diverse families. Students accumulate required hours throughout their program, but they formally register for course credit during student teaching or their final semester at Juniata College. Prerequisites: ED314. Graded S (satisfactory) or U(unsatisfactory).

ED-330   Language and Literature I K-1st (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; CW,S) Emphasizes methodologies of teaching the language arts (listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, and visually representing), including the development of these abilities and the provision for ELL students and students with special needs in language learning. The primary purpose of this course is to bring each student to an understanding of communication as the complex, rich, and primary form of human interaction. Prerequisites: ED311 and ED312 or permission of the instructor.

ED-341   Adaptations for Students With Exceptionalities (Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; S,CW) The purpose of this course is to learn how to develop and manage effective inclusive learning environments for students with disabilities at the secondary level. Content will focus on the knowledge and skills necessary to create an instructional environment that communicates challenging expectations to students while utilizing and modifying research based instructional strategies/resources/technologies. Students will learn the critical components of effective collaboration with parents and professionals. Successful completion of a field experience in an educational setting is also a requirement. Prerequisites: ED110, ED111 and ED240.

ED-342   Assessment Learners (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) This course provide in depth knowledge of and skills in assessment as it pertains to students with disabilities, the special education system, and Pre-K through grade 4 education. Historical perspectives as they relate to contemporary assessment practices are highlighted. Focus is placed on selection and administration of assessment tools, scoring, and interpretation of data for early intervention and special education eligibility. Students will be required to write an Individual Family Service Plan (IFSP) and an Individual Education Plan (IEP). Prerequisites: ED110 and ED111 and ED120 and ED240 and ED121 or ED130.

ED-343   Differentiated Instruction (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) The purpose of this course is to develop skills for the development and management of effective inclusive learning environments at the Pre-K through Grade 4 level. Content will focus on the strategies necessary to create an instructional and social environment that communicates challenging expectations to students while utilizing and modifying research based instructional strategies/resources/technologies to address individual learning needs. Focus is placed on strategies for establishing positive relationships with students, parents, and professionals. Prerequisites: Take ED-120, ED-121, and ED-240. Corequisite: ED-401.

ED-350   Science Methods (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) This course is for Education students seeking certification in the Pre-K-Grade 4 program and is intended to address the learning needs and best practices for teaching math, science, and technology to Pre-K-4th grade students in the 21st-century classroom. The primary focus of this course will be in the sciences but will include the integration of math, technology, and engineering. We explore science and the process of teaching science to elementary students using students' natural curiosity. The main vehicle of exploration will be an inquiry approach as we discover STEM learning the way we want our students to experience it. Prerequisites: ED-110/111, and ED-120/121 or ED-130. ED-130 may be taken as an alternate prerequisite for ED120/121 only.

ED-370   Practicum in EC Education (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00-3.00 Credits; S) A field experience designed for students seeking early childhood certification. This course is especially desirable for students who have done or will do practicums at the elementary level. Requires sophomore standing and instructor permission.

ED-390   Field Experience in Elementary Education (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00-3.00 Credits; S) A field experience in which students apply theory previously learned in the classroom in a practicum situation. This practicum is not the normal student teaching that is required for certification. Prerequisites: ED110, ED120 and ED121. Note: Available by permission only.

ED-392   Field Experience in Secondary Education (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00-3.00 Credits; S) A field experience in which students apply theory they have learned in a middle or high school setting. This practicum is not the normal student teaching that is required for certification. Available by permission only. May be repeated up to a maximum of 9 credits.

ED-395   Field Experience in Early Childhood Education (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00-3.00 Credits; S) A field experience designed for students seeking Pre K-4 certification. This course is especially desirable for students who have done or will do field experiences at the elementary level. Prerequisites: ED120 and ED121. Course may be repeated up to a total of 3 credits. Available by permission only.

ED-396   Practicum in Special Education (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00-3.00 Credits; S) A field experience primarily designed for students seeking special education certification or interest in education studies. This course provides students with opportunities to gain more experience working with students with special needs in a variety ofeducational settings. Prerequisites: ED341 Available by permission only.

ED-398   Methods for Foreign Language Education (Fall; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; S,CS) This course is for students interested in teaching foreign languages or English as a foreign language or second language (ESL). This course provides a thorough introduction to contemporary theories and methods of language pedagogy. Students seeking K-12 certification in foreign languages may take this course instead of ED420 after completing study abroad. It may also be taken by those students who have an interest in teaching English abroad. International students who are here for a semester or a year should also consider taking this course. Prerequisites: ED110 and ED111 and ED130 and ED240 and ED341.

ED-399   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows the department to offer courses not normally taught. Note: Titles vary each semester; students may take each special topics course for credit.

ED-401   Junior Field Experience (Fall; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; S) ED-401 is a comprehensive field experience. Students complete at least 4 hours/week of field experience, Prerequisites: ED-120, ED-121, and ED-240. Corequisite: ED-343.

ED-402   Content Area Literacy (Variable; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; S) Provides an in-depth introduction to multiple literacies and their effects on today's 21st Century classrooms. Topics include current research on information literacy, comprehension strategies, teaching ideas, and best practices in content area literacy. Students plan for instruction using the PA Standards Aligned System (SAS). Students pursuing secondary education certification are required to take this course. Prerequisites: ED 240 and junior or senior standing or instructor permission.

ED-403   Math Methods: PreK-6 (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Math is all around us and an early start in conceptual mathematics will promote understanding and problem solving for young learners. This course is designed to introduce appropriate teaching strategies that highlight both NAEYC and NCTM standards for the mathematical development of the child (Prek-6). Prerequisites: ED120 and ED121.

ED-410   Families and Teachers Education (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S,CS) Promotes understanding of family systems theory and the central role families play in the development of young children. While exploring their own beliefs and values, students examine family diversity and the impact of socioeconomic status, culture, language, lifestyle, and ethnicity on child development. The course focuses on developing effective interpersonal communication skills and strategies to establish culturally sensitive, nurturing relationships among teachers, children, and families. Students learn to build effective partnerships with families and community agencies through home visitation, assessment, case study, portfolio development, leading family workshops, and community involvement. Note: Practicum required.

ED-411   Reading Difficulties (Fall; Yearly; 2.00 Credits; S) This course provides an in-depth review of the literature concerning language-based learning disabilities. The course will address assessment and intervention strategies for struggling readers and writers in early and middle childhood. Formative, summative, benchmark, and diagnostic measures will be addressed as they relate to classroom intervention. Research-based intervention strategies will be analyzed within the perspective of meeting the needs of learners with diverse learning profiles and etiologies for their language-based academic difficulties. Topics included are early identification, research-based assessment and intervention, authentic assessment strategies for diverse learners and ELL's, technology to support instruction. Prerequisites: ED120 and ED121 or ED130 and ED212. Corequisites: ED412.

ED-412   Reading Difficulties Lab (Fall; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; S) This formal experience requires pre-service teachers to participate in an after school reading clinic for children in grades K through five who are identified as at-risk or struggling readers. Formal and informal assessment tools will be applied and used in decision making for research-based interventions. Communication with in-service teacher mentors and parents will be emphasized. Pre and post measures of achievement will be applied. A formal case report will be completed. Prerequisites: ED120 and ED121 or ED130 and ED212. Corequisites: ED411.

ED-413   Rural Outreach & Reading (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit) The Rural Outreach and Reading course offers an opportunity for education students to provide data driven reading interventions for primary school children who are struggling in reading and related language skills. Juniata students provide research-based interventions in small group and one-to-one settings two afternoons each week. Juniata Students complete readings related to the intervention, submit reflections, and provide reports of assessment and response to intervention.

ED-419   Pre-Student Teaching Field Experience (Either Semester; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; S) Secondary pre-student-teaching practicum is a required 80-hour minimum practicum in the linked placement where you will be going for student teaching. Students should plan to spend four consecutive hours in their placement each week.Reliable transportation is REQUIRED. Co-Requisite: ED-420.

ED-420   General Secondary Methods (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S,SW-ER) General Secondary Methods & Ethics in Education: This teacher education course is an overview of general methods for teaching secondary students. It also includes Disciplinary Literacy to help students meet the PA Core Standards. It will also address ethics in education and force students to rethink and challenge the current educational systems. Pre-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109;Co-Req: ED-419.

ED-423   Secondary Education Field Trip (Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; S) Secondary Education Field Trip (1 credit): Join in an interdisciplinary course that will design and execute a field trip for local secondary students. This is a practical application course that will highlight the importance of field trips and provide an opportunity for designing and executing a successful field trip.

ED-430   Language and Literacy (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S,CW) Three themes are woven throughout the course: helping students develop as strategic readers and writers; research-based best practices in teaching; and managing the classroom and curriculum for literacy instruction. The course will begin with a review of the reading and writing process and the principles of effective teaching of reading, based on the IRA/NCTE Standards for the English Language Arts. Emphasis is placed on meeting the individual learning needs of all the children and on application of the PA Academic Standards for Reading, Writing, Speaking, and Listening standards. Pre-Requisite: ED-310 (optional).

ED-432   Social Studies Methods (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Focuses on standards, current trends, materials, and teaching methods used in the early childhood and elementary education social studies curriculum. Students review social studies materials and trade books, select and organize content for teaching units, practice teaching strategies, and learn to individualize instruction. Focus is placed on an integrated and active approach to learning.

ED-433   Pre-Student Teaching Seminar (Fall; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; S) Students complete two half-day practicum visits each week in their upcoming spring semester student teaching placements and meet for a one-hour seminar each week to discuss current issues. Assignments include but are not limited to a weekly reflection journal, orientation to your school packet, observation reports, attendance, and participation. Prerequisites: ED-310 (optional). Corequisites: ED-430.

ED-440   High Incidence Disabilities (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) This course focuses on academic instruction for students with learning disabilities,attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, specific language impairment and mild intellectual disablilities. Topics include systematic teaching, co-teaching, language arts and mathematics instruction, content area instruction and strategy instruction. Prerequisites: ED240.

ED-441   Low Incidence Disabilities (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; S) Examines research-based practices for instruction and behavior management for students with low incidence disabilities, specifically severe cognitive impairments, low vision and blindness, autism, spectrum disorder, physical or health disabilities, and traumatic brain injury. Students complete a practicum in a low incedence classroom setting allowing them to apply concepts and techniques discussed in class. Students complete a series of assignments in the practicum setting Case studies, guest speakers, and field trips are included in this seminar format course. Prerequisites: Senior standing or permission of the instructor.

ED-442   Social,Emotional,Behavior (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) This course focuses on specific instructional and behavioral research based strategies for students with social, emotional, and behavioral disabilities. Emphasis is placed on school-wide behavior and classroom management systems designed to prevent inappropriate behaviors and promote appropriate and desirable behaviors. Students will learn empirical strategies and procedures for making the general curriculum accessible to students and the role of general and special education teachers in effectively addressing student needs. A major component of this course is the importance of promoting self-determination to facilitate independent learners. Prerequisites: ED240 and ED343.

ED-450   Student Teaching (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 14.00 Credits; S,SW-LE) Student teaching is the capstone experience for students preparing for certification to teach in their content area(s). Students synthesize and apply knowledge of developmental theory, content, and teaching methodology as they design, implement, and evaluate learning experiences in an intensive internship in the classroom. Co-requisite: ED-451. NOTE: Must have completed all clearances and requirements and have access to reliable transportation. Secondary level student teaching is in the fall semester; PreK-4th grade level and language education student teaching are in the spring semester.

ED-451   Student Teaching Seminar (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; S) In conjunction with student teaching, students attend weekly seminars that are led by the college supervisors. These meetings focus on professional topics and allow students to reflect upon and share their student teaching experience. In addition, students develop interviewing techniques, become familiar with employment seeking strategies, and develop a portfolio that includes but is not limited to a resume, a philosophy of education statement, lesson plans, and documentation of professional experiences. Corequisite: ED450.

ED-452   Dual Certification Student Teaching (Summer; Yearly; 6.00 Credits; S) The purpose of this course is to provide an additional student teaching experience for individuals who are seeking certification in more than one certification area. In order to enroll the student must have successfully completed all requirements including student teaching in another certification area or who hold Pennsylvania certification in another area. Prerequisite: ED450. Note: Students must enroll in summer school and pay for 6 credits.

ED-494   Internship/Need Paperwork (Variable; Variable; 2.00-9.00 Credits; S) See catalog.

ED-495   Internship Seminar (Variable; Variable; 2.00-6.00 Credits; S) See catalog.

ED-499   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows the department to offer subjects not normally taught. Prerequisites vary by title.

ED-501   Foundations of Special Education (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) Special education professionals apply knowledge of theories, evidence-based practices, and relevant laws to advocate for programs, supports, and services for individuals with exceptionalities. This course provides an overview of exceptionality in children/youth from birth to 21 years of age. Students will gain foundational knowledge of the field, professional ethical principles, and practice standards to inform special education practice.

ED-502   Special Education Law (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) This course provides a breadth and depth of information on special education law including: (1) a comprehensive overview of the history of special education, (2) pertinent court cases that impacted legislation, and (3) current legislation that secures access and rights for children and youth with exceptionalities and their families. IDEA (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act) and its principles will be a key focus.

ED-503   Understanding the Research in Special Ed (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) In this course students critically examine and interpret the current research in order to identify and subsequently utilize best practices in the classroom. Both qualitative and quantitative techniques are reviewed. Students review the professional literature and share findings with a learning community that embraces professional development.

ED-504   Supporting Students w/Behavioral Needs (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) This course provides an overview of strategies that promote social, emotional, and behavioral growth of students while fostering a welcoming and safe classroom environment that encourages positive behavior through the use of responsive and preventative measures. Students will learn to conduct functional behavioral analyses and apply principles of PBIS (Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports) to deliver evidence-based interventions that support positive behaviors.

ED-505   Assessment: Using Data to Drive Decisns (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) First, this course provides an overview of the special education process outlining how a child or youth is identified for services. Second, this course introduces students to a variety of assessment tools that are reliable, valid, and minimize bias. Students learn to create, administer, and score assessments and subsequently use this information to inform instruction, practices, and programming. Ethical practices and considerations are discussed.

ED-506   Effective Instruction for All (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) This course focuses on designing and delivering effective instructional strategies. Content will focus on understanding the unique needs and learning differences of all individuals and using this to inform practices and programming. In addition to an explicit and systematic approach, topics will include active student engagement, motivation, opportunities to respond, self-regulation, and grouping for instruction. Students will also learn to align standards to ensure access to the general education curriculum for all.

ED-507   Science of Reading (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) This course provides an in-depth review of the literature on structured literacy instruction that supports typical readers as well as students who struggle to acquire the literacy skills that are essential to success in school and life. Students will explore the body of work that exists on the Science of Reading (SOR) which is based upon an emerging consensus from multidisciplinary research that supports and explains the importance of explicit, systematic, and sequential instruction to support students' acquisition of literacy skills. The SOR framework for understanding reading development and disability will be utilized.

ED-508   Culturally Responsive Teaching (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits)

ED-509   Low Incidence Disabilities (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) In this course students will learn evidence-based strategies to work with learners with low-incidence disabilities, severe/multiple disabilities, and/or complex communication needs. Instructional strategies focusing on functional academics, social skills, prosocial behaviors, communicative competence, among other areas will be discussed. Additional topics include positive behavior supports, assistive technologies, AAC (Augmentative and Alternative Communication), and collaborative partnerships with families.

ED-510   Capstone in Special Education (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) Students engage in a culminating project that demonstrates the content knowledge and skills they learned throughout their program. Students identify and implement a best or emerging evidence-based practice and then collect baseline and intervention data to determine intervention effectiveness. By the end of the course, students produce a capstone paper and share their research within a learning community via a presentation. This course should be taken toward the end of the program. Pre-req: ED-501, ED-502, and ED-503

ED-TUT   Education Teaching Assistant (Variable; Variable; 1.00-3.00 Credits) Teaching Assistant

English

Department Website:

Faculty:

Background Information:

 

The Department of English offers a diversity of educational experiences in language, professional writing, and literature. The department aims to teach students to think clearly and creatively, to write evocatively and persuasively, and to read with intelligence and imagination. Such skills and knowledge will enable students to pursue not only a wide variety of exciting career paths but graduate study as well.

Special programs, facilities, publication or equipment:

Programs of Emphasis:

Individualized Programs of Emphasis:

Secondary Emphasis:

Internship/Research Experiences:

Specific department policy: 

Awarding credit for AP Exam scores: A student with an AP score of 4 or 5 will receive three General Elective Non Department credits, as it will not equate to an English elective.

Courses:

EN-120   Forms of Literature (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; H) An introduction to the study of literary forms, including poetry, drama, short story, novel, novella, and essay. Students will read texts from a wide variety of genres and historical periods, to examine how litereay forms developed and gain/lost popularity over time. Students will learn the vocabulary and technique of literary analysis.

EN-122   Interpreting Pop Literature (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H) Utilizing Harry Potter, The Hunger Games, World War Z, and other popular works of fiction for class, this introductory course will engage students in the fundamental terms and approaches needed to analyze, appreciate and discuss works of fiction at the college level. Students will study introductory elements of literary theory, emphasizing using various social and theoretical perspectives, as a means of learning how to identify cultural and literary meaning within texts.

EN-145   Peer Tutor Training (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; H) Peer tutor training is designed to provide an academic experience that will prepare students to serve as tutors. Students will focus on communication skills, learning styles, need analysis, and tutoring strategies. Prerequisite: EN110.

EN-146   WA Pedagogy and Practice (Fall; Yearly; 1.00 Credit) This course will provide an academic foundation for students who are serving as Writing Associates for first-year classes. Students will focus on how to provide provide formative feedback to students and maintain clear communication with professors. Coursework will include exploration of writing theory and learning modalities. This course will be required in order to serve as a Writing Associate.

EN-162   Women and Literature (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H,WK-HT) Hostility directed at women's reading and writing often serves as an indicator of a society's anxiety about the social impact of women's artistic and intellectual development. To read is to expand your knowledge of the world and your place in it. To write is to assert that your ideas, opinions, and voice are worthy of attention. This course presents selections from literature by women beginning with 18th century works before moving into contemporary writing. We will pay special attention to the historical and cultural contexts of our readings. Prerequisite: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

EN-170   World Literatures (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; H,I) Studies works of African, Asian, Latin American, South American, Caribbean, and Native American literature. Discussions focus on ways literature reveals cultural perspectives and philosophies.

EN-191A   Unlock Your Voice (Fall; Even Years; 1.00 Credit; H) A Coffeehouse to Celebrate Literature by Women Writers. Students who participate in this practicum will head teams of volunteers to produce all aspects of the program.

EN-191B   Lift Ev'ry Voice (Fall; Odd Years; 1.00 Credit) A Coffee house to Celebrate Black History Month. Students in this practicum will head teams of volunteers to produce all aspects of the program.

EN-199   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows the department to offer special topics not normally offered. Departments may offer more than one special topics. Prerequisites vary by title.

EN-200   History of the Language (Spring; Odd Years; 3.00 Credits; H,I) Like other languages, English is not monolithic, and it is always on the move. This course examines how English functions now, both in its Standard form and in many of its varieties around the world; how its sounds and structures have changed from its Proto-Indo-European beginnings; and what major factors have influenced those changes. Prerequisites: FYC101, EN110, or EN109.

EN-203   Class/Status/Identity in US Literature (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; SW-LE) This class willfocus on representations of social and economic class in U.S. literature. These texts illustrate how social class can define identity and shape perceptions of the American Dream. The class will collect and distribute oral histories about work experiences in collaboration with the local Huntingdon community members. Pre-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

EN-204   English Colloquium (Fall; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; H) The English Colloquium prepares students for academic expectations in the English department and introduces them to professional opportunities within the discipline. This colloquium is intended for students with English, Secondary Education/English or Professional Writing POEs, individualized POEs with foundation in literature or writing, or students with secondary emphases in English. Pre-requisites: sophomore standing, one EN course beyond EN110, or instructor's permission.

EN-207   Heaven or Hell on Earth (Spring; Even Years; 4.00 Credits; H) In this course we will examine the ways in which specific novels, short stories and films explore various perspectives on nightmarish or ideal societies through alternative political and social ideologies. The class will introduce various literary theories (including Marxism, approaches to feminism and New Historicism) as well as the genre and history of utopian and dystopian literature. V for Vendetta, Sir Thomas More's Utopia, Plato's Atlantis writings, Children of Men and other works will be covered during the semester. Prerequisites: EN110 or EN109.

EN-211   Pennsylvania Literature (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H,SW-US) Pennsylvania is a rich and storied landscape featuring a large rural area bookended by two historic cities, all serving as the backdrop for this course. Using literature and film, as well as articles, musical selections, and local engagement activities, this course will examine stories portraying various cultures, lifestyles, and people in Pennsylvania. This course will also consider how many of the different communities and peoples that make up the Keystone State have been represented historically and in fiction. Students will also explore some of the complex social, political, and economic contexts that have shaped the state's history as well as the lived experiences of its people. Pre-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

EN-212   Sports Literature (Spring; Odd Years; 3.00 Credits; H) Students will consider ways in which sports literature written over the last eighty years reveals the developing and shifting American ideologies concerning subjects such as race, gender, sexuality, and justice, over that same time period. Students will also develop an understanding of the genres and purposes in various forms of sports literature, including newspaper articles, magazine feature articles, short stories, and novels. Prerequisite: EN110 or EN109.

EN-213   Zombie Nation (Either Semester; Variable; 4.00 Credits; CA,H,SW-ER) Students will explore media that reflect our cultural fixation with zombies. Through analysis and discussion, students will explore the intersections between fictional zombies and actual cultural practices that reflect the mindlessness of a zombie culture. Students will explore the ethical implications of the creation and destruction of zombies. Prerequisite: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

EN-215   Boys Will Be Boys (Spring; Odd Years; 3.00 Credits; H) This course explores the experiences of men and boys as represented through works of fiction and analyzed via cultural, economic and social contexts. The course considers " maleness " as a social construct and how perceptions within American society influence men's actions and the ways in which they perceive themselves, other men, women, and social situations.

EN-217   Disability in Fiction (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H,SW-ER) This course considers how various texts portray individuals with disabilities. Via short stories, novels, theoretical articles, films, and memoirs we will explore ways that stereotypical portrayals can stigmatize and discriminate against people with disabilities. The class will also examine narratives and voices that question the definition of 'normal' as well as reinterpret traditional representations of disability. We will consider key concepts such as ableism, justice, access, and the medical and social models of disability. The course will also introduce some of the ways that disability intersects with other aspects of identity such as gender, sexuality, race, and class. Prerequisite: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

EN-236   Dirty Books (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H,CW,SW-ER) In this course, students will explore the ethical questions surrounding the practices of challenging, censoring, and banning books from American public schools and libraries based on objections to various texts' inclusion of sex, homosexuality, vulgarity, violence, and religion/atheism. Prerequisite: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

EN-237   Constructing Identities (Either Semester; Variable; 4.00 Credits; CA) Applying various cultural and theoretical perspectives, students will view and read works from Quentin Tarantino, Christopher Nolan, Kurt Vonnegut, Salman Rushdie, David Foster Wallace and others to examine ways that consumerism, technology, social institutions and other facets of modern culture and society shape identities and influence the human condition. Prerequisites: EN110 or EN109.

EN-238   Unnatural Acts (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; H) From the Puritans to tree-huggers, America has been divided between those who see Nature as moral and liberating, and those who see society as the taming of savage, godless wilderness. This course will examine that tension in writers from Hawthorne and Melville to Faulkner.

EN-239   Bloody Murder (Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H) The United States has always been a violent nation, and American writers have used that violence to explore questions of justice, truth, and human nature. This course will examine the portrayal of violence in writers from Poe to Cormac McCarthy.

EN-251   Narratives of Slavery (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H,CW,SW-US) The personal narratives of people enslaved in the United States are the foundational works of the African American literary tradition, and they have influenced generations of American authors. Originally written as a means of promoting the abolition of slavery, contemporary writers have taken this historical form and transformed it to reflect upon the past and engage with problems of the present. In this course, we will read a variety of original narratives of slavery and put them in dialogue with contemporary fictionalized narratives depicting the experience of slavery. In doing so, we will explore topics such as the boundaries between fact and fiction, the political uses of literature, the afterlife of slavery, cultural authenticity, and many others. Prerequisite: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

EN-253   Literature of the Jazz Age (Spring; Even Years; 3.00 Credits; H) Called the " Jazz Age " by F. Scott Fitzgerald, the 1920s were marked by great cultural change. In response to the trauma of the First World War, the " lost generation " broke traditional social barriers while embracing radically new forms of art. Beginning in 1920 (the year both women's suffrage and prohibition were passed as constitutional amendments) and concluding with the 1929 stock market crash that signaled the start of the Great Depression, we will examine the role of the Harlem Renaissance in inspiring and sustaining domestic and expatriate American modernism. With special emphasis on the interplay of art, music, and literature, this class will examine the literature of the Jazz Age across genre " and racial " boundaries, concluding with two contemporary works that evaluate the lasting significance of this era on American culture. Prerequisite: EN110 or EN109.

EN-255   Passing Narratives (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; CA,H) Passing narratives investigate how the boundaries of identity can be reimagined. Most often depicting racial passing (when a person " passes for " someone of another race), these narratives also can be about performing another gender or sexual identity. In this course, we will trace the evolution of this trope through American literature and film. Prerequisites: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

EN-262   Unhappily Ever After (Spring; Odd Years; 3.00 Credits; H) Deaths. Betrayals. Loves lost. Falls from grace. These calamities, and those that suffer them, have captivated dramatists, novelists, philosophers, and theoreticians since the first tragedy was staged in ancient Athens over 2,500 years ago. This course will explore how literary cultures have understood and expressed notions of tragedy in different historical periods. By examining the ways in which we inflict and endure suffering, wewill consider how literary tragedy informs our understanding of the human condition.

EN-271   Public Health Writing (Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; H,CW) Focuses on health and medical writing for public audiences. The course will familiarize students with health literacy, plain language, and visual communication skills. Students will analyze and compose common genres of public health writing, including reports about health in the media, advocacy documents, science journalism articles, and public health posters. Prerequisites: EN110 or EN109.

EN-272   Introduction to Professional Writing (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; H,CW,SW-ER) What are we talking about when we talk about professionalism? What characterizes professional communication? In today's world, what does it mean to use professional writing ethically? To answer these questions, this course focuses on the study, practice, and revision of writing in professional settings. Examining and producing memos, proposals, and reports, students take concrete steps towards exploring potential future careers. Prerequisite or Corequisite: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

EN-273   Visual Literacy (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H,WK-HT) In today's multimedia world, images communicate meaning and advance arguments in numerous ways, and new technologies of the visual demand new forms of literacy to understand, interpret, and create visual communication. Through comics and graphic novels, maps, visual arguments, and theories of seeing, this course immerses students into the theory and practices of visual literacy. Prereq: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

EN-299   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows the department to offer special topics not normally offered. Departments may offer more than one special topic. Prerequisites vary by title.

EN-301   Young Adult Literature (Fall; Even Years; 4.00 Credits; H) Students will read & analyze a variety of literature from the Young Adult Lit category. Students will engage in class discussions and make presentations based on individual research.

EN-302   The Literature of Social Protest (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; SW-US) In this course, we will explore the use of literature as a means of protesting social injustice throughout U.S. history. How have American authors used novels, poems, stories, and essays to illustrate social problems, create empathy, and advocate for social change? What are the boundaries between art and politics? How might literary aesthetics inspire social action? How has literature shaped social progress and vice versa? Questions of literary form, merit, and content will guide our search, as will questions of representation, politics, and economics. Though topics will range widely (but often intersect), we will ask how each literary work engages with the foundational statement of American dissent, " The Declaration of Independence. "

EN-305   Fiction Writing (Spring; All Years; 3.00 Credits; F,H,WK-CE) In this course, we will work to develop skills in the art of writing fiction. Students will study fiction as a craft, read and discuss fiction by major writers, critique each other's work, and write and revise extensively. Prerequisite: FYC 101 or sophomore standing.

EN-306   Creative Nonfiction Writing (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H,CW,WK-CE) The course introduces the art of the creative nonfiction essay-types of essays, variety of forms, and purposes of the essay. Students will write essays, revise extensively, and critique each other's work throughout the course. Through this process, students become familiar with the formal elements of prose style. Prerequisite: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109. Also must have sophomore class standing or above.

EN-307   Mythology in Film (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H,WK-HT) This course will explore how film communicates the myths of a various societies to its members. By combining theoretical approaches to myth with film analysis, we will explore the ways in which cinema both influences and reflects the way we think, what we value, fear, and aspire to achieve. Focusing on some of the most prevalent themes in this genre, students will be introduced to Classical and contemporary adaptations of myths and their historical and cultural contexts, examining how those narratives provide meaning today via cinema. Prerequisites: EN110 or EN108 and EN109.

EN-308   English Research Methods (Variable; Yearly; 2.00 Credits) This course is an introduction to English research methods taken in the junior year. Students will learn and negotiate the research process, applying the skills learned to their analysis of literary works or writing research. Writing, ethics, and constructing effective research questions and arguments will be covered to prepare students for completing their senior research thesis, paper, or creative project. Pre-req: EN-204 English Colloquium and Junior Standing

EN-311   Professional News and Feature Writing (Variable; Variable; 4.00 Credits; H,CW) This advanced writing course introduces students to the genres and techniques of journalism. Students will write a number of news and feature stories. The writing process involves interviewing, note-taking and other forms of data gathering on campus and at local news events, creating multiple story drafts, and participating in peer-editing workshops. Work culminates in a portfolio of stories written throughout the semester. Students need not plan to become professional media writers to benefit from the course. Prerequisite: FYC-101, EN-110, or EN-109.

EN-312   Literature of Revenge (Variable; Variable; 4.00 Credits; H,SW-ER) Students will examine the various functions revenge plays in human culture while tracing its role as a literary device from the bloodbaths of Greek tragedies to the psychological retaliation of contemporary works. Studying historical and cultural influences that have shaped notions of revenge over centuries, students will contemplate the complicated distinctions humans make between perceptions of retribution and justice. Prereq: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

EN-313   Firing the Canon (Spring; Odd Years; 4.00 Credits; H) When talking about the canon in literature, we are usually gesturing towards the classics-works of art that have stood the test of time as culturally significant. How did those books become classic in the first place? We will study the histories of canon formation before debating what works to include in a self-designed literary anthology.

EN-315   Technical Writing (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H,CW) An examination of writing for the real world: as such it concentrates equally on content and practice. The course builds around various document designs and ways to present those designs in expressions appropriate to audience and purpose. While sophomores are allowed to register they may be removed from the course if the demand by upperclassmen is high. Prerequisites: EN110 or EN109 and Sophomore, Junior or Senior standing.

EN-319   Writing for Social Change (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H) This course immerses students into the study and practice of writing that strives to bring about social change. Students explore the argumentative tactics of writing in the service of advocacy, activism, and non-profit organizations, as well as its circulation across audiences and platforms. Students create op-eds, persuasive articles, posters, grants, and media campaigns.

EN-341   Shakespearean Drama (Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H) Examines historical moments, cultural perspectives, and theatrical constructs that shaped the writing, acting, and reception of Shakespeare's comedies, tragedies, and history plays. Prerequisite: EN110 or EN109.

EN-372   Contemporary Poetry (Fall; Even Years; 3.00 Credits; CA,H) Contemporary poetry speaks to us right there and now, whether in a personal cry of emotion or in a piercing cultural commentary. This course studies representative poets from our own age, with emphasis on the social context of the times. Different poets are discussed each time the course is taught, but every year you'll actually get to meet one of them up close and personal, as part of our Pennsylvania Poet series. Prerequisite: EN110 or EN109.

EN-374   Ethical Game Design (Variable; Variable; 4.00 Credits; SW-ER,H,CW,CTDH) This course focuses on both the use of ethical principles to design games and the critical study of ethical games, which position players to make ethical decisions throughout the game. After learning about ethical principles through play and analysis, students design a text-based game where players make ethical choices shaping the narrative and experience of the game. Prerequisite: FYC-101

EN-376   Writing Across Media (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H,CW,WK-CE,CTDH) Contemporary life asks us to be agile interpreters of images, texts, and sounds. In response, this course immerses students into the theory and practice of how and why we choose the media in which we communicate. Through an assignment sequence that includes text, webtext, image, sound, and video, students gain strength and versatility as writers by honing their awareness of genre, audience, and rhetorical situation. Pre-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109

EN-378   Video Production Writing (Fall; Odd Years; 4.00 Credits; H,CW,CTDH,WK-CE) Writing for Video Production is a course that combines contemporary rhetoric, creative inquiry, design thinking, media authorship, self-reflection, and social engagement. Students complete directed writing such as journal entries, scripts, storyboards, and shotlists in concert with video production, facilitating an integrated process of thinking, creating, and problem-solving. Take FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109

EN-379   Professional Editing (Fall; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H,SW-LE) This course provides a broad understanding of editing and its role in document development, publication, and use. Students will learn to edit effectively on a range of editing tasks and documents and edit documents for a community partner project. These skills will prepare students for a variety of professional editing positions. Prerequisite: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

EN-385   Queer Literature (Variable; Variable; 4.00 Credits; CA,H) By applying queer theory frameworks to a variety of texts, we will examine literary representations of LGBTQ identity. Readings will include works by James Baldwin, John Rechy, Audre Lorde, Leslie Feinberg, Tony Kushner, and others. Topics will include: biological essentialism vs. the social construction of gender and sexual identity; authenticity and performance; social and legal forms of identity categorization and boundary maintenance; the role of literature in social reform; and more. Prerequisites: EN110 or EN109.

EN-388   Heroes and Villains (Fall; Variable; 3.00 Credits; H) Heroes-yay! Villains-hiss! All our lives we've learned to think in terms of good guys and bad guys. But why do we think in those categories? And what exactly do we mean by good guys and bad guys? And should we even be in the business of separating good guys from bad guys? This course will take a detailed look at heroes and villains in literature, movies, and television, and ask you to think about the whole duality, and what it means for the stories we tell. Prerequisites: EN110 or EN109.

EN-392   Crossing the Border (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H,CW,SW-US) This class will examine the many meanings of " border crossing " in 20th- and 21st-century literature about immigration to the United States. Using critical race theory, this class will put works of fiction and autobiography in historical context to better investigate the influence of immigration law on U.S. national literature. Beginning with short texts from the turn of the twentieth century, we will focus primarily on contemporary works dealing with the post-1965 (or " new wave " ) immigrant experience. Topics will include: " American Dream " mythology, social mobility, generational conflict, acculturation and assimilation, hyphenated identity, nativism, barriers to full citizenship, and more. Pre-req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109

EN-399   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Offers special studies to meet the interests and demands of students. past examples include " Terry Pratchett " and " Renaissance Drama " . Note: Students may take each ST: course for credit.

EN-490   English Internship (Variable; Variable; 2.00-9.00 Credits; H) English students may apply their acquired skills and knowledge in on-the-job internships of a semester during their junior or senior year for a total of 9 credit hours. Television stations, radio stations, newspapers, magazines, public relations and advertising agencies are all possible placements for the Juniata interns, who not only work as full-time members of the business's team but also evaluate and document their growth in a journal and prepare a portfolio of presentations or publications. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and Junior or Senior standing. Corequisite: EN495.

EN-493   English Research Seminar (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 2.00 Credits; H) This course is a seminar-style introduction to advanced research methodology in literature and linguistics for senior English POEs. Students will work simultaneously with the course instructor and a thesis advisor from within the English department to develop a thesis plan and to begin its execution. Prerequisites: EN120, EN122 and EN204; Senior standing; instructor permission only.

EN-495   English Internship Research (Variable; Variable; 2.00-6.00 Credits; H) In addition to the on-the-job experience provided by the internship, the student is required to pursue research related to the placement. An in-depth research paper or presentation is completed during the semester and turned in for a possible 3 credit hours. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and Junior or Senior standing. Corequisite: EN490.

EN-496   Senior Research Capstone (Variable; Yearly; 2.00-4.00 Credits; H) This course serves as a capstone experience in English that culminates in a substantial written thesis. The individual research project is conducted under the guidance of an English department faculty member. When completed, the thesis is presented in a public forum such as Liberal Arts Symposium, an oral defense, or a conference. Prerequisites: EN120, EN122, EN204 and EN493; Senior standing.

EN-499   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows department to offer subjects not normally taught. Requisites vary by title.

Environmental Science and Studies

Department Websites:

https://www.juniata.edu/academics/departments/environmental/

Core Faculty:

Mission Statement:

The mission of the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences is to prepare students for a successful post-graduate career in one or more earth and environmental science fields, and instill values of responsible environmental citizenship in all students who interact with our programs. We do this in accordance with the overall mission of Juniata College.

Background Information:

The Environmental Sciences and Studies (ESS) Department strives to train Juniata College students to solve problems related to Environmental system and to understand how these problems influence aesthetic, economic, natural resource, environmental, intellectual, and ethical issues facing society. ESS students have the opportunity to choose from curricula offered by the department including: (1) environmental economics, (2) environmental science, (3) environmental studies, and (4) wildlife conservation. Environmental science focuses on the scientific study of the relationship between humans and the natural world; Environmental studies examines that relationship from a social science and humanities perspective and Wildlife conservation focuses on an understanding and protection of biodiversity. Environmental Economics uses the tools of economics, finance, and psychology to help solve pollution and natural resource harvesting problems.

Special programs, facilities, or equipment:

Programs of Emphasis:

Examples of Individualized Programs of Emphasis:

Secondary Emphasis:

Take 4 courses from the required courses below:

Plus take 2 courses from the optional course below:

6 courses are required for the secondary emphasis.

GIS Certification program:

Geographic Information System (GIS) and spatial reasoning are a mainstay knowledge base for working professionals in environmental science, resource management, local and regional planning, disease monitoring and evaluation, real estate, military planning, and social science research. The Juniata GIS certificate program is offered jointly by the Environmental Science and Studies and the Computer Sceince and Infomration Technology Departments. We have two tracks to prepare a student for a career in any of the GIS fields. The first track has a focus on Environmental Science. This track has more courses in field methods in GIS and spatial analysis. The second track has a focus on Information Technology. This track has more courses in programming and data mining. The certificate is open to students in all deparments as well as to Juniata alumni.

Requirements for GIS (18-21 credits): 

We have designed this certificate based on looking at successful programs. We include tracks in Environmental Science and in Information Technology.  The requirements of the certification are as follows:

A. Quantitative field intro (1 course) (4 credits): This section requires the student to have a quantitative introductory class in their field. The requirement of this course is that it has a lab or quantitative section where Excel or other spreadsheet or database program is used to compile and represent or analyze data.

One course from the following:

Environmental Track ESS100 Introduction to Environmental Science
IT Track: IT111 Principles of Information Technology or CS110 Computer Science I.

B. Core Statistics or data analysis (1 course) (3-4 credits): One course from this section must be taken:

Environmental Track: ESS 230 : Environmetrics or BI 305 Biostatistics
IT Track: IM 241: Information Discovery

C. Core Geographic Information Courses (3 courses )(8 credits)

Both tracks:
• ESS 330: Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (or Methods in Marine Science)
• ESS 337 Advanced Topics in GIS and Remote Sensing

D. Field data collection component (1 course) (3-4 credits): This section is intended to have students exposed to the vagaries of field data collection. It is preferred that students collect spatially explicit data using GPS technoligies or other spatially explicit survey methods. Database manage or other courses that explore the process of data collection will also meet this requirement.

IT Track:
 CS 370 Database Management
Environmental Track: (Pick One From)

E. Capstone or project requirement (1-4):

IT Track: This will normally be a GIS related project done via an IT 307/308 and 380 or 480: Innovation for Industry course series, but it may be done as an independent study or project stemming from another course.
Environmental Track: This will normally be a GIS related project done via ESS 410 Senior Capstone class, but it may be done as an independent study or project stemming from another course.

Contacts:

Neil Pelkey, PhD.: Associate Professor Environmental Science and Studies and IT
Email: pelkey@juniata.edu or (814)641-3589

Dennis Johns, PhD.: Professor and Chair Environmental Science
Email: johnson@juniata.edu or (814)641- 5335

Loren Rhodes, PhD.: Professor and Chair, Computer Science and Information Technology
Email: rhodes@juniata.edu or (814) 641-3620 

Sample Internship/Research Experiences:

Courses:

ESS-100   Environmental Systems I (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N,WK-SP,CTGIS) This course introduces students to the concept of systems, reviews ecological systems, and then goes on to human systems as these impact the environment. The course will explore the two forces that are at the core of most environmental impacts (climate change, ozone depletion, air and water pollution, and a loss of biodiversity) will be explored as will the fundamental attributes of agriculture, food, soil, and water. Throughout, the influence of culture, society, ethics, and science on the environmental problems will be discussed. Pre-Req or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109

ESS-110   Environmental Systems II (Variable; All Years; 3.00 Credits; N,SW-LE) This course introduces students to the concepts of environmental systems and sustainability, review of ecological systems, and human impact on the environment. Students will work on a restoration/conservation project with a community partner to improve soil/water resource quality in the community. Students will be introduced to scientific writing and write a scientific paper. Pre-req or co-req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109. (NOTE: ESS-100 is not a prereq for ESS-110.)

ESS-118   Global Justice Film (Variable; Yearly; 1.00 Credit) Through the medium of film, this one-credit course showcases environmental and sustainability issues within a global context. The themes and documentaries presented in the course will focus on intersecting elements of the environment, culture, access, class, gender, sustainability, and innovation. Based on the documentaries and discussion in the course, opportunities to engage in local sustainable measures will be possible.

ESS-119   Environmental Film (Variable; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; F) This course explores classic and current environmental and nature films and documentaries as both art and information. Students will watch and discuss 10 films.

ESS-121   Environmental Film Lab (Variable; Yearly; 2.00 Credits; F) Create a short nature or environmental film. The course will cover filming, sound interviewing experts, and post-production. Students will use Adobe Premier and Audition.

ESS-199   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows departments to offer topics not normally scheduled. Prerequisites, corequisites, and fees vary by title.

ESS-206   Global Environmental Issues (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N,WK-SI) Global Environmental Issues is a global public health course. Environmental problems create some of the most pressing public health issues of our time. This course seeks to train the participants to identify the public health challenges created by environmental problems in various parts of the world and exploring practical solutions for those problems.

ESS-212   Kenyan Cultures & Natural Resources I (Spring; Variable; 2.00 Credits; SW-GE) This short-term study abroad course series provides an interdisciplinary and intercultural introduction to Kenya though a wide range of experiences. Kenya is a diverse country with many different ecosystems, languages, and cultural traditions, making it a dynamic and vibrant place. Apart from visiting national parks, the students will examine wildlife management as a tool to build economic resilience in communities. NOTE: This is a two-course sequence that includes a predeparture course (ESS-212) on campus in spring semester and a two-week travel course in summer term (ESS-213). The total fee for the experience is split between the two courses. Pre- or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

ESS-213   Kenyan Cultures and Natural Resources II (Summer; Variable; 2.00 Credits; SW-GE) This short-term study abroad course series provides an interdisciplinary and intercultural introduction to Kenya though a wide range of experiences. Kenya is a diverse country with many different ecosystems, languages, and cultural traditions, making it a dynamic and vibrant place. Apart from visiting national parks, the students will examine wildlife management as a tool to build economic resilience in communities. NOTE: This is a two-course sequence that includes a predeparture course (ESS-212) on campus in spring semester and a two-week travel course in summer term (ESS-213). The total fee for the experience is split between the two courses. Pre-Req: ESS-212.

ESS-219   Agroecology (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; N) This course will explore alternate production systems in agriculture as ecological systems.

ESS-224   Wildlife Mgmt (Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; N) Wildlife management incorporates the science and management of wild animals, both rare and common species. Threatened species may require particular knowledge of population structure and processes for effective management, while common species may need control or might be exploited as novel production products. Prerequisites: ESS-100 or BI-101 or BI-105.

ESS-225   Wildlife Management Techniques (Variable; Yearly; 2.00 Credits; N) Course will provide students with knowledge of common field research techniques employed by wildlife biologists.

ESS-230   Environmetrics (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N,QS,CTGES,CTGIS) This course is a survey of the various visual, statistical, and modeling approaches commonly used in the analysis of environmental data. The course covers: (1) visual literacy from exploratory data inquisition to poster creation; (2) elementary group comparisons such as t-test and ANOVA and their non-parametric analogs;(3) basic systems modeling; and (4) regression modeling techniques based on the generalized linear model framework.

ESS-235   Environmental Reading (Variable; Variable; 1.00 Credit; N,CW) This class will explore 2-3 classic and/or modern works in environmental studies and natural history. The writers list includes: Aldo Leopold, Annie Dillard, Dan Dagett, Saul Alinski, Wangari Maathai, Gifford Pinchot, Bill McKibben, Mary Kingsley, Ian McHarg, Wendel Berry, Andrew Lytle, Ester Boserup, Roderick Nash, Vandana Shiva, Rose Reuter, Barry Lopez, Bernd Heinrich and others.

ESS-261   Marine Biology I (Fall; Variable; 3.00 Credits; N) This course takes a biological, physiological, and ecological approach to studying life in the oceans. We start with a basic review of the ocean. We will then provide an overview of the oceans as the course has a global focus. We then take a biological tour up the food chain.

ESS-262   Fluid Mechanics (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) An introductory course in the basic principles of fluid properties and fluid flow. The course will cover fluid system/control volume relationship analysis for continuum, energy, and momentum study

ESS-265   Food Fermentation (Variable; Variable; 1.00 Credit; N) Salt, pH, bacteria, fungi, heat, and evaporation have been used by cultures around the work to preserve and enhance food. We will explore these processes by reading about the processes and then producing some of the simpler products from these traditions including jerky (drying and salting), cheese (bacterial and enzymatic fermentation), artisanal bread (fungal and bacterial fermentation), kimchi (bacterial fermentation), kombucha (Fungal and Bacterial fermentation), essential oils (evaporation and precipitation), and fermented but non-alcoholic ciders (fungal fermentation and pH reduction).

ESS-297   Fire Ecology & Management (Variable; Variable; 2.00 Credits) This course provides students with an understanding of wildland fire fighting and controlled burns as tools for forest management. The successful student will have satisfied the minimum training requirements to participate in controlled burns and fight wildland fires.

ESS-298   Animal Care, Training , and Education (Variable; Variable; 4.00 Credits; N) The Animal Care, Training, and Education course covers all aspects of operating an educational wildlife center. Topics include permitting, housing, husbandry, training, and conservation outreach with native wildlife. The course will provide the scientific foundations of animal husbandry, behavioral science, and educational methodology. A strong hands-on component, utilizing Shaver's Creek Environmental Center's Animal Care Facilities, provides students with an immersive experience to develop these skills under the guidance of the centers' staff. Select field sessions will enhance conservation connections to Shaver's Creek's live animal exhibits.

ESS-299   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-3.00 Credits; N) Allows the departments to offer special topics not normally offered. Departments may offer more than one special topic. Prerequisites, corequisites, and fees vary by title.

ESS-301   Environmental Methods (Either Semester; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) This course deals with a variety of environmental issues and problems. This includes the causes and the scientific and social backgrounds needed to understand them. It also introduces the student to the roles of scientists and engineers in dealing with them. The course involves both quantitative and qualitative assessments. Prerequisites: ESS100 and 1 year of chemistry or permission of the instructor.

ESS-305   Environmental Economics (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) This course will cover the basics of microeconomic analysis as it applies to the environmental decision making and environmental policy with respect to pollution abetment, resource harvesting, and sustainability analysis. The course will also explore the strengths and weaknesses of economic models of human behavior. Finally, the course explores the growing concern of sustainable and resilient economies. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or permission of the instructor.

ESS-309   Econometrics (Spring; Yearly; 2.00 Credits; N,Q) A first course in econometrics with forays into regression, optimization, and modeling. Prerequisites: Introductory economics course.

ESS-310   Water Resources I (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; QM,N) This course provides the student with a working overview of the hydrologic cycle, providing the student with the basic concepts of all aspects of hydrology. Particular emphasis is placed on the integrative nature of ecosystems within the watershed, including the interdependencies and driving forces of energy, the atmosphere, the hydrosphere, and the land, and the biosphere. Prerequisites: ESS100.

ESS-315   Environmental Chemistry (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits) Environmental Chemistry is an application of chemical principles to the study of the environment. It includes natural processes and pollution problems related to air, water, and soil.

ESS-318   Environmental Water Quality (Either Semester; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N) The objective of this course is to provide an overview of surface and groundwater quality and the impacts of human and natural influences on both human and environmental health. Analytical methods for water quality assessment. Physical, chemical, and biological factors of water quality. Introduction to water/wastewater treatment processes. Prereqs: CH-142 and BI-101.

ESS-320   Environmental Monitoring (Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N) This course develops skills in monitoring the environment, with a strong focus on water quality monitoring (both chemical and biological) in a variety of habitats. Environmental site assessment will also be conducted. A weekend-long field trip is required. Prerequisite: ESS100 and ESS200 or permission.

ESS-321   Water & Wastewater Treatment (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits) Theory and design of water and waste treatment systems for industrial, municipal, and hazardous pollutants and natural biotransformation of pollutants in the environment. Laboratory experience in startup, operation, and analysis of systems that biodegrade pollutants and produce useful forms of energy.

ESS-323   Aquatic Ecology (Variable; Variable; 4.00 Credits; N) A study of the physical, chemical, and biological aspects of streams, rivers, ponds, and lakes. Emphasis on the role of water chemistry, pollution, and biotic interactions on the distribution of aquatic life. Laboratory includes field sampling and identification of aquatic organisms.

ESS-324   Natural Resource Management (Either Semester; Variable; 3.00 Credits; N) This course provides a comprehensive coverage of local, regional, national, and global resource and environmental issues from population growth to wetlands to sustainable agriculture and natural resource policies and legislation. It considers renewable and non-renewable resources such as water, land, soil, air, wildlife, and their associated habitats. Prerequisites: ESS-100 and either BI-101 or BI-105.

ESS-325   Conservation Biology (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S,N) Conservation Biology encompasses biology, politics, ethics, economics and anthropology. The major course objective is the exploration of conservation complexities--important for successful conservation efforts. Other objectives are to gain an understanding of extinction, community conservation, population genetics and demography. This course has a required weekend field trip with a fee added for the trip. Prerequisites: ESS-100 or BI-101 or BI-105.

ESS-328   Limnology (Fall; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N) An ecology/environmental science course covering inland aquatic environments (lakes and streams). A balanced study of both physical-chemical and biological aspects, it is an appropriate upper-level addition to a variety of POEs in natural sciences. Pre-Reqs: ESS-100 and either BI-101 or BI-105.

ESS-330   Geographical Information Systems (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; CTGIS) This course is an introduction to a Geographical Information System (GIS), and the course objective is that students gain a basic, partial understanding of GIS concepts, technical issues, and applications using Arc View GIS. It encourages thinking in spatial context. A diverse array of hands-on computer applications and projects are used to understand how geographical data can be analyzed spatially. Students explore analysis techniques in a problem basis learning approach using small team projects. Note: A special course fee is assessed. Prerequisite: ESS100.

ESS-335   Quantitative Ecology (Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; QS) The goal of the course is to advance student understanding of a broad range of numerical and graphical techniques used to analyze complex data sets encountered in the environmental sciences. Students will learn the context to properly apply these techniques to address research questions. The purview is ecological, but is applicable to all other quantitative endeavors. The course emphasizes conceptual understanding, relevant applications, and proper interpretation rather than gory, though interesting, statistical theory. Students will apply the R language and environment for statistical computing to tailor analyses to specific circumstances. Pre-reqs: ESS-110 and ESS 230.

ESS-337   Environmental Law (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S,CTGIS) This course will examine the major environmental laws in the United States and major Supreme Court cases covering these statutes. The status covered will be National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), The Clean Water Act (CWA), Clean Air Act (CAA), Endangered Species Act (ESA), Federal Insecticide Fungicide and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA), Toxic Substances Control Act (TOSCA), Forest Land Policy and Management Act (FLPMA), Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), and the Superfund Amendment and Reauthorization Act (SARA). Prerequisites: ESS-100 and sophomore standing or above.

ESS-340   Forestry (Fall; Variable; 3.00 Credits; N,CTGIS) This course provides a comprehensive survey of the discipline of forestry and forest ecology with special emphasis on tree identification, timber mensuration, and forest management issues in central Pennsylvania. Prerequisites: ESS100.

ESS-345   Ichthyology (Spring; Odd Years; 4.00 Credits; N,QS,CTGIS) This course provides an in-depth and active hands-on study of fishes within an evolutionary framework. Lecture explores fish ecology, evolution, diversity, systematics, zoogeography, and conservation. Laboratory focuses on fish classification, fish biology and morphology, and skills needed to identify fishes of the central Appalachians. Prerequisites: BI-101 or BI-105 and BI-102 or BI-121 plus junior standing, or permission of instructor.

ESS-346   Freshwater Invertebrates (Spring; Even Years; 4.00 Credits; N,QS) This course provides an applied experience studying aquatic invertebrates that occupy freshwater ecosystems of North America. Lecture focuses on invertebrate ecology, sampling, monitoring, and analysis strategies for bioassessment, conservation, and description of taxa. Laboratory focuses on taxonomy, classification, and identification of families of invertebrates of the local central Appalachians. Prerequisites: BI-101 or BI-105 and junior standing.

ESS-350   Field Research Methods (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N,CTGIS) Field Methodologies is intended for students interested in gaining experience in conducting filed based ecological or environmental research. Students will be lead through the process of investigation, including the generation of research questions, research planning and design, analysis of data, and presentation methods, while giving them the opportunity to conduct independent projects. This is not a techniques/equipment training course; it will fulfill the independent study requirement of the ESS POE. This course will be particularly useful to students considering a field based senior research project. A course in statistics or ecology is highly recommended. Prerequisites: ESS100.

ESS-352   Restoration Ecology (Variable; Variable; 4.00 Credits; N) This course provides an overview of how ecological knowledge can be used to guide the recovery or restoration of degraded ecosystems. Although many restoration projects are constrained logistically (money, people power, statutes, etc.), we focus largely on ecological processes, biological and landscape constraints, and what the science of ecology can bring to the field of ecological restoration.

ESS-355   Ornithology (Summer; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) This course provides a comprehensive survey of the comparative biology, ecology, and behavior of birds with a special focus on issues pertaining to conservation management. Laboratory activities focus on field identification of birds and research and monitoring techniques. Prerequisite: BI-101 or BI-105.

ESS-361   Field Methods in Marine Systems (Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N,Q) Taught in India. This is the methods portion of the course including field techniques, quantitative methods, and a scientific writing seminar. The student requirements will be a short paper, four section quizzes and a final exam Prerequisites: GL111 and ESS100. Permission of instructor required.

ESS-362   Island Ecosystems (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) Taught in India. This course will introduce the students to island ecosystems from both applied and theoretical viewpoint. The course will run in the Andaman Islands in India. The topics covered will include island fauna, island flora, reef ecosystems, and a ridge to reef view of these complex biotas. Prerequisites: GL111 and ESS100.

ESS-363   Upland Process and Estuaries (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) Taught in India. This course will introduce students to estuaries and upland processes. About 50% of the course will be on site with the discussion and activities intended to give a very close view of the processes, ecology, and issues in coastal watersheds and estuaries. Prerequisites: GL111 and ESS100 and permission of instructor.

ESS-364   Culture, Class and Gender (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; CA,S,I,CW) Taught in India. This course will cover issues of gender and other disadvantaged groups in coastal management. Fishing villages are often composed of people who are ethnically, religiously, or class-wise distinct from upland populations. Women also have culturally distinct roles in the harvesting, production, and processing of natural resources. Prerequisites: ESS100 and permission of the instructor and the Center for International Education. A trip fee is applied.

ESS-365   Sustainable Development (Summer; Variable; 3.00 Credits; I,N) This course is a combination of sustainable agriculture, sustainable forestry, coastal fisheries, very low impact living, and ecotourism. We will travel from Chennai to Pondicherry, then to the foothills of the Western Ghats, onward to the coastal port of Kochi in Kerala, and finally to the ecotourism resorts in Kovalam. Prerequisites: SO, JR, or SR standing.

ESS-377   GIS Advanced Topic (Fall; Variable; 4.00 Credits; N,QS) This course explores spatial decision support systems, hot spot modeling for home range, disease and crime, intermediate image analysis, habitat classification from multispectral and hyperspectral imagery. Prerequisites: ESS310 or ESS330 or permission of the instructor.

ESS-380   Sense of Place Seminar (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; CA,CW) Taught at Raystown Field Station. This is the " cornerstone " of the Sense of Place semester, managed by one faculty, but comprised of a series of modules taught by various faculty and guest speakers. Module topics cover a range of environmental, ecological, and societal issues connecting to the region. Students will be expected to journal their experiences at RFS as well as complete other writing assignments. Note: There is a course fee assessed. Prerequisites: ESS100 or permission of the instructor.

ESS-399   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Topics vary from year to year. They will focus one or more special environmental skills, methods, approaches or technologies. A laboratory fee will be assessed.

ESS-399L   Special Topics Lab (1.00 Credit)

ESS-400   Senior Capstone I (Fall; Yearly; 1.00-3.00 Credits; S,CTGIS) The Senior Capstone course is intended to provide a real-world, project-based experience working on an advanced-level project. The student teams utilize skills they have acquired in their academic career to evaluate and provide potential solutions to realistic environmental tasks. The project will be chosen each semester based on needs and opportunities in local agencies to provide an advanced project that can be done in one semester. Prerequisite: Senior standing or permission of the instructor.

ESS-401   Senior Capstone II (Spring; Yearly; 1.00-3.00 Credits; N,S,CTGIS) This course is the spring semester Senior Capstone option. It is intended to provide a real-world, project-based experience working on an advanced-level project. The student teams utilize skills they have acquired in their academic career to evaluate and provide potential solutions to realistic environmental tasks. The project will be chosen each year based on needs and opportunities in local agencies to provide an advanced project that can be done in one year. Prerequisite: ESS-100 and Senior standing or instructor permission.

ESS-410   Water Resources II (Spring; Odd Years; 3.00 Credits; QS,N,CTGIS) This is an advanced hydrology course aimed at furthering the students understanding of the complex interactions of the hydrologic cycle. Particular emphasis will be placed on mathematically modeling the process including precipitation, runoff, infiltration, soil moisture and stream flow. Prerequisites: ESS310 and MA130

ESS-415   Fate & Transport of Pollutants (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits) The course is designed to provide an understanding of the physical, chemical, and biological processes that govern the distribution of contaminants through the environment, as well as the processes that are involved in the transformation or degradation of a contaminant. Knowledge of these processes is essential for designing pollution prevention, control, monitoring, and remediation strategies, and for risk assessment. We will cover the distribution of pollutants in air, water, soil, and biological tissues, with particular emphasis on toxic organic pollutants.

ESS-445   Fishery Science & Management (Fall; Odd Years; 4.00 Credits; H,N,QS) This course is a survey of the elements of fisheries science and management including the biology, ecology, management, and conservation of fisheries and aquatic resources. Emphasis is on whole ecosystem approaches to ecology and management of inland freshwater fisheries of North America and associated habitats. Prerequisites: BI-101 or BI-105 and BI-102 or BI-121 or permission of instructor.

ESS-450   Environmental Research (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00-6.00 Credits; S) An independent research experience that includes the preparation of a research proposal. Students present research results during weekly meetings with instructor. A research paper is the end point of the research experience. Presentation of results at national meetings is encouraged. May be repeated for up to 15 credits. Prerequisite: ESS100 and ESS300 and permission of the instructor.

ESS-460   Coastal Zone Management (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Taught in India. This course will cover the current legal status, international treaties, state and central government coastal zone management regulations, and the history and current status of conflict and the attempts to overcome that conflict in India. This includes shrimp farming, over fishing, pollution, shipping, oil spills changes in beach morphology and coastal topography from weirs dams, etc. Prerequisites: GL111 and ESS100.

ESS-490   Environmental Science and Studies Internship (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 2.00-9.00 Credits; N) Note: May be repeated up to a total of 9 hours of credit. Prerequisite: Permission and Jr. or Sr. Standing. Corequisite: ESS495.

ESS-495   ESS Research Seminar (Either Semester; Yearly; 2.00-6.00 Credits; N) Requires students to reflect on experience and/or pursue relevant research. Corequisite: ESS490. Prerequisite: Permission and Jr. Sr. standing.

ESS-499   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits) Allows the departments to offer special topics not normally offered. Departments may offer more than one special topic. Prerequisites vary by title.

ESS-TUT   ESS Teaching Assistant (Variable; Variable; 1.00-3.00 Credits; N)

Geology

Department Website:

https://www.juniata.edu/academics/departments/geology/

Faculty:

Background Information:

Geology is the science that explores the dynamic processes and history of the earth. Juniata’s geology students gain skills necessary to enter a wide variety of professional arenas, including: environmental services and consulting, geotechnical engineering services, state and federal agencies, mineral and petroleum exploration, natural resource management, planetary science, education, and natural hazards management and mitigation. Upon completion of undergraduate degrees, many Juniata geology students continue their education through graduate studies, while others enter directly into professional careers.

Special programs, facilities, or equipment:

Programs of Emphasis:

Secondary Emphasis:

Internship/Research Experiences:

Courses:

GL-100   Intro to Physical Geology (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) An introduction to the principles and methods of geology. Emphasis is placed on the geologic forces at work in our physical environment. Topics covered include internal processes such as volcanism, earthquakes, mountain building and the flow of groundwater as well as external processes such as landslides, flooding, erosion and landscape formation. Emphasis is given to the interaction of human activities with these physical processes as well as the processes themselves.

GL-100A   Environmental Geology (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) Student perceptions of what constitutes geology have shifted. Contemporary students need to be made aware that geology IS the study of the physical environment of the earth and that a central part of what geologists do entails an exploration of how humans and the built environment both affect and are affected by the earth's physical/environmental system. While our previous title and description for this course, Introduction to Physical Geology, carried these implicit understandings, we find it important now to draw students' attention explicitly to the environmental character of our study of Earth.

GL-101   Physical Geology Lab (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; N) This course provides opportunities to study geology in the laboratory and field. Concepts and methods covered in the lecture are reinforced. Specifically covered are mineral and rock identification, map interpretation and study of examples of earth processes from maps and in the field. Some field trips are required and a special fee is assessed. Corequisite or Prerequisite: GL100A.

GL-111   Oceanography (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) A survey of the physical, chemical, biological and geological environments of the ocean. Included are sea floor topography, composition and circulation of sea water and the life existing in the oceanic environments. Field experience is offered and a special fee is assessed.

GL-114   Catastrophe (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N,WK-SP) This Scientific Process course explores the geological processes and hazards that lead to large and destructive natural disasters. Students will explore and work with interdisciplinary scientific data to understand the importance and societal relevance of earth processes in everyday decision making. Pre-req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

GL-123   Expedition: Earth (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) This course explores the full range of geologic studies through weekly meetings in the spring semester to prepare for a two to three-week field expedition in May-June. The field trip is supported by the Geology Alumni Field Trip fund. Each year, the class will travel to a different region in the US or internationally.

GL-126   Environmental Geochemistry (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; N) This course will introduce fundamental geologic process through a geochemical lens. Basic geochemical reactions involving water-rock interactions at both high and low temperatures will be considered. The class will focus on the environmental problems in atmosphere and continents. Prereq: CH114.

GL-130   Introduction to Soils (Fall; Variable; 4.00 Credits; N) Introduction to Soils is an experience-driven overview of the most important distinctions among soils and to the factors that contribute to agricultural productivity of soils. Through in-class activities students will learn to be observers of soil characteristics, and will come to understand soil as the interface between the worlds of rocks, plant and animal life, the water cycle and the atmosphere. Attention will be drawn to natural and disturbed soils, and soils' role in global health. No prerequisites.

GL-172   Geology of National Parks (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N,WK-SP) A Scientific Process course that explores geological processes that formed the landscape of the United States through the lens of our national parks. Students will learn how to read, use, interpret, and collect earth science data to approach scientific problems and public policy decisions. Field trip to National Park required unless course is taken online; special fee assessed for field trip. PRE-REQ: FYC 101.

GL-199   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) An examination of an area not regularly studied in the departmental offerings. Examples have been Geomorphology, Petroleum Geology, and Case Studies in Environmental Geology. Note: abbreviate ST: (title) students may take each ST: Course for credit.

GL-204   History of Earth (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N,WK-SP) This course examines the history of the planet Earth since its origin to the present day and the methods that geologists use to uncover that history. The course includes specific consideration of the social context of geosciences, and ways that art and science have contributed to human understanding of Earth. Pre-req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109

GL-210   Minerals (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N,WK-SP) This course explores the building blocks of the Earth: minerals. Students will master mineral identification in hand-specimen and by optical microscope methods to conduct scientific inquiry. Emphasis is placed on mineral classification, crystal structure, chemical composition, physical properties, and stability. We also investigate the role of minerals in society and public policy. A lab fee is assessed. Pre-req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

GL-213   Minerals, Economics, Politics and Law (Either Semester; Odd Years; 3.00 Credits; I) Introduces mineral deposits and examines the distribution and exploitation. Explores historical patterns in mineral resource utilization and considers the extractive industries in the context of economic patterns and government policies. Emphasizes the potential for conflict resulting from the uneven distribution and exploitation of mineral wealth. Note: some field trips are required. (A Peace and Conflict Studies course.) Note: this course does not fulfill the distribution requirement in science.

GL-215   Energy, Minerals & Society (Fall; Variable; 3.00 Credits; N) Twenty-first century societies run on the twin nutrients of abundant energy and the mineral resources needed to fashion technological devices. While both energy and mineral commodities are subject to wildly oscillating demand as economies alternately flourish and falter, the global demand for all such commodities has shown inexorable growth since the onset of the industrial era. Globalization has increased this rate of growth. But, extraction and use of resources invariably alters landscapes and releases pollutants into the environment. How adequate are supplies? How can they be used with minimal adverse impact? To what extent can impacts be managed by use of alternative energies, by recycling, by conservation? These topics are the focus of this course.

GL-240   Geological Field Methods I (Fall; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N,CW,CTGIS) This course is an introduction to the geology of the Appalachians through teaching geologic methods in the field. The course will focus on developing field practice and using the information collected in the field to construct a scientific document. The course is composed of 8 local field trips and 1 extended field trip as well as many classroom exercises.

GL-299   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) An examination of an area not regularly studied in the departmental offerings. Examples have been Geomorphology, Petroleum Geology, and Case Studies in Environmental Geology. Note: abbreviate ST: (title). Students may take each ST: course for credit.

GL-300   Petrography (Fall; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N) The petrographic examination of rocks in hand specimen and under the microscope. Identification of the principal types of igneous and metamorphic rocks and discussion of their chemical and mineralogical characteristics and tectonic setting is emphasized. Note: one laboratory per week, one or two major field trips are required, and a special fee is assessed. Prerequisite: GL210.

GL-304   Paleobiology of Invertebrates (Fall; Odd Years; 4.00 Credits; N) Basic principles of paleontology and functional morphology of extant and extinct invertebrates are covered. These include identifying fossils and understanding their morphology and preservation in order to interpret ancient environments. Note: One laboratory per week and field trips are required and a special fee is assessed. Prerequisites: GL202 or BI105.

GL-305   Hydrogeology (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; N) The study of the natural occurrence of water. Topics include: the hydrologic cycle, precipitation, stream flow, soil moisture, ground water occurrence, aquifer flow and testing chemical characteristics, contamination, development and management of ground-water resources.

GL-307   Geophysics (Fall; Even Years; 3.00 Credits; N) This course is an introduction to how geophysical data can be used to address academic and applied problems in geology. Emphasis is placed on the concepts behind acquiring geophysical data and use of the information for interpretation. Seismology, magnetism, heat and gravity are the main concepts covered. Prerequisites: GL202. MA130 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite. There are two field trips run over the weekend where students get to use the equipment in the field and reduce the data. A special fee is assessed.

GL-310   Structural Geology (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) The study of the deformation of the earth's crust. Field relationships, form, symmetry, and geometry of earth structures are stressed. Concepts of kinematic and dynamic analysis are presented so students are better prepared to interpret the origin of earth structures. Note: one laboratory per week, one or two extended field trips are required, and a special fee is assessed. Prerequisite: GL-202 or GL-204.

GL-325   Intro to Soil Science (Spring; Variable; 4.00 Credits; N) Introduction to Soil Science is a comprehensive overview of soils, their characteristics, their origins, their importance to agriculture, construction and waste disposal, and of the factors that contribute to maintenance of soil quality or to its degradation in use. Theoretical concepts will be supported by laboratory and field study of soils, soil forming processes, and soil-water-rock-biotic interactions; training will be provided in techniques of field sampling and characterization of soils. A special lab fee is assessed. Prerequisites: GL100 & GL101 & CH105.

GL-350   Geol. Research Methodologies (Spring; Yearly; 2.00 Credits) Aims to elucidate the science research process and the science infrastructure to the student. The course introduces students to research practice, analysis and writing. The course also requires students to prepare a research proposal. Students will also discuss more theoretical aspects of research: epistemology, the scientific method, multiple working hypotheses, erecting and testing hypotheses, and the scientific infrastructure. This course is designed for junior level geology students.Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

GL-389   Geology Professional Seminar (Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit) Provides guidance and preparation to Junior class level Geology students in relation to their post-Juniata plans. Topics include resume writing, strategies involved in a job or graduate school search, preparation for credentialing exams, preparation for interviews, and networking. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing.

GL-399   Special Topics (Either Semester; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) An examination of an area not regularly studied in the departmental offerings. Examples have been Geomorphology, Petroleum Geology, and Case Studies in Environmental Geology. Note: abbreviate ST:(title). Students may take each ST: course for credit.

GL-400   Petrology of Igneous and Metamorphic Rocks (Spring; Even Years; 4.00 Credits; N) Analyzes the processes of magma generation and crystallization under equilibrium and disequilibrium conditions in the context of igneous phase equilibria and geologic setting. Considers the re-crystallization of pre-existing mineral assemblages in the metamorphic environments and examines metamorphic conditions by interpretation of facies assmeblages and petrogenetic grids. Note: one laboratory per week; a major field trip is required and a special fee is assessed. Prerequisite: GL 300.

GL-401   Sedimentology (Fall; Even Years; 4.00 Credits; N) Focuses on the origin of sediments and sedimentary rocks. Included are sedimentary processes, depositional environments, post-depositional influences and sedimentary rock classification. Principles and methods of study including petrographic analysis are emphasized. Note: one laboratory per week, field trips are required, including a weekend trip, and a special fee is assessed. Prerequisite: GL202.

GL-405   Principles of Stratigraphy (Spring; Odd Years; 4.00 Credits; CW,N) Includes the description of sedimentary rocks in the stratigraphic column, methods of correlation, interpretation of the origin of rock units and the historical and philosophical development of the geologic time scale. Note: one laboratory per week, field trips are required and a special fee is assessed. Prerequisite: GL202.

GL-414   Geologic Research Method (Fall & Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits) The course focuses on exploring geologic research method development, data collection and management, data interpretation and professional presentation of scientific information.

GL-440   Geological Field Methods II (Spring; Variable; 4.00 Credits; N) The course covers advanced geologic mapping of the Appalachians. It will focus on constructing geologic maps and cross-sections to develop an understanding of the rock record, geologic time, and the processes by which geologists reconstruct ancient tectonic and sedimentary events. The course is field based. Prerequisites: GL 240. Note: A special course fee will be applied.

GL-450   Geological Research (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00-6.00 Credits; N) The field or laboratory investigation of a specific geologic problem. Methodology and principles of interpretation are necessary for the successful completion of the course and a final report must be submitted. Student's specific research topic will be the title of the course on the student's transcript. May be completed multiple times for credit. Prerequisite: permission of Geology faculty member.

GL-490   Geology Internship (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 2.00-9.00 Credits; N) See the chapter, " Special Programs " under Internships. Prerequisite: Permission and Jr. or Sr. standing. Corequisite: GL495.

GL-495   Internship Research/Seminar (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00-6.00 Credits; N) Requires students to reflect on the internship experience and/or pursue research related to the placement. Corequisite: GL 490. Prerequisite: permission.

Health Communication

Faculty:  Interdisciplinary (BI, CS, CM, EN, PL, PY, SO)

Professor: Dr. Grace Fala

Fala@juniata.edu Ext. 3467

Background Information:

Health Communication is the study of communication as it relates to health professionals and health education. It includes the study of provider-client interaction as well as the diffusion of health information through public health campaigns.

Special programs, facilities, or equipment:

Programs of Emphasis:

Individualized Programs of Emphasis:

Secondary Emphasis:

Internship/Research Experiences:

    Internship examples from former Juniata Students

Courses:

History and Anthropology

Department Website:

https://www.juniata.edu/academics/departments/history/

Faculty:

Background Information:

The department offers a core of survey courses and builds this base with other courses emphasizing the social, economic, political, and cultural aspects of the past.  Our strengths are in European, British Empire, Asian and U.S. studies. The department provides sound preparation for a wide variety of vocational interests, including those of historian, teacher, and lawyer, as well as those in business and government. We have a strong History and Museum Studies program.  In addition to traditional survey courses, the department offers selected in-depth studies (e.g., seminars on Environmental History, the Pacific War, Medieval Medicine, and The Great War).

Special programs:

Programs of Emphasis:

Individualized Programs of Emphasis:

Internship/Research Experiences:

Specific department policy:

Awarding credit for AP Exam scores: A student with an AP score of 4 will receive 3 General Elective Non-Department credits, as it will not equate to history elective.

A student with an AP score of 5 will see the Department Chair for review to determine what credit will be awarded. The student may receive general history credit or a direct equate to a Juniata History Course. 

HS-104   Medieval Europe (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H,I,WK-HT) This course will examine the history of Western Europe from the Roman Empire to approximately 1450. This 1000-year period was the setting for both large and small changes in the way people in Europe thought about themselves, governed each other, and lived everyday lives. During the course, we will follow a chronological timeline, but we will frequently stop, look, and enjoy the scenery. Pre- or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109. (Formerly titled: European History to 1550)

HS-109   China, Japan, and Korea to 1800 (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H,I) Introduces students to the major themes in the histories of China, Japan, and Korea from antiquity to about 1800. Special emphasis will be paid to the religious and philosophical foundations of Confucian civilization.

HS-115   United States to 1877 (Fall; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H) Concentrates on the broad sweep of U.S. history from colonial beginnings through Reconstruction using a variety of perspectives and sources. The ideas and realities of freedom shape nearly every part of our lives. How did this develop in the United States from its earliest European settlements to the aftermath of the Civil War? HS-115 focuses on this central theme of freedom - how people have defined and pursued it, as well as expanded and restricted it, in different places. You will also learn how to analyze primary sources (those created during the time period under study)and apply a historical perspective to issues that shape your life today.

HS-116   The U.S. Since 1877 (Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H) This course uses original documents, novels, and other sources to explore the interrelationships between domestic and foreign affairs and to examine the consequences of actions taken at the national and local level.

HS-152   World Civilizations From 1500 (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H,I) This course will trace the developmentof world civilizations from the 16th century to the present.

HS-199   Special Topics (Fall; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows the department to offer special topics not normally offered. Departments may offer more than one special topic. Prerequisites vary by title.

HS-200   The Great War (Variable; Variable; 4.00 Credits; I,H,CW,WK-HT) This class is a social, cultural, and political history of a global conflict that reshaped the twentieth century. Throughout the semester we will seek to understand what it was like for soldiers and civilians from many parts of the world to live thought this war. Pre- or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

HS-201   Samurai Legends & Lives (Either Semester; Variable; 4.00 Credits; CA,H,I) In this course, students analyze the ways in which the mythic images of the samurai warriors of Japan have been constructed in both Japan and the West. Students will read medieval Japanese war tales, administrative and legal documents, memoirs and reminiscences, puppet plays, and view films to understand how these ideas and images were created, and changed, through time. Prerequisites: EN110 or EN109.

HS-204   Australia/New Zealand (Either Semester; Variable; 4.00 Credits; I,H) This course is a comparative introduction to the history of New Zealand and Australia. We will begin the course by studying the indigenous people of the region: Australian Aborigines in Australia and Maoris in New Zealand, before moving to think about the arrival of white settlers. During the semester, we will pay particular attention to the process of colonization and dispossession, race and gender relations, the search for national identity, popular culture, and politics in the two countries.

HS-213   History of Ireland (Variable; Variable; 4.00 Credits; H,WK-HT) This course is an introduction to the history of Ireland, beginning with an overview of the early history. We will explore the Tudor revolutions, English colonialism, the question of identity in the island, Irish Republicanism. home rule movements, the partition of Ireland, and the " troubles " in the North of the island of Ireland. Pre-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109

HS-215   Rome: Republic to Empire (Variable; Variable; 4.00 Credits; H,WK-HT) People through history have imagined Rome in different ways, and it conjures up lots of different images for us: civilization; barbarism; conquest; freedom; slavery; technology; virtue and vice. In this course, we will explore the period between the founding of Roman civilization and the year 325 A.D., examining what the Romans thought and said about themselves and what they mean to us today.

HS-217   The Lowcountry and the Gullah Culture (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; H,CA,SW-US) The course examines the origins and development of the Gullah Geechee cultures of the Lowcountry. How did these members of the African diaspora develop a creole culture within the profound and brutal limitations of slavery, and how did they sustain it and change under Jim Crow and into the climate and development challenges of the present?

HS-222   Archives: Theory, Practice, and Use (2.00 Credits) This team-taught course provides an introduction to archives by covering their different types and purposes, archival practices, and the use of archives by researchers. The course will involve readings, discussion, hands-on experiences, and a field trip. This course also serves a crucial role in the orientation to, and skill development for, the larger Secondary Emphasis and certificate in Rural Poverty Studies.

HS-262   North American Environmental History (Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; H) Our troubling relationship with the natural world might well be the most important issue human societies will face in your lifetime. HS-262 examines one root of this relationship: how and why we have shaped, and been shaped by, different North American environments over time. Through discussion, lectures, readings, and films, we will examine the social, cultural, economic, and political spheres of these human activities since the fifteenth century.

HS-266   History of South Africa (Variable; Variable; 4.00 Credits; I,H) This course covers the history of South Africa from the 17th century to the present. We will focus our attention on specific themes, including imperialism, race and ethnicity, crime and punishment, resistance to apartheid, and the limits of forgiveness. The class will be taught inside SCI Smithfield. This Inside-Out Course is an opportunity for a group of students from Juniata College and an equal number of students from SCI Smithfield to learn together and to exchange ideas and perceptions about the history of South Africa. Bringing incarcerated and non-incarcerated students together for engaged and informed dialogue allows for transformative learning experiences that facilitates an exchange of ideas in a dialogic format. Instructor permission required for all students.

HS-268   Sword & Scimitar: Islam & West 500-1300 (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; SW-GE) When discussing culture in a historical context, we must be careful to avoid the stereotypes that may leap to mind. In the twenty-first-century United States, the mention of Islam or the Near East provokes stereotypes that are inaccurate and misleading. In this course, we will learn about the early history of Islam and its intersection with western Christianity and the society of the European Middle Ages. In doing so we will discover the similarities and differences between the cultures and learn (modern prejudices notwithstanding) how they depended on one another both culturally and economically.

HS-272   Natives & Colonists in Early N. America (Variable; Variable; 4.00 Credits; H,CW,SW-US) Love, hate, fear, confusion, respect, admiration, wonder: these are just some of the powerful feelings that infused the relationships between Native Americans and European colonists, and that shaped the history of North America from about 1500 to the eve of the American Revolution. Through extensive discussion, reading, writing, and a role-playing game, HS-272 will help you understand relationships that still affect American society today.

HS-277   History of Food (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H) This course will take a transnational view of the history of food from the Middle Ages to the twenty-first century. We will examine food as a part of human experience including its roles as sustenance, commodity, cultural artifact, signifier of identity, and art. While the early emphasis of the course will be on the Atlantic World and the global exchange of foods and cooking techniques, particular attention will be on the United States' regional cuisines and food movements. The course will use scholarly texts, films, field-trips and will require some cooking and tasting of food on some evenings. Prerequisites: Sophomore Standing. Note: There is a fee assessed on this course.

HS-280   Victorian Science, Sexuality & Medicine (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; WK-HT,H) This class investigates the changing meanings and entanglements of Victorian science and medical practice through the lens of class, gender, and race. We will examine ideas about the body and disease, the changing role of medicine and the social construction of scientific knowledge. Pre- or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

HS-293   Sophomore Colloquium (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H,CW) This colloquium exposes students to employment opportunities available to them through the study of history. It focuses upon the development of the skills necessary for success in the history classroom. The Sophomore Colloquium is designed for students with strong interest in history, including education students and students with secondary emphases in history. Pre-requisites: sophomore standing and two courses in History or permission of the instructor.

HS-299   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Offers supplements to the regular departmental program, exploring topics and areas not regularly scheduled. Note: Students may take each ST: course for credit.

HS-305   The American Revolution (Spring; Variable; 4.00 Credits; H,CW,WK-HT) The American Revolution reshaped the world by spreading the idea of independence, and it continues to influence our lives in every way, from debating the rights of citizenship to including Hamilton on your playlist. HS-305 examines the origins and consequences of the American Revolution. The central questions include: What caused the American Revolution? How did the United States win the War of Independence? What resulted from the American Revolution? Class activities include extensive discussion, reading, and a role-playing game.

HS-306   People's Republic of China (Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; I,H,CW) This course is an upper-level seminar on the history of the Chinese Communist Party and the People's Republic of China. This is a College Writing course (CW), so a principle aim of the course is to instruct students in the techniques of writing papers in history. Work in the course will culminate in a term paper on a topic in 20th-century Chinese History. To that end, considerable effort will be spent in introducing students to tools and strategies for understanding the English-language historiography of Modern China. Some prior knowledge of Chinese history and civilization is recommended.

HS-309   Civil War and Reconstruction (Variable; Variable; 4.00 Credits; H,CW,CTDH) Examines the political, social, military, economic and ideological origins and consequences of the Civil War and Reconstruction. The course looks deeply into several important questions. What caused the Civil War? Why was the Union victorious? Why did the war proceed as it did? What was the nature and legacy of reconstruction? What does this period in our history mean to us now? Prerequisites: HS115 or HS116 and SO, JR, or SR standing.

HS-312   The New South: 1877-1990 (Variable; Variable; 4.00 Credits; H) This seminar will cover the years 1877-1900 and explore the themes on the cultural, political, economic and social history of the U.S. South. Among the important questions covered in the class are: What is the South? How did the South change through significant events such as the Populist movement, the rise of Jim Crow, the Great Depression, the second World War, economic development, and the Civil Rights movement. We will ask how the South's arts, especially music, reflect its history and culture. Prerequisites: HS116 or permission of the instructor.

HS-313   Disease, Medicine, and Empire (Either Semester; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; CA,I,H,SW-GE,CTGES) Despite our popular understanding of the European middle ages as a dirty, disease-ridden, hopelessly backward period, the sources show us quite a different picture. A lack of understanding of the means of genetic change and the cause of viral and bacterial disease caused medieval people to understand the human body very differently than we do, but their medical systems were not without logic and efficacy. Pre- or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

HS-314   Medieval Medicine (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H,CW,SW-GE,CTGES) Despite our popular understanding of the European middle ages as a dirty, disease-ridden, hopelessly backward period, the sources show us quite a different picture. Although a lack of understanding of the means of genetic change and the cause of viral and bacterial disease caused medieval people to understand the human body very differently than we do, that system was not without its logic and efficacy. This course will explore the human body and its diseases in the middle ages through a series of connected readings that introduce the body as a conceptual system and medieval science's attempts to understand it. We will then look at the growing field of genomic research as a way of understanding and comparing our modern systems of understanding the body.

HS-316   WWII in Asia and Pacific (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; I,H) Students will study Japan's war in Asia & the Pacific (1937-45), China's War to Resist Japanese Aggression (1937-45) and the US in the Pacific War (1941-45), all part of the larger world-historical conflict. The war will be examined from the perspectives of the main combatants, but also from the perspective of colonial subjects, and from the points of view of elites and commoners. Much attention will be paid to roles of race and culture in (mis-)understandings of " the enemy. "

HS-320   Interpreting Terrorism (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; SW-ER) You have grown up in a world shaped by terrorism. How did this happen? What is terrorism, how has it developed, and how have people responded to it? In this course, we will analyze (interpret) terrorism from different directions: its many definitions, its general history beginning with the French Revolution, and the many ways in which people have responded to it. You will also dive into specific topics and present (interpret) your research for a non-academic audience. It is important for us historians to communicate effectively. If we can broaden and deepen the public's understanding of, and appreciation for, the past, we enrich our society. You will learn how to convey your knowledge in a way that the public will find accessible, and even enjoyable or exciting. Course requirements include a field trip.

HS-322   Women's Lives-Medieval Europe (Variable; Variable; 4.00 Credits; H,CW) What could medieval women do? What was it like to be a nun? Who were witches? There are many interesting questions to ask about women in the middle ages, their choices, and their experiences. In this course, we will address them through firsthand accounts from biographies, personal diaries, and literature.

HS-325   The U.S. Since 1945 (Either Semester; Variable; 4.00 Credits; H) Covers the social, political and economic history since the Second World War. Themes include: the Cold War, suburbanization, the rise of consumer society, and more. Prerequisite: HS116.

HS-326   Modern China (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H,I) China over the past hundred years has played a major role in global affairs and is positioned to remain a dominant presence well into the 21st century. This course examines the rise of modern China focusing on its transition from a traditional Confucian state to a potent economic and political power.

HS-327   Modern Japan (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; H,I) This course traces the history of Japan's rise as a modern nation state beginning with the Meiji Restoration of 1868 up to the present with an emphasis on the cultural, economic and political factors which aided the rapid industrialization in the nineteenth century, Japanese imperialism in the first half of the twentieth century, and Japan's economic " miracle " in postwar Japan.

HS-367   Women in Africa (Variable; Variable; 4.00 Credits; CA,H,I,CTDH) This course will provide students with an understanding of women in sub-Saharan African cultures, their history, traditions, diversity, resilience and adaptability. To do this we will be looking at social structure, kinship networks, economic systems, gender relations, ethnicity and ethnic conflicts, traditional religion, the HIV/AIDS epidemic and other health issues.

HS-399   Special Topics (Either Semester; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Provides supplements to the regular departmental program, exploring topics and areas not regularly scheduled. Note: Students may take each ST: course for credit.

HS-400   Crimes Against Humanity (Spring; Variable; 4.00 Credits; I,H) This course explores the emergence, evolution, varieties, underlying causes, and means of confronting and coming to terms with genocide and other crimes against humanity. During the course of the semester, we will examine a range of historical contexts and we will also confront tough questions about ethics, resistance, and responsibility. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing. Sophomores require permission.

HS-490   History Internship (Variable; Yearly; 2.00-9.00 Credits; H) Prerequisite: Instructor permission and Junior or Senior standing. Co-requisite: HS-495.

HS-492   Sr History Research/Seminar I (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; H) Serves as a capstone experience that synthesizes materials from history and other disciplines into a substantial written thesis. The senior seminar can be done as an independent study or in conjunction with an internship. When completed the thesis is presented at a public oral defense. Prerequisite: Completion of all core courses and/or permission of instructor.

HS-493   The Historian's Craft (Fall; Variable; 1.00 Credit; H,CW) This course is a seminar-style introduction to historiography and a forum in which senior history students complete part or all of their senior thesis. Students taking the course are expected to work simultaneously with the course instructor, as well as a thesis advisor from within the history department. Students may select a member of the faculty outside the department as a secondary advisor if that complements their thesis topic. Students who elect to write a year-long thesis take HS496 in the Spring semester after taking HS493. Students from other departments who take the course will be expected to complete a paper of comparable length to a senior thesis under the supervision of the course instructor. Prerequisites: One 300 level history course and Senior status.

HS-495   History Internship Seminar (Variable; Yearly; 2.00-6.00 Credits; H) Requires students to reflect on the internship experience and/or pursue relevant research. Instructor permission required. Corequisite: HS-490.

HS-496   Senior History Research/Seminar II (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; H) If a student needs to work further on the senior thesis, this will allow three further hours of study. Prerequisites: HS493 and Senior standing.

HS-499   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows departments to offer topics not normally taught. Prerequisites and corequisites vary by topic.

HS-TUT   History Teaching Assistant (Variable; Variable; 1.00-3.00 Credits)

Information Technology and Computer Science

Department Website:

https://www.juniata.edu/academics/departments/it-computers-media/

Faculty:

Background Information:

The Information Technology program prepares students to be leaders in the field of Information Technology. The common characterization of an information technologist is as the “user’s advocate” in the computing world. Information technologists approach technology from the user’s point of view rather than from the technology’s point of view and tend to think of technology and computing as powerful tools for solving problems rather than ends in themselves. IT students tend to care more about how people use computers for solutions than about how computers work “under the hood.” Information Technology complements existing programs in Business, Computer Science, and Communication, and can be combined with widely varied programs such as Theatre with Integrated Media Arts, Environmental Science with the GIS certificate and Biology with the Genomics Leadership certificate.

The Business and Information Technology program combines key elements of the IT program and Business from the Accounting Business and Economics department.

The program in Computer Science develops problem solving and analytical skills through the study and implementation of algorithms, systems design and software development on modern computation platforms and provides for students to skills that adapt well to the fast changing technologies of today and the future. The Computer Science program is recommended for those students considering graduate work in the technology fields.

The Integrated Media Arts program is a flexible interdisciplinary POE combining areas in IT, Communication, and Arts that prepares student for work in varied media production careers. Students can focus their programs in the creative, critical analysis or technology management aspects of digital media.

Special programs, facilities, or equipment:

Programs of Emphasis:

Secondary Emphasis:

Internship/Research Experiences:

The Interdisciplinary CORE courses required for the Information Technology POE

The CORE courses required for Computer Science POE

The CORE courses required for Integrated Media Arts POE

The CORE courses required for Business and IT POE

IT-105   Principles of Programming (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N,WK-FR) This course introduces the fundamental principles of programming. Initially, a visual programming language will be used to provide an introduction to algorithmic problem-solving. Then a web-based programming language will be used to illustrate programming language constructs. In addition, the ethical concerns of algorithmic bias will be explored, from the frame of Social Inquiry. Pre-Req or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109

IT-110   Principles of Information Technology (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) This course provides a context for further study in information technology. Topics include an overview of the fundamentals of information systems, current and emerging technologies, business applications, communications and decision making, and the impact of these systems on business, government, and society. This course will also emphasize the development of both writing and speaking skills through application of the concepts that define the course.

IT-199   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows the department to offer special topics not normally offered. Departments may offer more than one special topic. Prerequisites vary by title.

IT-210   Information Technology Systems (Fall; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N) This course introduces students to three core areas in Information Technology: networks, database and web. The course progresses through two phases during its study of modern IT environments. Initial study includes all the necessary components of today's IT system environment and its use in business. Secondly, students use a server based database development environment to create an IT system. Prerequisites: CS110. MA116 strongly recommended.

IT-260   Human-Computer Interaction (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S,WK-SI) Human-Computer Interaction is a multidisciplinary field with the goal of bringing usability into the design process and to develop interactive products that are easy, effective, and enjoyable to use from a user'sperspective. Human interaction with interfaces can be studied, designed, and evaluated. While HCI focuses on technology design, the user-centered design techniques can be used in the creation of any product in all fields of study. Pre- or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109

IT-298   Information Technology Practicum I (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00-4.00 Credits; S) Credit option for students who are applying their classroom theory from the department by working on information technology or digital media projects on campus or off-campus. Credit hours and level (298, 398 or 498) are dependent upon the extent of the project and will be determined by the professor. Available by permission only.

IT-299   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows the department to offer special topics not normally offered. Departments may offer more than one special topic. Prerequisites vary by title.

IT-306   Software Engineering (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) See CS300. Prerequisite: CS240.

IT-307   Project Management (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S,CW,CS,SW-LE) This course reviews and applies project management processes and techniques such as project life cycle, project selection methods, work breakdown instructions, network diagrams, cost estimates, and more. Prerequisites: IT210 and Jr or Sr standing or permission of the instructor. Corequisite: IT308.

IT-308   Innovations for Industry I (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; S) This lab will require a team of students to function as a project development team for an IT- related business. The students will be exposed to many aspects of systems analysis, design, development and implementation, as well as project management tools and techniques. Students will be required to learn in a just-in-time mode using on-demand educational resources. Prerequisites: IT210 and Jr or Sr standing or by permission of the instructor. Corequisite: IT307. Note: This course will have appointed class times for projects other thanthe times listed on the schedule.

IT-310   Social Media (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; F) This course will introduce students to the context and forms of social media. We will explore the theories and practices of narrative expression in online context, explore social media as culture and study the impact of " the sharing economy. " What is social media, who uses it, who gains from it, and how is it transforming new media as well as traditional media. One of the outcomes of social media is that everything is connected, creating massive amounts of user generated content and data. Students will learn to analyze, design and visualize this data. We will also focus on the social norms of user communities and how we can leverage it to better understand emerging technologies. Students will have the opportunity to explore both theory and practice of social media through writing assignments, presentations, curating and creating creative content, and participating on both online and offline discussions. Prerequisites: IT110 or IT111 or IM110.

IT-325   Network Design & Management. (Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N) Focuses on the concept of the foundations of a network in both design and support. The OSI reference model will be examined along with techniques for supporting current technologies that align with each other. Emphasis will be placed on protocols, topologies and traffic analysis. Prerequisites: CS240 or IT210.

IT-341   Web Design (Fall; Yearly; 2.00 Credits) A study of modern web design along with an examination of markup and scripting languages (e.g., HTML, JavaScript), page, image and multimedia formats, and the techniques in developing and managing a web site. Page design, graphical user interfaces, interactive techniques and the importance of e-commerce are also emphasized. Prerequisites: CS110 or permission.

IT-342   Web Programming (Fall; Yearly; 2.00 Credits) A study of the modern web programming environment, including introduction to Web 2.0 and Web 3.0, HTML, XHTML, and JavaScript. The class will address client-side scripting as well as server-side technology, and accessing a database. These technologies will be combined to create an active, dynamic web page. Prerequisite: CS-240. Corequisite: IT-341.

IT-350   Security Engineering (Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; N) This course will focus on the area of computer security. Included will be information on attacks, prevention, as well as protection from non-malicious threats. It will look at network as well as web based security. A focus will be on creating secure computer environments from the ground up, not as an afterthought. Prerequisites: IT210 and junior standing or permission of the instructor.

IT-351   Security Engineering Lab (Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit) This course is a laboratory course with hands-on activities to supplement the instruction given in the IT350, Security Engineering course. The lab activities will center on digital forensics, hacker exploits and protection techniques, penetration testing and vulnerability analysis. Co-requisite IT350.

IT-380   Innovations for Industry II (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; S,CTGIS) See IT308. This course will have appointed class times for projects other than those listed on the schedule. A continuation of IT308. Prerequisites: IT307 & IT308 and senior standing.

IT-398   Information Technology Practicum II (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00-4.00 Credits; S) Credit option for students who are applying their classroom theory from the department by working on information technology or digital media projects on campus or off-campus. Credit hours and level (298, 398 or 498) are dependent upon the extent of the project and will be determined by the professor. Available by permission only.

IT-399   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows the department to offer special topics not normally offered. Departments may offer more than one special topic. Prerequisites vary by title.

IT-480   Innovations for Industry III (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; S,CTGIS) See IT380. This course will have appointed class times for projects other than those listed on the schedule. A continuation of IT380. Prerequisites: IT380 and senior standing.

IT-490   Information Technology Internship (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 2.00-9.00 Credits) See Internship in the catalog. Corequisite: IT495. Prerequisite: Jr. or Sr. standing.

IT-495   IT Internship Seminar (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 2.00-6.00 Credits) See Internship in the catalog. Corequisite: IT490.

IT-496   Information Technology Seminar (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; S) Discusses current advances in information technology not otherwise covered in our program such as, but not limited to, networking, artificial intelligence, societal issues. In addition, this course allows senior students to plan an individual research project to be completed in IT497. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing and IT210 or CS240.

IT-497   Information Technology Research (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00-5.00 Credits; S,CW) Allows students to carry out the independent technology research project as designed in IT496. Prerequisites: IT496.

IT-498   Information Technology Practicum III (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00-4.00 Credits; S) Credit option for students who are applying their classroom theory from the department by working on information technology or digital media projects on campus or off-campus. Credit hours and level (298, 398 or 498) are dependent upon the extent of the project and will be determined by the professor. Available by permission only.

IT-499   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows department to offer topics not normally taught. Prerequisites vary by title.

IT-TUT   IT Teaching Assistant (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Teachers Assistant

Integrated Media (IM) Courses:

IM-100   Integrated Media Art Seminar (Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; H) This one credit course is an introduction to the Integrated Media Arts program and its offerings in terms of areas of study, practicum, internships, on campus projects and programs abroad. Meeting the faculty and learning of their interests and research goals is essential to finding your place in the department. Opportunities for Study Abroad, Internships and networking with Alumni are all part of this practical course with opportunities for written reflection and presentations. Together we explore your best options in professional and graduate school opportunities to inform your choice of POE and plan your course of study.

IM-110   Principles of Digital Media (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; CTDH) An introduction to the concepts of digital media. Students will develop an understanding of the basics of digital media, the technology surrounding the creation and use of digital media, and its association with art, communication, and information technology. Through a laboratory context of experimentation and discussion, the course explores the use of various creative software programs used to create artistic and expressive media content. The course provides an overview of media formats, media creation, the fundamental properties of the tools required for media manipulation, and insight into the artistic, social, psychological, and legal aspects of digital media. Restrictions: IMA or Art POE or secondary emphasis, or by instructor permission.

IM-199   IM Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows department to offer topics not normally scheduled.

IM-242   Info Visualization (Fall; Variable; 3.00 Credits; N,CTDH,CTGES) This course considers the various aspects of presenting digital information for public consumption visually. Data formats from binary, text, various file types, to relational databases and web sites are covered to understand the framework of information retrieval for use in visualization tools. Visualization and graphical analyses of data are considered in the context of the human visual system for appropriate information presentation. Various open-source and commercial digital tools are considered for development of visualization projects. Prerequisite: IT 110, IT 111, IM 110, DS 110, or CS 110 or permission.

IM-250   Digital Audio Production (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; F,CTDH) Digital Audio Production introduces the student to the fundamentals of capturing, editing and reproducing sound, using digital tools. Hands on studio work combines with basic acoustic theory to help conceptualize the bridge between the analogue and digital worlds. The final project for the course puts the student in teams to record, edit, mix and do simple mastering on a full length CD.

IM-295   Design Thinking (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; F,WK-CE) This course is an introduction to design thinking as a powerful tool to approach real-world problems. Although design has traditionally been used to describe the process of creating visually appealing and communicative materials, in this course we will discuss how design can approach system thinking to solve the world's most challenging problems in a creative and innovative way. We will focus on changing the way we see a problem through a design thinking lens, learn to listen, engage in the design process, share our ideas in a team setting, identify ways to structure a group of key stakeholders, and find creative ways to apply design thinking methodologies to any problem. The student will learn the concepts that drive design thinking and ways to present your ideas in a persuasive way. Pre- or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

IM-298   Integrated Media Practicum I (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; SW-LE) Credit option for students who are applying their classroom theory by working on IMA projects on- or off-campus. Level (298, 398 or 498) is dependent upon the extent of the project and will be determined by the professor. By instructor permission only.

IM-310   Social Media (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; F) This course will introduce students to the context and forms of social media. We will explore the theories and practices of narrative expression in online context, explore social media as culture and study the impact of " the sharing economy. " What is social media, who uses it, who gains from it, and how is it transforming new media as well as traditional media. One of the outcomes of social media is that everything is connected, creating massive amounts of user generated content and data. Students will learn to analyze, design and visualize this data. We will also focus on the social norms of user communities and how we can leverage it to better understand emerging technologies. Students will have the opportunity to explore both theory and practice of social media through writing assignments, presentations, curating and creating creative content, and participating on both online and offline discussions. Prerequisites: IM110 or IT110 or IT111 or CS110.

IM-360   Digital Video Production (Spring; Even Years; 3.00 Credits; F,CTDH) Video Production I is a practical hands-on experience with cinematography, audio production, and lighting. Students learn the necessary skills to tell an well produced digital story with appropriate technical knowledge to enhance the narrative and audience engagement. This course will teach students how to work as a professional videographer by expanding digital media knowledge and techniques. Students will learn the technical foundations of video production, camera operation, lighting, audio acquisition and editing. Students will be encouraged to investigate the impact of video content based on the viewer in addition to artistic potential through digital storytelling. Prerequisites: IM110 or permission by permission of instructor with prior video experience.

IM-361   Video Production II (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; F,CTDH) Digital Video Production II allows students to work from ideas to a final video production that is ready to showcase at a film premiere, enter into film competitions, or share with a client as a professional commercial for their business. From preproduction planning all the way to post production editing, students will work on a series of videos with full creative rights. Students will be required to oversee planning, storyboarding, shooting, editing, and final exporting. Students with prior video production experience are preferred. Prerequisite: IM360 or by instructor permission.

IM-375   Community Design Lab (Fall; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; SW-LE,CTDH) Community Design Lab (formerly Integrated Media Arts Lab I) is a laboratory context of experimentation and discussion for students in the IMA Program. Students are given the opportunity to engage in a reciprocal partnership with a local community partner. Working in a team-driven environment with a local community partner students propose, plan, and complete a real-world design project. The course includes reflection, design deliverables, and client presentations throughout the semester. Prerequisite: IM-110, sophomore standing or higher.

IM-376   Business of Design (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) Business of Design (formerly Integrated Media Arts Lab II) is a laboratory context of experimentation and discussion for students in the IMA Program. The course explores the methods and practices of creative industry standards and professional business practices of being a creative entrepreneur in a competitive world. Students will work on multiple individually driven creative projects to find their personal brand including the development of their online presence as a self promotion tool. By the end of the semester students will understand the business side of creativity including ethical obligations, intellectual property, contracts, negotiation techniques, time tracking, and pricing in a business setting. Pre-Req: sophomore standing or higher.

IM-398   Integrated Media Practicum II (Either Semester; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; SW-LE) Credit option for students who are applying their classroom theory by working on IMA projects on- or off-campus. Level (298, 398 or 498) is dependent upon the extent of the project and will be determined by the professor. By instructor permission only.

IM-399   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits)

IM-490   IM Internship Need Paperwork (Variable; Yearly; 2.00-6.00 Credits) See catalog.

IM-495   Internship Seminar (Variable; Yearly; 2.00-9.00 Credits) See Catalog.

IM-496   IMA Seminar (Fall; All Years; 3.00 Credits) This course is designed to serve as a capstone course for seniors who emphasize Integrated Media Arts in their POE. Students are expected to examine design theory and research methods relevant to a topic, theme, issue, or problem that has served as an area of special interest. This course is intended to allow students to develop, compose, organize, revise, and edit their own writing. Through written assignments students will have the opportunity to produce a thesis or creative project. Students must have senior standing and have a POE in IMA (designated or individualized). Distinction may be achieved if the candidate meets the IMA Distinction requirements.

IM-497   IMA Research (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) This course is designed to serve as a capstone course for seniors who emphasize Integrated Media Arts in their POE. Students are expected to examine design theory and research methods relevant to a topic, theme, issue, or problem that has served as an area of special interest. This course is intended to allow students to develop, compose, organize, revise, and edit their own writing. Through written assignments students will have the opportunity to produce a thesis or creative project. Students must have senior standing and have a POE in IMA (designated or individualized). Distinction may be achieved if the candidate meets the IMA Distinction requirements.

IM-498   Integrated Media Practicum III (Either Semester; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; SW-LE) Credit option for students who are applying their classroom theory by working on IMA projects on- or off-campus. Level (298, 398 or 498) is dependent upon the extent of the project and will be determined by the professor. By instructor permission only.

IM-TUT   IMA Teaching Assistant (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits)

International Studies

Department Website:

https://www.juniata.edu/academics/departments/international-studies/

Core Faculty:

Associated Faculty:

Background Information:

An awareness of international issues and the ways in which people understand and fail to understand one another requires an appreciation of the complex interactions between the economic, social, political, and cultural variables that affect human existence. At Juniata, the International Studies Program involves a unique, interdisciplinary combination of common experiences, individualized areas of concentration, language study, study abroad and a cooperative research colloquium for seniors. Because International Studies is by nature interdisciplinary, the courses below represent a small sample of the courses available to students. International courses from several departments may be taken as part of an International Studies POE.

Program of Emphasis:

Individualized Programs of Emphasis:

Internship/Research Experiences:

Courses:

IS-105   World Regional Geography (Either Semester; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; I) A survey for the world's major cultural realms. Included are geographic setting, resources, environmental restrictions, historical and cultural traditions, industrial and agricultural development, economic base and trends, population distribution and political subdivisions.

IS-199   Special Topics (Fall; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; I) This seminar-style course, primarily intended for first-year students interested in International Studies, will explore the theory and history of modern nation-states, and will examine ways in which people's identities as members of nation-states are formed in various ways by institutions and social processes, and how ideas such as ethnicity, race and culture are tied in complex ways to national identities.

Mathematics

Department Website:

https://www.juniata.edu/academics/departments/mathematics/

Faculty:

Background Information:

Mathematics is arguably the most fundamental of all academic disciplines.  Often called the universal language, mathematics underlies a great part of the physical sciences and also has important connections to computer science, philosophy, economics and business, music, and many other fields.  At the same time, mathematics can be regarded as high art, well worth studying for its stark beauty alone.  Contrary to beliefs that it is a static discipline, mathematics is currently in a period of explosive growth in its internal development and its applications, and in the use of technology to enhance and extend our understanding.  At Juniata, we strive to equip our students to appreciate and participate in this exciting evolution.  To this end, we are fortunate to enjoy close ties with the departments of Information Technology and Computer Science, Physics, and Accounting, Business, and Economics. Just as important, we have a close working relationship with the Education Department to support a strong preparation for teaching mathematics at the secondary level.

The mathematics department also offers courses in statistics. Statistics is the science of collecting, organizing, analyzing and presenting data. Math faculty teach courses in statistics within the department and as part of the Data Science Program.

Special programs, facilities, or equipment:

Programs of Emphasis:

Individualized Programs of Emphasis:

Secondary Emphasis:

Internship/Research Experiences:

Study Abroad Opportunities:

Specific department policy:

Awarding credit for AP Exam scores:

Courses:

Many of the mathematics courses use mathematical software to facilitate computation and aid mathematical reasoning.

MA-100   Precalculus (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N,QM) This course is designed for students who need a structured review of precalculus mathematics. Topics covered include solving equations and inequalities, graphing, and analysis of functions, including polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions and trigonometric functions. Integrates the use of the software package Maple in classroom demonstrations and homework assignments. This course cannot be included in a mathematics POE. Prerequisites: High school algebra and trigonometry.

MA-103   Quantitative Methods (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; Q) This course prepares students to be quantitatively literate citizens in today's world. By learning to think critically about quantitative issues, students will be able to make responsible decisions in their daily lives. Problems are analyzed and solved using numerical, graphical, statistical, and algebraic reasoning. Technology is used to help visualize data and facilitate calculations, as well as to present quantitative output and verbal arguments.

MA-109   Mathematical Problem Solving (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; QM,WK-FR) In this course, students use unsophisticated math to find solutions to problems. Many of the math concepts will be familiar but there are some that will be new. The focus will be on using math creatively to answer questions of interest. Unlike standard math exercises that ask students to apply techniques to come up with a numerical answer or an expression, the questions require students to use the mathematics they know to come up with a strategy to accomplish a task or make meaningful decisions. Prereq or Coreq: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

MA-116   Discrete Structures (Fall; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N,Q) Introduces mathematical structures and concepts such as functions, relations, logic, induction, counting, and graph theory. Their application to Computer Science is emphasized. Pre-requisite high school algebra.

MA-130   Calculus I (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N,QM) An introduction to calculus including differentiation and integration of elementary functions of a single variable, limits, tangents, rates of change, maxima and minima, area, volume, and other applications. Integrates the use of computer algebra systems, and graphical, algebraic and numerical thinking.

MA-138   Mathematics and Democracy (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N,QM,WK-FR) Introduction to topics in mathematics related to democracy including voting theory, gerrymandering, and apportionment. We will discuss the comparison between these topics mathematically versus politically. Prerequsite or Corequisite: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

MA-155   The Heart of Mathematics (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N,WK-FR) The goal of this course is to give a broad range of students the hands-on experience of doing mathematics. Topics may include infinity, higher dimensions, chaos, and graph theory. The emphasis will be on the process of doing mathematics: generating examples, looking for patterns, making conjectures, and proving these conjectures. Prerequisites: FYC 101.

MA-160   Linear Algebra (Fall & Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; N,QM) An introduction to systems of linear equations, matrices, determinants, vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues, and applications.Prerequisites: MA130.

MA-199   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) An introduction to one of the branches of mathematics not currently included in the regular course offerings.

MA-205   Elementary Statistics (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N,QS,WK-SP) Introduction to traditional statistical concepts including descriptive statistics, binomial and normal probability models, confidence intervals, tests of hypotheses, linear correlation and regression, two-way contingency tables, and one-way analysis of variance. Pre-Req or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

MA-208   Symbolic Logic (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N,H,WK-FR) An introduction to the basics of first-order logic: the concept of artificial language, techniques for symbolizing ordinary languages and arguments, formal inference systems (either truth- free method or natural deduction), and other advanced topics in first-order logic. It has no prerequisites beyond high school algebra.

MA-210   Foundations of Mathematics (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; CW) An introduction to the logical and set-theoretic basis of modern mathematics. Topics covered include propositional and predicate logic; induction; naive and axiomatic set theory, binary relations, mappings, infinite sets and cardinality; finite sets and combinatorics; and an introduction to the theory of computability. Students will learn to read and to express mathematical ideas in the set-theoretic idiom. Prerequisites: MA160 or MA116 or PL208 or MA208 or permission of the instructor.

MA-220   Introduction to Probability & Statistics (Fall & Spring; Variable; 4.00 Credits; N,QS,CTGES) An introduction to the basic ideas and techniques of probability theory and to selected topics in statistics, such as sampling theory, confidence intervals, and linear regression. Prerequisite: MA130.

MA-230   Calculus II (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N,QM) Expands the treatment of two-space using polar and parametric equations. Emphasizes multivariable calculus, including vectors in three dimensions, curves and surfaces in space, functions of several variables, partial differentiation, multiple integration, and applications. Prerequisite: MA130.

MA-233   Integrals Series & Differential Equations (Fall; Yearly; 2.00 Credits; N) Integration, Taylor and Fourier series, and an introduction to differential equations, with applications and the use of the software package Maple. (Course meets four times per week and concludes at midterm.) Note: A student may receive credit for MA233 or MA235, but not for both. Prerequisite: MA130.

MA-235   Calculus III (Fall; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N,QM) A continuation of the calculus sequence. Topics include methods of integration by Simpson's Rule, applications, Taylor and Fourier series; introduction to ordinary differential equations; integration in polar, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates; differential and integral vector calculus. Prerequisites: MA230.

MA-299   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) An introduction to one of the branches of mathematics not currently in the regular course offerings. Prerequisites: Vary depending on course offering.

MA-303   Mathematical Modeling (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N,QM,CW) How to use mathematics to model " real-world " problems. Modeling topics range from population dynamics to economics to the nuclear arms race. Mathematical tools range from calculus to curve fitting to computer simulation. How to make a little bit of mathematics go a long way. Note: MA160 is recommended. Prerequisite: MA130 and experience with programming and Minitab.

MA-316   Combinatorics (Fall; Even Years; 3.00 Credits; QM,N) Advanced counting: what they didn't teach you on Sesame Street. An introduction to graphs, trees, and enumeration techniques with applications to computer science and biology. Prerequisites: MA116 or MA210 or MA220 or permission of the instructor.

MA-321   Multivariate Statistics (Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; N,QS) A class in multivariate statistical techniques including non-parametric methods, multiple regression, logistic regression, multiple testing, principle analysis. Prerequisites: An introductory statistics course ( MA220 or BI305 or PY214 or EB211) and linear algebra (MA 160) or Calculus 1 (MA 130).

MA-322   Probability (Spring; Even Years; 3.00 Credits; N,QM) Topics in probability including discrete and continuous random variables, expectations, mean, variance, moment generating functions, multivariate distributions, correlation, and independence, all leading to an efficient study of the binomial, Poisson, gamma, chi-square, and normal distributions. Prerequisites: MA220 and MA230; MA235 is recommended.

MA-325   Statistical Consulting (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N,QS,CW,SW-LE) The participating students will receive training during the semester in consulting on statistical problems and to assist in collaborative efforts with faculty and/or staff on client-partnered projects that are pre-determined. The semester-long project provides the student with both real work experience in the field of statistics and a project-based learning experience in partnership with the client. May be taken multiple times for credit. Pre-Reqs: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109; any one course from the following list: BI-305, EB-211, ESS-230, ESS-309, MA-205, MA-220, PY-361, or SW-215.

MA-335   Differential Equations (Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N,QM) Theory and application of ordinary differential equations. Emphasis on modern qualitative techniques, with numerical and analytical approaches used when appropriate. Contains a brief introduction to partial differential equations. Prerequisites: MA130 and MA230 and MA235 or MA233.

MA-341   Scientific Computing (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) This course begins with an introduction to fundamental concepts in Scientific Computing and concludes with domain-specific projects in areas like Bioinformatics, Data Science, Physical Systems, and Numerical Analysis. The common content will include command-line interfaces (Linux), programming languages (Jupyter/Python), numerical and graphical libraries (NumPy and Matplotlib), version-control (Git/Github), and relational databases (SQL). Pre-Req: CS-110.

MA-350   Topics in Geometry (Spring; Odd Years; 3.00 Credits; N) Examines the history and development of geometry with an axiomatic development of Euclidean geometry leading to an investigation of hyperbolic and elliptical non-Euclidean geometries. The roles of these discoveries in the history of mathematics are emphasized. Prerequisites: MA210 or PL208 or MA208.

MA-355   Nature of Mathematics (Spring; Odd Years; 1.00 Credit) An introduction to the history and philosophy of mathematics. Briefly traces the historical development of mathematics from its Oriental and Greek origins to modern times. Surveys the different philosophies of mathematics and provides some insight into the current crisis in the foundations of mathematics. Corequisite: MA350. Prerequisite: MA210 or PL208 or MA208.

MA-360   Abstract Algebra (Spring; Even Years; 3.00 Credits) Investigates the algebraic properties of the real numbers and their generalizations. Emphasis on group theory, with introductions to integral domains, rings, fields and vector spaces. Prerequisites: MA160 and MA210.

MA-365   Number Theory (Fall; Odd Years; 3.00 Credits; N) An investigation of topics in Elementary Number Theory including divisibility, primes, congruence, congruence equations, quadratic residues and quadratic reciprocity, arithmetic and multiplicative functions, Diophantine equations, and other topics selected according to interest. Prerequisites: MA210 or permission of the instructor.

MA-370   Real Analysis (Spring; Odd Years; 3.00 Credits; N) Focuses on functions of a real variable, sequences, limits, continuity, differentiation and the derivation of standard theorems of the differential calculus. Prerequisites: MA210 and MA230 and MA235.

MA-375   Complex Analysis (Fall; Even Years; 3.00 Credits; N) Algebra and geometry of the complex numbers, analytic functions, complex integration, Taylor and Laurent series, residue theory, physical applications, and other topics as time allows. Prerequisites: MA235.

MA-399   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) An introduction to one of the branches of mathematics not currently included in the regular course offerings, such as number theory, history of mathematics, chaos and fractals, topology, graph theory, mathematical logic. Prerequisites: Vary depending on course offering. Note: abbreviated ST: Students may take each ST: course for credit.

MA-480   Mathematics Seminar I (Fall; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; N) A discussion-based study of current mathematical literature and modeling problems. Students will both apply their previous mathematical knowledge and explore new topics. In addition, students may use this course as preparation for an individual research project to be completed in MA485. A junior taking this course may repeat it as a senior as MA481. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing, MA160, MA210 and MA235 or permission of the instructor.

MA-481   Mathematics Seminar II (Fall; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; N) See MA480. Prerequisite: MA480.

MA-485   Mathematics Research (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00-5.00 Credits; N) Allows students to pursue a program of directed original research in pure or applied mathematics. Required of candidates for distinction in mathematics POE. Prerequisites: MA480.

MA-490   Mathematics Internship/Needs Paperwork (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 2.00-9.00 Credits; N) Placement with an organization applying mathematical techniques such as statistical analysis, operations research, actuarial mathematics, or systems analysis. Designed to afford the student an opportunity to apply analytical and technical skills developed in the POE. Prerequisites: POE in Mathematics, permission and Jr. or Sr. Standing. Corequisite: MA495.

MA-495   Internship Research/Seminar (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 2.00-6.00 Credits; N) Requires students to reflect on the internship experience and/or pursue research related to the placement. Corequisite: MA490. Prerequisite: permission.

MA-TUT   Mathematics Teaching Assistant (Variable; Variable; 1.00-3.00 Credits; N)

Music

Department Website:

https://www.juniata.edu/academics/departments/music/

Faculty:

Background Information:

The Department of Music provides opportunities for students to further one’s performance skills, from beginners through advanced levels, and improve their understanding of music as a form of creative expression. Departmental courses and ensembles offer students the chance to perceive the subtleties of musical expression, to approach music as a reflection of the cultures in which it is found, to perform of some of the greatest literature in our art form, and to develop new, lifelong friendships. The department is very popular, serving over 350 musicians each semester. Juniata does not offer a POE or secondary emphasis in Music. Our emphasis is non-vocational high-quality musical experiences and training.

Ensembles:

Programs of Emphasis:

Recommended sequencing of courses:

Private studio lessons help improve musicians' sound quality, intellectual understanding, technique, expression and creativity. Enrollment for 1 credit provides 14weekly 30 minute private lessons; two credits provide 14weekly 60 minute private lessons. No previous experience necessary. Private lessons carry additional fees. Studio music fees are not refunded after drop/add. Instructor will contact you. If you haven't heard from them by the 4th day of classes, you may email them.

In one’s first semester of studio enrollment, enroll in:

MU-111A   Woodwind Studio (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00-2.00 Credits; F) (section 1: saxophone; section 2: clarinet; section 3: bassoon; section 4: oboe. For flute studio, see MU 111H below.

MU-111B   Violin/Viola Studio (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00-2.00 Credits; F) Violins and violas may be available for rental.

MU-111C   Brass Studio (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00-2.00 Credits; F) Students usually provide their own instruments, although some instruments may be available for sign-out.

MU-111D   Percussion Studio (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00-2.00 Credits; F) All instruments are supplied by the College, but purchase of music, sticks, or mallets may be required.

MU-111E   Piano Studio (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00-2.00 Credits; F) Pianos are available for practice in the music building.

MU-111F   Voice Studio (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00-2.00 Credits; F)

MU-111G   Guitar Studio (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00-2.00 Credits; F) Students supply their own instruments.

MU-111H   Flute Studio (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00-2.00 Credits; F) Students supply their own instruments.

MU-111I   Cello Studio (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00-2.00 Credits; F) Students typically supply their own instruments although instruments may be available for sign-out on a limited basis.

MU-111K   Studio Jazz Improvisation Lessons (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00-2.00 Credits; F) Private improvisation instruction, primarily in jazz styles. Individualized curriculum, based on needs and abilities of each student, will include scales, chords, and real-time usage of those elements in improvising. Also, basic instruction in one or more of these areas may be added by instructor if deemed necessary and only as directly related to student's development as an improviser: biographies and styles of famed improvisers, ear training, transcribing, and jazz styles/history. Students provide their own instruments. MU-111L   Bass Studio (Fall & Spring; All Years; 1.00-2.00 Credits; F)

MU-111M   Composition/Song Writing (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00-2.00 Credits; F) This course is one-on-one studio instruction in the craft of composition and/or songwriting. Instruction focuses on traditional classical/concert music, but can also include other genres as needed including, pop, folk, rock, and jazz. Topics include notation, orchestration, idiomatic writing for instruments and voices, musical form, and score study. Short term assignments are given throughout the semester, culminating in a more substantial work.

In one’s second semester of studio enrollment, enroll in the appropriate section of MU 112.

In one’s third semester of studio enrollment, enroll in the appropriate section of MU 211.

In one’s fourth semester of studio enrollment, enroll in the appropriate section of MU 212.

In one’s fifth semester of studio enrollment, enroll in the appropriate section of MU 311.

In one’s sixth semester of studio enrollment, enroll in the appropriate section of MU 312.

In one’s seventh semester of studio enrollment, enroll in the appropriate section of MU 411.

In one’s eighth semester of studio enrollment, enroll in the appropriate section of MU 412.

Members of Juniata major instrumental ensembles may co-enroll in half-price lessons, as follows: (Corequisites: One of MU115-MU122 or one of MU133-MU140 or one of MU141-MU148 or one of MU191-MU198, and instructor's permission.)

Private Studio:

Private studio lessons help improve musicians' sound quality, intellectual understanding, technique, expression and creativity. Enrollment for 1 credit provides 14 weekly 30 minute private lessons; two credits provide 14 weekly 60 minute private lessons. No previous experience necessary. Private lessons carry additional fees. Studio music fees are not refunded after drop/add. Instructor will contact you. If you haven't heard from them by the 4th day of classes, you may email them.

Members of Juniata major instrumental ensembles may co-enroll in half-price lessons, as follows: (Corequisites: One of MU115-MU122 or one of MU133-MU140 or one of MU141-MU148 or one of MU191-MU198, and instructor's permission.)

One credit. 30 minute private lesson every other week (or, 2 students per lesson weekly). MU189 enables students in one of our 4 major instrumental ensembles to also enroll in lessons with the appropriate studio instructor. Lessons are not a requirement for membership in an ensemble.

These lessons do not fulfill FISHN requirements; for FISHN-eligible lessons enroll in MU111 et al. instead. If ensemble course is dropped this course must be dropped too.

MU-189A   Instrumental Lessons Woodwinds (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit) (section 1: saxophone; section 2: clarinet; section 3: bassoon; section 4: oboe. For flute studio, see MU 189H below.

MU-189B   Instrumental Lesson Violin/Viola (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit)

MU-189C   Instrumental Lessons Brass (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit)

MU-189D   Instrumental Lessons Percussion (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit)

MU-189E   Instrumental Lessons Piano (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit)

MU-189G   Instrumental Lessons Guitar (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit)

MU-189H   Instrumental Lessons Flute (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit)

MU-189I   Instrumental Lessons Cello (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit)

MU-189K   Instrumental Lessons Studio Jazz (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit)

MU-189L   Instrumental Lessons Bass (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; F)


Courses:

MU-111A   Woodwind Studio (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00-2.00 Credits; F) Private studio lessons help improve musicians' sound quality, intellectual understanding, technique, expression and creativity. Enrollment for 1 credit provides a weekly 30 minute private lesson; two credits provide a weekly 60 minute private lesson. No previous experience necessary. Private lessons carry additional fees. Studio music fees are not refunded after drop/add. Instructor will contact you. If you haven't heard from them by the 4th day of classes, you may email them.

MU-111B   Violin/Viola Studio (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00-2.00 Credits; F) Private studio lessons help improve musicians' sound quality, intellectual understanding, technique, expression and creativity. Enrollment for one credit provides a weekly 30 minute private lesson; two credits provide a weekly 60 minute private lesson. Students typically supply their own instruments. Violins and violas may be available for rental. No previous experience necessary. Private lessons carry additional fees. Studio music fees are not refunded after drop/add. Instructor will contact you. If you haven't heard from them by the 4th day of classes, you may email them.

MU-111C   Brass Studio (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00-2.00 Credits; F) Private studio lessons help improve musicians' sound quality, intellectual understanding, technique, expression and creativity. Enrollment for one credit provides a weekly 30 minute private lesson; two credits provide a weekly 60 minute private lesson. Students usually provide their own instruments, although some instruments may be available for sign-out. No previous experience necessary. Private lessons carry additional fees. Studio music fees are not refunded after drop/add. Instructor will contact you. If you haven't heard from them by the 4th day of classes, you may email them.

MU-111D   Percussion Studio (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00-2.00 Credits; F) Private studio lessons help improve musicians' sound quality, intellectual understanding, technique, expression and creativity. Enrollment for one credit provides a weekly 30 minute private lesson; two credits provide a weekly 60 minute private lesson. No previous experience necessary. All instruments are supplied by the College, but purchase of music, sticks, or mallets may be required. Private lessons carry additional fees. Studio music fees are not refunded after drop/add. Instructor will contact you. If you haven't heard from them by the 4th day of classes, you may email them.

MU-111E   Piano Studio (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00-2.00 Credits; F) Private studio lessons help improve musicians' sound quality, intellectual understanding, technique, expression and creativity. Enrollment for one credit provides a weekly 30 minute private lesson; two credits provide a weekly 60 minute private lesson. Pianos are available for practice in the music building. No previous experience necessary. Private lessons carry additional fees. Studio music fees are not refunded after drop/add. Instructor will contact you. If you haven't heard from them by the 4th day of classes, you may email them. You must complete all semesters in order. (ex: MU111E, MU112E, MU211E, MU212E, etc.)

MU-111F   Voice Studio (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00-3.00 Credits; F) Private studio lessons help improve musicians' sound quality, intellectual understanding, technique, expression and creativity. Enrollment for one credit provides a weekly 30 minute private lesson; two credits provide a weekly 60 minute private lesson. No previous experience necessary. Private lessons carry additional fees. Studio music fees are not refunded after drop/add. Instructor will contact you. If you haven't heard from them by the 4th day of classes, you may email them.

MU-111G   Guitar Studio (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00-2.00 Credits; F) Private studio lessons help improve musicians' sound quality, intellectual understanding, technique, expression and creativity. Enrollment for one credit provides a weekly 30 minute private lesson; two credits provide a weekly 60 minute private lesson. Students supply their own instruments. No previous experience necessary. Private lessons carry additional fees. Studio music fees are not refunded after drop/add. Instructor will contact you. If you haven't heard from them by the 4th day of classes, you may email them.

MU-111H   Flute Studio (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00-2.00 Credits; F) Private studio lessons help improve musicians' sound quality, intellectual understanding, technique, expression and creativity. Enrollment for one credit provides a weekly 30 minute private lesson; two credits provide a weekly 60 minute private lesson. Students supply their own instruments. No previous experience necessary. Private lessons carry additional fees. Studio music fees are not refunded after drop/add. Instructor will contact you. If you haven't heard from them by the 4th day of classes, you may email them.

MU-111I   Cello Studio (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00-2.00 Credits; F) Private studio lessons help improve musicians' sound quality, intellectual understanding, technique , expression and creativity. Enrollment for one credit provides a weekly 30 minute private lesson; two credits provide a weekly 60 minute private lesson. Students typically supply their own instruments although instruments may be available for sign-out on a limited basis. No previous experience necessary. Private lessons carry additional fees. Studio music fees are not refunded after drop/add. Instructor will contact you. If you haven't heard from them by the 4th day of classes, you may email them.

MU-111K   Studio Jazz Improvisation Lessons (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00-2.00 Credits; F) Private improvisation instruction, primarily in jazz styles. Individualized curriculum, based on needs and abilities of each student, will include scales, chords, and real-time usage of those elements in improvising. Also, basic instruction in one or more of these areas may be added by instructor if deemed necessary and only as directly related to student's development as an improviser: biographies and styles of famed improvisers, ear training, transcribing, and jazz styles/history. Studio music fees are not refunded after drop/add. Enrollment for one credit provides a weekly 30 minute private lesson; two credits provide a weekly 60 minute private lesson. Students provide their own instruments. No previous experience necessary. Private lessons carry additional fees. Instructor will contact you. If you haven't heard from them by the 4th day of classes, you may email them.

MU-111L   Bass Studio (Fall & Spring; All Years; 1.00-2.00 Credits; F) Private studio lessons help improve musicians' sound quality, intellectual understanding, technique, expression and creativity. Enrollment for 1 credit provides a weekly 30 minute private lesson; two credits provide a weekly 60 minute private lesson. No previous experience necessary. Students must supply their own instrument. Private lessons carry additional fees. Studio music fees are not refunded after drop/add. Instructor will contact you. If you haven't heard from them by the 4th day of classes, you may email them.

MU-111M   Composition/Song Writing (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00-2.00 Credits; F,CTDH) This course is one-on-one studio instruction in the craft of composition and/or songwriting. Instruction focuses on traditional classical/concert music, but also includes other genres as needed including, pop, folk, rock, and jazz. Topics include notation, orchestration, idiomatic writing for instruments and voices, musical form, and score study. Short term assignments are given throughout the semester, culminating in a more substantial work.

MU-113   Guitar Class I (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; F) The fundamentals of guitar playing are taught in small groups one hour per week. Beginning through intermediate classes emphasize songs, movable chords, blues and standardized forms in the plectrum and finger picking styles. Students must supply their own instruments.

MU-114   Guitar Class II (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; F) (see MU113).

MU-115   Practicum: JC Percussion (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; F) Students study and perform a wide variety of ensemble music on percussion instruments, in various percussion-only pieces as well as wind band, orchestral, and/or jazz ensemble settings. Music assignments are based on student interest and ability, and are individually assigned to further develop ensemble playing abilities and musicianship. Rehearsals and concert emphasize the communicative aspects of music, culturally correct practices and techniques in percussion, and the development of the tools that are necessary to produce a high quality ensemble experience. Individual practice outside of full rehearsals is expected. NOTE: Percussion ensemble students enroll in MU115 their first semester of membership, then MU116, then MU117, etc.

MU-131   Voice Class I (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 2.00 Credits; F) For students with no previous formal training in voice. Two fifty minute class sessions per week plus individual work with instructor as needed.

MU-132   Voice Class II (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 2.00 Credits; F) (see MU131).

MU-133   JC Concert Band (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; F) One of two wind bands at Juniata. This ensemble performs a variety of level III-IV concert band literature as well as occasional woodwinds-only and brasses-only pieces, to develop ensemble playing abilities, explore significant and newer quality wind literature, improve members' musicianship, and experience the communicative aspects of music.

MU-141   Orchestra (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; F) Orchestra performs a wide variety of music for both string ensembles and full orchestra chosen to develop musicianship and ensemble. Rehearsals and concerts emphasize the development of musical skills necessary to create a high quality performance experience for both players and audience. Requirements include attendance at a weekly sectional rehearsal and the full ensemble rehearsal in addition to individual preparation. Field trips to hear excellent performances by professional string artists may be offered. Note: Students enroll in MU141 their first semester, MU142 their second, etc.

MU-153   Guitar Class III (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; F) (see MU113).

MU-154   Guitar Class IV (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; F) (see MU113).

MU-163   Jazz Ensemble (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; F) Performs a wide variety of Jazz ensemble music chosen to develop ensemble playing abilities and musicianship. Rehearsal and concert emphasize the communicative aspects of music and the development of the tools that are necessary to produce a high quality ensemble experience. Practice outside of full rehearsals is required. NOTE: Jazz ensemble students enroll in MU163 their first semester of membership, then MU164, then MU165, etc. Winds must also be enrolled in MU 133-140 or MU 191-198.

MU-171   Choral Union (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; F) Performs larger choral works to develop vocal ability, sight reading, diction skills, and musicianship. One major on-campus performance per semester.

MU-181   Juniata Concert Choir (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; F) Performs a variety of choral music chosen to develop vocal ability, sight-reading, multi-lingual diction skills, and musicianship. Performances and projects include on-campus programs, spring tour(s), recording, and weekend tour. Members selected through audition.

MU-189   Instructional Lesson (Ensemble Members) (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit) MU-189 enables students in one of our three major instrumental ensembles to also enroll in lessons with the appropriate studio instructor. 30-minute private lesson every other week or two students per lesson weekly. Corequisite: Enrollment in Wind Symphony, Percussion Ensemble, or Orchestra. Lessons are not a requirement for membership in an ensemble, but you must be in an ensemble to register for MU-189. If the ensemble course is dropped, this course must be dropped, too.

MU-191   J.C. Wind Symphony (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; F) Our wind symphony is the premier instrumental ensemble for winds at Juniata. The ensemble performs a variety of wind band literature chosen to develop ensemble-playing abilities and musicianship, as well as occasional chamber pieces for sections or heterogeneous groups. Rehearsals and concerts emphasize the communicative aspects of music and the development of the tools that are necessary to produce a high-quality ensemble experience. NOTE: Wind symphony members enroll in MU191 their first semester of membership, then MU192, MU193 etc.

MU-199   MU Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00 Credit) Allows departments to offer topics not normally taught. Prerequisites, corequisites, and fees vary by title.

MU-210   Musical Improvisation (Variable; Variable; 1.00 Credit; F) This course will present the basics of musical improvisation technique. Basic jazz music theory (scales, chords) and brief historical coverage of famed improvisers (Ella, Bird, Trane, Miles, et al.) will also be included. Extensive in-class student demonstrations of improvisation skills will be expected. Practice/goal oriented jam session time outside of class is expected, 5 hours per week is recommended.

MU-241   A Cappella Ensembles (Variable; Yearly; 2.00 Credits; F) Students hone their musicianship through a variety of a cappella ensemble works specifically designed to build one-on-a-part skills. Multiple ensemble combination opportunities are created within the class. Emphasis is placed on individual preparation. Prerequisites: MU171 or MU181 or MU281.

MU-299   MU Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00 Credit) Allows departments to offer topics not normally taught. Prerequisites, corequisites, and fees vary by title.

MS-101   Music Fundamentals (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; F,WK-CE) The course is designed to teach students the basic tools and elements of music and its notation. Students learn to become literate in the fundamentals of music (reading and writing music notes, intervals, scales, chords, rhythms, structure) and apply that knowledge to composition (e.g. a group project composing a brief percussion ensemble piece) and basic piano proficiency. The course includes discussions of the importance of music in society and in education. Listening skills are developed over the course of the semester. Pre- or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

MS-110   Survey of Western Music (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; F) Uses the historical development of " Western " music literature as the basis for forming a better understanding of the art of music. Listening skills are developed over the course of the semester.

MS-116   World Musics and Cultures (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; F,I,SW-GE) World Musics and Cultures is a survey class intended to educate students about a variety of different cultures and how music functions in human society. Cultures covered will include South Asia (India and Pakistan), East Asia (China, Japan, and Korea), the Caribbean (Jamaica, Trinidad, and Cuba), and Sub-Saharan Africa, along with other possibilities.

MS-120   Architectural & Musical Forms (Either Semester; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; WK-FR) This course explores concepts of form -- the use and organization of aesthetic space -- through studies of how " building and bridge architects " and " musical architects " (composers and producers) structure artforms. Artifacts include everything from Ellis Hall and Brumbaugh Academic Center to large-scale bridges and the works of Frank Gehry, and from simple A-B-A forms to advanced classical and " art rock " musical forms.

MS-130   History of American Popular Musics (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; F,WK-CE) This course explores popular musics throughout American history, from Revolutionary War era through 20th century. Units on mainstream pop/rock, jazz and its ancestors, early town bands, musical theatre, country, fragmentation of the market in the 1960's, and other topics are included. Students complete various presentations and readings on topics affecting the development of mainstream pop music. Pre- oe Coreq: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

MS-199   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows the departments to offer special topics not normally offered. Departments may offer more than one special topic. Prerequisites vary by title.

MS-200   Music Literacy (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; WK-CE) Music Literacy provides student musicians an opportunity to complete the Ways of Knowing Creative Expression requirement by learning to speak and write knowledgeably about an instrument, the music they are performing, and music's cultural context, as well as music history and theory. Develops active listening skills. To enroll in this course and to earn the Creative Expression requirement, students must have taken prior to and/or concurrently with this course, 3 credits of MU courses, taken in the same instrument.

MS-299   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows the departments to offer special topics not normally offered. Departments may offer more than one special topic. Prerequisites vary by title.

MS-399   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Provides supplements to the regular departmental program, exploring topics and areas not regularly scheduled. Note: abbreviated ST: (title). Students may take each ST course for credit.

Non-Departmental

Faculty:

While many interdisciplinary courses are found among the College’s department offerings, some are taught outside that structure. They may be used in constructing a Program of Emphasis. 

Courses:

ND-102   Introduction to Library Research (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; H) This one hour, one semester course is designed to teach students the fundamentals of library research, from the basic organization of materials through the analytical process of determining useful and appropriate research materials. This course will be taught every semester by the library staff, and there is no pre- requisite.

ND-110   Career Planning (Variable; Variable; 1.00 Credit; S) Examines theories of occupational choice and career development and provides the learner with the opportunity to become more aware of their interests, values, and capacities as they relate to the career decision-making process.

ND-198   Solving the Covid-19 Crisis (Variable; Variable; 1.00 Credit) Learn how Juniata students and faculty are using the COVID-19 crisis to make a difference in the world, and explore ways that you can make a difference, too. This one-credit course describes how different disciplinary lenses help us understand and address the challenges presented by the coronavirus pandemic. NOTE: Registration in this course is restricted to only incoming new students.

ND-199   ND Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows departments to offer courses not normally taught. Prerequisites and fees vary by course titles.

ND-203C   Cultural Learning Tour (Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit) Students enrolled in this course will participate in a service-learning trip to explore social, cultural, political and/or environmental issues through various service and educational experiences. Involvement in trip activities will help students develop a foundation of knowledge about the importance of civic and community engagement. Biweekly meetings in spring semester will facilitate development of learning objectives and provide background information related to the region in which the group will serve. The service experience will be complemented by discussion and reflection before, during, and after the trip. Applications are accepted in fall. Associated fees vary by trip. Note: This course requires 25 hours of out of class time per semester.

ND-206   Remote Field Course Seminar (Spring; Yearly; 2.00 Credits; IC,CW,SW-US) Join us in learning about the U.S. Southwest (New Mexico, Arizona, Utah, and Colorado) and plan on visiting the sites discussed in class and examining the impact on the indigenous people. The course uses an interdisciplinary approach, pulling from the expertise of physics, biology, psychology, and education. The RFC seminar course (ND-206) is scheduled during the spring semester and is paired with ND-207 during the summer term, during which students and instructors travel to the various locations studied during the seminar. Students must take both courses to fulfill the IC or the U.S. Experience general education requirement. The total fee for the experience is split between the two courses, with half on the spring semester billing and the other half on the summer term billing. Pre- or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

ND-207   Remote Field Course (Summer; Yearly; 2.00 Credits; IC,CW,SW-US) This course builds on the introduction to the Southwest the students began in ND-206, by taking them to the field to explore the biology, geology, anthropology, and history of the Southwest desert region from a variety of perspectives. Students explore how humans have historically interacted in this arid environment and how modern culture has placed environmental burdens on the region's resources. This course is a field trip to Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah. Half of the total fee is charged with ND-206 in the spring and the other half with ND-207 in the summer. Students must take both courses to fulfill the IC or the U.S. Experience general education requirement. Prerequisite: ND-206 or IC-206.

ND-271   3D Design, Scanning & Printing (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; CTDH,WK-CE) The course introduces non-specialist students to the current techniques of 3D design, scanning, and printing. It harnesses technology to creative art opportunities and artistic appreciation to technological processes. No pre-existing skill sets are assumed so the course is suitable to beginners and novices. Pre-requisite: FYC-101

ND-292   Fulbright Special Topics Course (Variable; Variable; 1.00-3.00 Credits; I,SW-GE) This course will focus on a people and culture outside of the U.S. or on a global challenge. The course will often relate to Mexico or to U.S.-Mexico relations. The specific topic of this course will be determined based on the interests of the Mexico Studies Chair and the needs of the College.

ND-298   Transitions (Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit) Faculty, staff, alumni, and guests will provide expertise and advice designed to help students understand and prepare for successful transitions. The process of transition (loss of what is familiar and known) will be discussed utilizing models of behavior within social systems and personal experiences. Case studies will examine: changing career goals; adjusting to cultural differences; the transition from life as an undergraduate to life as a graduate student; work life unreadiness; lifestyle adjustments such as financial independence, rural to urban, and changing relationships.

ND-299   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows department to offer courses not normally taught. Prerequisites vary by title.

ND-308   Science Outreach Leadership (Variable; Variable; 1.00-3.00 Credits) Offers the opportunity for active participation in the planning, design, and implementation of the PA Junior Science & Humanities Symposium and the PA Special Olympics events that are hosted at Juniata College.

ND-311   Digital Ethics (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; SW-ER,CTDH) The digital revolution has forced upon humanity a new set of ethical challenges. Many of these challenges continue to confound us. In a seminar setting, students investigate the most pressing questions of digital life and formulate their own views and moral stances. Pre- or co-req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

ND-399   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 2.00-9.00 Credits) Allows the departments to offer special topics not normally offered. Departments may offer more than one special topic. Prerequisites vary by title.

ND-490   ND Intern/Needs Paperwork (Spring; Yearly; 2.00-9.00 Credits) See the chapter, " Special Programs " under " Internships " in the catalog. Corequisite: ND495. Prerequisite: Permission and Jr. or Sr. Standing.

ND-495   Internship Seminar (Variable; Variable; 2.00-6.00 Credits) Required of all students doing an internship. Emphasis is on readings and discussions of materials relevant to the internship experience. Corequisite: ND490.

ND-499   ND Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows department to offer topics not normally taught.

ND-TUT   ND Teaching Assistant (Variable; Variable; 1.00-3.00 Credits) See catalog.

Peace and Conflict Studies

Department Website:

https://www.juniata.edu/academics/departments/peace-and-conflict/

Faculty:

Background Information:

The Peace and Conflict Studies Program is directed and supported by The Baker Institute for Peace and Conflict Studies. The Program is an interdisciplinary inquiry into the human problems of war and deeply rooted conflict, and peace as a human potential. Courses in the PACS program systematically explore how and why humans resort to violence to resolve conflicts, and examines how peace and cooperation might be institutionalized through peacebuilding, conflict transformation and the study of human behavior and social institutions.

Special programs, facilities, or equipment:

Programs of Emphasis:

Examples of Individualized Programs of Emphasis:

Secondary Emphasis:

Internship/Research Experiences:

Courses:

PACS-105   Introduction to Conflict Resolution (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S,WK-SI) A survey of the field of conflict, this course explores the causes and consequences of social conflict. Theory and case studies are used to understand interpersonal disputes, the intricacies of groups in conflict and international issues and crisis. Emphasis is given to understanding the basic theoretical concepts of the field and developing basic conflict resolving skills. Pre- or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

PACS-108   Mediation (Either Semester; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S,SW-ER) This course is an introduction to the theory and skills that constitute the practice of interest-based mediation. Students will learn the fundamentals of mediation, become familiar with their own conflict resolution styles, and consider some cultural and ethical issues relevant to the practice of mediation. Weekly readings will provide a theoretical framework, but this course's emphasis will be on skill development. Through small-group role-play and simulation, students will work toward proficiency in the mediation process and provide constructive peer evaluations in a collaborative, spirited atmosphere. Pre- or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

PACS-110   Introduction to Peace & Conflict Studies (Either Semester; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; I,SW-GE) This course explores war and deep-rooted conflict as human problems and peace as a human potential. Students collaborate in small groups to explore a range of different approaches to peace around the world. Prerequisite or corequisite: FYC or CWS

PACS-199   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows the department to offer topics not normally taught. Prerequisites vary by title.

PACS-299   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) An examination of an area of study not regularly included in departmental offerings. Prerequisites vary with topics.

PACS-305   Gender and Conflict (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S,I,CW,SW-ER) This course looks at the intersection of gender and conflict to understand what it means to say that a conflict is gendered. It uses gender as an organizing concept to study issues of gender equality, justice, and peace, challenging and interrogating dichotomous, oppositional constructions of masculinity and femininity to understand how they contribute to direct, structural, and cultural violence. Pre- or Co-requisite: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

PACS-308   Nonviolence and Social Justice (Either Semester; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S,H,CW,SW-US) A study of the theory and practice of non-violence, this course explores both the theoretical development of nonviolence and the use of nonviolence as a means for waging and resolving conflict. The course explores nonviolence theory as it applies to issues of social change, alternative defense, and personal transformation, using writings from political, sociological, feminist, religious and philosophical perspectives. Prerequisite: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109. (Formerly titled Nonviolence: Theory and Practice)

PACS-310   Digital Peacebuilding (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) This course will examine how tech entrepreneurs, programmers, peacebuilders, NGOs, and civil society groups leverage smartphones, Information Communication Technologies (ICTs), crowd-mapping platforms, SMS-based mass texting tools, and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for coordinating natural disaster and humanitarian crisis responses, countering election violence, and raising public awareness against corruption and gender-based violence across the world.

PACS-391   Scholar in Residence Special Topic (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; WK-SI) This course will be offered by the PACS Scholar-in-Residence and section topics will vary depending upon the expertise of the visiting scholar. Topics will help students explore theories and frameworks for understanding negotiation within the field of peace and conflict studies as well as links to related fields such as psychology, communications, anthropology, international relations, and political science. Students will then apply their skills by conducting negotiations through simulation, role play, and practical exercises.

PACS-399   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows the department to offer special topics not normally offered. Departments may offer more than one special topic. Prerequisites vary by title.

PACS-455   PACS Honors Thesis I (Fall; Yearly; 3.00-6.00 Credits; H) Designed to serve as a course for students who emphasize PACS in their POE. The student will produce a major research paper that examines in depth a topic, theme, issue, or problem that has served as an area of special interest for the student throughout the previous two years of study. Prerequisite: Senior standing, PACS105 and PACS110 and a minimum of 4 200+ level PACS courses.

PACS-455B   PACS Honors Thesis II (Spring; Yearly; 3.00-6.00 Credits; S) Designed to serve as a capstone for students who emphasize PACS in their POE. The student will be expected to produce a major research paper that examines in depth a topic, theme, issue, or problem that has served as an area of special interest for the student throughout the previous two years of study. Prerequisite is Senior standing. PACS105 and PACS110 and a minimum of 4 200+ level PACS courses.

PACS-490   Peace & Conflict Studies Internship (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 2.00-9.00 Credits; I) An opportunity which requires students to relate theory and practice to a working environment and to reflect upon that experience. Corequisite: PACS 495. Prerequisite: Permission and Jr. or Sr. Standing.

PACS-495   PACS Intern.Res.Sem. (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 2.00-6.00 Credits; I) Requires students to reflect on the internship experience and/or pursue research related to the placement. Prerequisite: PACS110 and permission. Corequisite: PACS490.

PACS-499   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows the department to offer special topics not normally offered. Departments may offer more than one special topic. Prerequisites vary by title.

PACS-TUT   PACS Teaching Assistant (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits; S) See catalog

Philosophy

Department Website:

https://www.juniata.edu/academics/departments/philosophy/

Faculty:

Background Information:

 

As the oldest discipline and the womb of all knowledge, philosophy is the activity of critically and rationally examining the reasons behind the most fundamental presuppositions of human lives through thinking about thinking (Aristotle) and self-examination (Socrates).  The Department seeks to engage students in rational and critical thinking about their total life experience: logic, ethics, aesthetics, methods of knowing, and levels of being and, accordingly, to prepare students to lead examined lives.  Hence, in addition to fairly standard introductory and advanced courses, the department develops offerings of special interest to students in such diverse areas as natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities.  The study of philosophy develops students' abilities and skills of general problem solving, communication, persuasive powers, and writing.  Hence, much of what is learned in philosophy can be applied in virtually any intellectual endeavor (graduate studies and professional school) and any job.  More specially, philosophical training is indispensable for any serious thinkers in humanities and social sciences.

Special programs, facilities, or equipment:

Programs of Emphasis:

Individualized Programs of Emphasis in Philosophy and Another Area of Study:

For the students who want to take some substantial portion of philosophy courses either to enhance their existing POE in any area of study or just for their intellectual enjoyment, in addition to fairly standard introductory courses, the department develops offerings of special interest to students in such diverse areas as religious studies, politics, physics, biology, chemistry, psychology, environmental science and studies, economics and business, and peace and conflict studies.

Secondary Emphasis:

Courses:

PL-101   Introduction to Philosophy (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H,WK-HT) This course provides students with the background and conceptual tools that are required for more advanced study in the subject. At the discretion of the instructor, the course will either examine fundamental philosophical problems or provide a survey of important thinkers. Pre-Req or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109

PL-103   Life, Death, and Meaning (Fall & Spring; All Years; 3.00 Credits; H,WK-HT) The course will explore the meaning of life and death. Our primary concern will be with death, one's own inevitable personal death as it figures in human life and in contributing, or perhaps even detracting from, the meaningfulness of such a life. It will give you a deeper philosophical understanding of the meaning of death, and consequently the meaning of life, which will ultimately bring you into true being and authentic existence.

PL-105   Introduction to Logic (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H,WK-FR) An analysis of practical reasoning skills, including a systematic approach to informal arguments and the meaning of everyday claims. Aristotelian logic, Venn Diagrams, propositional logic and symbolic logic are included.

PL-106   Introduction to Ethics (Either Semester; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H,SW-ER) Examines the historically valid ethical approaches to problems, i.e., pragmatic, relativistic and absolute and the application of such methods to contemporary ethical dilemmas, e.g., abortion, terrorism, euthanasia, and capital punishment.

PL-199   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows the departments to offer special topics not normally offered. Departments may offer more than one special topic. Prerequisites vary by title.

PL-205   Ancient Philosophy (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H,CW,WK-HT) This course is a historical survey of ancient Greek philosophy which will cover representative figures (including the major pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle and important authors/movements from the Hellenistic period, such as Epicurus, Stoicism and Skepticism). Prerequisite or corequisite: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

PL-208   Symbolic Logic (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N,H,WK-FR) An introduction to the basics of first-order logic: the concept of artificial language, techniques for symbolizing ordinary languages and arguments, formal inference systems (either truth- free method or natural deduction), and other advanced topics in first-order logic. It has no prerequisites beyond high school algebra.

PL-230   Business Ethics (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; H,SW-ER) Asks the student to examine his/her personal values relative to those professional values of the business world. In particular, students will examine the claims of society, government, labor, management as they impact upon the individual who contemplates a career in the business world. Issues such as safety in the workplace, the right to privacy, and the obligations of the corporation to its employees, its customers, and to society itself will be covered. Pre-Req or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109

PL-235   Ethics of Health Care (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H,SW-ER) This course is a seminar-style course in 'professional ethics'. It will explore the various codes, value assumptions, and dilemmas faced by those who practice the health care professions. Specific topics (or dilemmas) will be determined by each class, based upon the specific POEs of the enrolled students. Pre-req or co-req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109

PL-250   Science and Human Values (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H,WK-HT,CTGES) This course examines the reciprocal influence between science and social values, from the perspective of the humanities. It asks, " What good is science? " Through selected readings and discussion, students consider how everyday life is shaped by scientific innovation and technology, just as society provides a framework of cultural values for science. Prereq or coreq: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109

PL-260   Philosophy of Science (Variable; Variable; 4.00 Credits; H,WK-HT,CTGES) Lays out some central philosophical problems raised by natural sciences. The possible topics to be discussed: Is science rational and objective? Does science really make progress? If so, in what sense? How to distinguish science from pseudoscience. Is science superior knowledge to other types? What is a good scientific explanation? Could we ever know about unobservable physical entities and events? Is it ever legitimate to regard a scientific theory as true? Prereq or coreq: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109

PL-265   Environmental Ethics (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H,SW-ER) As the life-support system for everyone, the environment is unquestionably of high value. Yet decisions about its care and its uses evoke controversy. This course explores contrasting viewpoints and practices that impact the earth and its plant and animal life. Through readings, projects, and critical discussion of cases, students apply ethical theories to selected contemporary issues. Prereq or coreq: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109

PL-270   Ethical Theory (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H,SW-ER) This course will provide students with an introduction to important debates in contemporary ethical theory (including debates about the epistemic status of moral claims and moral relativism). It will also introduce students to important normative frameworks within contemporary ethics (such as virtue ethics, utilitarianism, deontology, Confucian ethics, feminist ethics, etc.). Prerequisite: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109

PL-275   Modern Philosophy (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H,CA,CW,WK-HT) Selections from the founders of the twin pillars of modernity, i.e., Modern Philosophy (F. Bacon, Descartes, Leibniz, Spinoza, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant) and Modern Science (Copernicus, Spinoza, Galileo, Pascal, Newton, and Boyle) are studied with an emphasis on the philosophical origins of modern psychology and the epistemic foundations of contemporary scientific methodology. Prereq or coreq: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109

PL-299   Special Topics (Either Semester; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows the department to offer special topics not normally offered. Departments may offer more than one special topic. Prerequisites vary by title.

PL-304   Existentialism (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H,CW,WK-HT) This course provides students with an introduction to the major philosophers and themes associated with existentialist thought. Through a critical engagement with authors such as Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Sartre, and Camus (among others), we will explore questions concerning human freedom, alienation, authenticity, and mortality. Pre-or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

PL-308   End of History, Death of God (Either Semester; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H,CW,WK-HT) Formerly titled " Hegel to Nietzsche. " This course provides an introduction to important philosophical discussions in nineteenth-century philosophy and political thought centered around the Hegelian/Marxist themes of history's end and Nietzsche's attempt to grapple with the implications of what he called " the death of God. " Prerequisite or corequisite: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

PL-310   Contemporary Political Philosophy (Either Semester; Variable; 4.00 Credits; S,H,CW) This course will focus on important political orientations and figures in the twentieth/early twenty-first century. Instructors may also focus on specific topics which have driven recent debates in contemporary political philosophy, including distributive justice, the normative foundations of liberalism/democracy or the tension between state sovereignty and international law (among others). Prerequisites: Take 1 course from the PL department or permission of the instructor.

PL-318   Knowledge, Truth and Skepticism (Either Semester; Variable; 4.00 Credits; H) The course is a study of the nature of human knowledge and justification of beliefs with special attention to three conceptually related topics: the nature and value of knowledge and the nature and structure of epistemic justification, the nature of truth, and the challenges from skepticism and influential responses to it. Prerequisites: Take any 1 Philosophy course, or by instructor consent.

PL-399   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows the department to offer special topics not normally offered. Departments may offer more than one special topic. Prerequisites vary by title.

PL-450   Senior Thesis (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; H) Students will engage in independent research and write a substantial final paper which evidences sustained engagement with the secondary literature on a topic selected in consultation with faculty members. This course is designed as a capstone experience. Prereqisite: Senior standing.

PL-490   Internship/Need Paperwork (Variable; Variable; 2.00-9.00 Credits) See catalog.

PL-495   Internship Seminar (Variable; Variable; 2.00-6.00 Credits) See catalog

Philosophy, Politics, and Economics

Core Faculty

Associated Faculty:

Background Information:

A liberal arts education aims to provide students with the tools to understand the world as it has been and as it will be. Juniata 's program in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics combines the perspectives of three core liberal arts disciplines that offer powerful tools for understanding. By working across traditional disciplinary boundaries, students are encouraged to question their own assumptions, to become independent in their quest for knowledge, and to form the pattern for a lifetime of learning. The program aims to enable students to be thoughtful citizens of the 21st century world, and to prepare them for careers in business, government, or education. Students take a core group of courses in each department, develop a concentration in one area, and participate in two interdisciplinary seminars.

Special programs, facilities, or equipment:

Programs of Emphasis:

Internship/Research Experiences:

Courses:

Physics

Department Website:

https://www.juniata.edu/academics/departments/physics/

Faculty:

Background Information:

The term Physics derives from an ancient Greek word meaning “knowledge of nature.”  Physics is the natural science that studies matter, space and time, energy and force, and their interactions.  As such, Physics is one of the most fundamental scientific disciplines, and with its inclusion of astronomy, one of the oldest.   The discipline strives to understand and quantify the laws that govern the behavior of the universe.  The study, therefore, becomes fundamental to a deeper understanding of subjects such as chemistry, biology, astronomy, and engineering. A preeminent example of using physics knowledge and skills to further humankind’s understanding of nature is 1970 graduate, Dr. William Phillips, who shared the 1997 Nobel Prize in Physics for cooling and trapping atoms with laser light.

Engineering Physics studies many the same advanced physics topics as physics majors and prepares students to work in the private sector, in national laboratories, or to pursue a dual degree with one of our affiliated partners or an advanced degree in engineering. 

Special programs, facilities, or equipment:

Program of Emphasis 

Individualized Programs of Emphasis include:

Secondary Emphasis:

*The Department may waive the Modern Physics Lab requirement if the student is taking Physical Chemistry Lab as part of a Chemistry POE, and they are taking two or more additional physics courses at the 300 or 400 level beyond PC 301.

Internship/External Research Experiences include:

Specific department policy:

Awarding credit for AP exam scores:  A student with an AP score of 4 or 5 in Physics 1, Physics 2, Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism, or Physics C: Mechanics will get 3 credits for each such exam score, up to 6 credits total.
credit for AP exam scores:  A student with an AP score of 4 or 5 in Physics I, Physics II, Physics B, Physics C will get 3 credits each up to 6 credits total.

Courses:

PC-189   Physics Seminar I (Fall; Yearly; 1.00 Credit) Seminar series, required of all freshmen Physics/Physics-Engineering POEs, consisting of research seminars given by invited speakers and members of the department, both faculty and students. Discussions regarding specific career opportunities and preparation for graduate studies will also be an integral part of the seminar series.

PC-199   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Entry level treatment of a variety of academic/practical experiences in physics such as Microcontroller Electronics and Physics Phun Night Practicum. Note: Students may take each ST: course for credit.

PC-200   General Physics I (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N,QM) An algebra-based introduction to the basic principles of mechanics (including periodic motion, fluid static's and dynamics), heat and thermodynamics, molecular theory and wave motion (including acoustics). Note: a working knowledge of algebra and trigonometry is required. Corequisite: PC200L.

PC-200L   General Physics Lab I (Fall; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; N) An introductory algebra-based laboratory experience designed to accompany PC200. The individual experiments will involve topics in mechanics, energy, sound, and waves. Labs Involve computer acquisition of data for some experiments. Note: A special fee is assessed. Corequisites: PC200.

PC-201   General Physics II (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N,QM) An algebra-based introduction to basic principles of electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic waves, and optics. Additional topics may include atoms and molecules, nuclear physics, relativity and solid state physics. Note: A working knowledge of algebra and trigonometry is required. Corequisite: PC-201L. Prerequisite: PC-200.

PC-201L   General Physics Lab II (Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; N) An algebra-based introductory laboratory experience designed to accompany PC201. The individual experiments will involve topics in circuits, light and optics, and nuclear physics. Involves computer acquisition of data for some experiments. Note: A special fee is assessed. Corequisite: PC201.

PC-202   Intro Physics I (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N,QM) A calculus-based introduction to the basic principles of mechanics (including periodic motion and dynamics), heat and thermodynamics, and special relativity. Corequisite: PC-202L and Corequisite or Prerequisite: MA130.

PC-202L   Intro Physics Lab I (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; N) This lab is a calculus-based introductory laboratory experience that is designed to accompany PC202. Individual experiments will correlate with the course, including kinematics, Newton's Laws, energy, and momentum. Note: A special fee is assessed. Corequisite: PC202.

PC-203   Intro Physics II (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N,QM) A calculus-based introduction to basic principles of electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic waves and optics. Additional topics may include atoms and molecules, nuclear physics, relativity and solid state physics. Corequisite: PC-203L. Prerequisite: PC-202 or PC-204.

PC-203L   Intro Physics Lab II (Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; N) An algebra-based introductory laboratory experience designed to accompany PC203. The individual experiments will involve topics in circuits, light and optics, and nuclear physics. Prerequisite: PC-202 or PC-204. Corequisite: PC-203.

PC-204   University Physics (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N,QM,WK-FR) A calculus-based introduction to the basic principles of mechanics (including periodic motion, statics, and dynamics), heat and thermodynamics, and special relativity. This course includes an integrated introductory laboratory experience. This course is designed to be taken by students interested in a POE in Physics or Engineering Physics. Note: a special fee is assessed. Pre- or Co-Reqs: MA-130; FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

PC-209   Electronics (Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; N) An introduction to the theory and application of analog and digital electronics, starting with basic AC and DC circuits. The unit explains the principles of operation of the power supply, amplifier, oscillator, logic circuits, micro controllers, and other basic circuits. An associated laboratory component allows construction of and measurements on the circuits under consideration. Note: a special fee is assessed.

PC-211   Environmental Physics (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N,QM) A standalone course in physics focusing on natural processes and environmental technologies using physical concepts from mechanics, energy, thermodynamics, electromagnetic radiation, atomic spectra, fluid flow, atmospheric processes, sound waves and radioactivity. Designed for environmental science and geology students, those taking this course cannot take other algebra-based (PC200/201) or calculus-based (PC202/203) introductory physics courses. A working knowledge of algebra and trigonometry is required. Corequisite: PC211L.

PC-211L   Environmental Physics Lab (Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; N) An introductory laboratory experience designed to accompany PC211. Individual experiment will focus on natural processes and environmental technologies using physical concepts from mechanics, energy, thermodynamics, electromagnetic radiation, atomic spectra, fluid flow, atmospheric processes, sound waves and radioactivity. Note: A special fee is assessed. Corequisites: PC211.

PC-239   Nuclear Threat (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; CA,N,H,CW,WK-SP) This course examines the development and ramifications of nuclear weapons. Students will learn the basic physics upon which these devices operate, and explore moral issues that arose in the interactions of communities impacted by their construction, use, and testing, including the perspectives of scientists, government officials, and affected citizenry. Current issues and concerns regarding nuclear weapons will be studied as well.

PC-289   Physics Seminar II (Fall; Yearly; 1.00 Credit) Seminar series, required of all sophomore Physics/Physics-Engineering POEs, consisting of research seminars given by invited speakers and members of the department, both faculty and students. Discussions regarding specific career opportunities and preparation for graduate studies will also be an integral part of the seminar series. Prerequisites: PC189.

PC-299   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Entry level treatment of a variety of academic/practical experiences in physics such as Musical Acoustics and Physics Phun Night Practicum. Note: Students may take each ST: course for credit.

PC-300   Intermediate Physics Lab (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N,CW) The origin and progress of physics in the 20th century, including relativity and quantum theory with applications in atomic and molecular physics, nuclear physics, elementary particles and possibly some solid state physics. Prerequisites: MA-230 and PC-203. Corequisite: PC-301. (Previously titled Modern Physics Lab)

PC-301   Modern Physics (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) The origins and progress of Physics in the 20th century, including relativity and quantum theory with applications in atomic and molecular physics, nuclear physics, elementary particles and possibly some solid state physics. Prerequisites: MA-230 or PC-203. Corequisite: MA-235. (Previously titled as Theoretical Modern Physics)

PC-307   Advanced Physics Lab (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N,QS,CW) Provides laboratory projects at the intermediate level. A series of projects is offered which best meet the educational needs of the student. Prerequisite: PC300. Special fee assessed.

PC-320   Engineering Mechanics I: Statics (Fall; Variable; 3.00 Credits; N) A problem-solving approach to applied mechanics involving equilibrium of co-planar and non-planar force systems, analysis of frames and trusses, friction, centroids and moments of inertia. Prerequisite: PC202 or PC204.

PC-321   Engineering Mechanics II: Dynamics (Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; N) A problem-solving approach to applied mechanics involving the kinematics and kinetics of particles and rigid bodies. Techniques involving Newton's laws, work-energy and impulse momentum are presented and used extensively. Prerequisite: PC320.

PC-340   Mathematical Methods in Physics (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) An introduction to the mathematics used in advanced physical science courses. The emphasis is on early exposure to mathematical techniques and their applications rather than on rigorous derivation. Topics include series analysis, complex variables, theory, matrix mechanics, ordinary and partial differential equations, vector and tensor analysis, and Fourier series. Prerequisites: PC203 and MA230.

PC-350   Thermodynamics (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) An intermediate level course treating the concept of temperature and its measurement, the concepts of heat and work, the laws of thermodynamics, applications of these concepts to physical systems, the elements of statistical mechanics and as many topics of current concern as time allows. Prerequisites: MA235 and PC301.

PC-389   Physics Seminar III (Fall; Yearly; 1.00 Credit) Seminar series, required of all junior Physics/Physics-Engineering POEs, consisting of research seminars given by invited speakers and members of the department, both faculty and students. Discussions regarding specific career opportunities and preparation for graduate studies will also be an integral part of the seminar series. Prerequisite: PC289.

PC-395   Integrated Physics (Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit) This course is a problem-oriented integrative review of physics using a calculus-based introductory physics text and selected advanced texts used in follow-on courses. The course consists of student self-study, weekly questions and exams, and assigned material to study. Students prepare short write-ups of answers to questions and make class presentations of these questions and topics. Junior or senior class level is required.

PC-399   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Intermediate to advanced level treatment of a variety of areas within physics such as solid state physics, astrophysics, general relativity, and medical physics. Note: Students may take each ST: course for credit.

PC-402   Quantum Mechanics (Fall; Odd Years; 4.00 Credits; N) This course continues the discussion of the Schrodinger Equation, the particle-in-a-box, the harmonic oscillator, angular momentum, the hydrogen atom, and electron spin started in PC300 and/or CH305, but at a level that is mathematically much more detailed and proceeds from the postulates of quantum mechanics in a logical manner. With this beginning, the course then focuses on more complex problems such as the behavior of multi-electron atoms and molecules. Issues of the meaning of measurement such as embodied in the EPR paradox, the Bell Inequality, and the interpretation of associated experiments are also discussed. The course is heavily problem oriented requiring a strong mathematical background. Additional mathematics background such as PC340 and/or MA335 is suggested in addition to the formal prerequisites of MA235 and PC300 or CH305.

PC-410   Mechanics (Fall; Odd Years; 4.00 Credits; N) A study of classical mechanics including Newtonian, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian approaches. Emphasis is placed on developing the student's ability to analyze physical problems involving particles, systems of particles and rigid bodies. Insight is provided into a variety of techniques for solving such problems. Prerequisites: PC-203 and MA-335.

PC-430   Optics (Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; N) The wave theory of light as applied to interference, diffraction, polarization, and image formation. Major emphasis on Fourier techniques. Study of geometrical optics, quantum optics, and radiometry as time permits. Prerequisites: PC300 or PC301.

PC-450   Physics Research I (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00-4.00 Credits; N) An opportunity for the student to do an independent research project under the guidance of a faculty member. Note: listed as Research: (title); may be taken multiple times for credit. Prerequisite: permission.

PC-451   Physics Research II (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00-4.00 Credits; N) An opportunity for students to do a more advanced independent research project under the guidance of a faculty member. Prerequisite: by permission.

PC-489   Physics Seminar IV (Fall; Yearly; 1.00 Credit) Seminar series, required of all senior Physics/Physics-Engineering POEs, consisting of research seminars given by invited speakers and members of the department, both faculty and students. Discussions regarding specific career opportunities and preparation for graduate studies will also be an integral part of the seminar series. Prerequisite: PC389, and restricted to Seniors with POE of Physics or Engineering Physics.

PC-490   Physics Internship (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 2.00-9.00 Credits; N) See chapter, " Special Programs " under internships. Note: may be repeated up to a total of 9 hours of credit. Corequisite: PC495. Prerequisite: permission and Junior or Senior standing.

PC-491   Electricity & Magnetism (Fall; Even Years; 4.00 Credits; N) A study of electromagnetic phenomena, including electrostatics, electric fields in matter, magnetostatics, magnetic fields in matter, introductory electrodynamics including Maxwell's equations, and electromagnetic waves, potentials, and fields. Corequisite: PC340. Prerequisite: PC203.

PC-495   Internship Seminar/Research (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 2.00-6.00 Credits; N) Requires students to reflect on the internship experience and/or pursue research related to the placement. Corequisite: PC490. Prerequisite: permission.

PC-499   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows the department to offer titles not normally offered. Prerequisites vary by course.

PC-TUT   PC Teaching Assistant (Variable; Variable; 1.00-6.00 Credits) See Catalog.

Politics

Department Website:

https://www.juniata.edu/academics/departments/politics/

Faculty:

Background Information:

Politics is among the oldest of the Western liberal arts. It traces its origins to Greek city-states of the classical period, and specifically to the city of Athens and the figure of Socrates. Even today, Socrates’ tragic confrontation with the authority of the city informs Western ideas of individualism and community. Politics is everywhere in human life, and this department takes a comprehensive view of its subject matter. Juniata’s Politics Department provides professional training within a liberal arts framework. We prepare students for careers in government, business, journalism, the non-profit sector, and many other fields as well as graduate school or law school.

Special programs, facilities, or equipment:

Programs of Emphasis:

Examples of Individualized Programs of Emphasis:

Secondary Emphasis:

Internship/Research Experiences:

Courses:

PS-101   Introduction to U.S. Government (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; S,WK-SI) An introduction to the theory and practice of U.S. government. The course surveys the underlying structure of American politics, its economic, cultural and legal foundations and the daily practice of politics, e.g. groups, parties, and the mass media. Requisite: FYC-101, EN-110, or EN-109 must be taken prior to or concurrently with this course.

PS-102   Introduction to International Politics (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; S,I,SW-GE) In this course we examine some of the dominant theoretical frameworks in international relations. We examine the most powerful international organizations. We assess these from the perspective of non-Western cultural frameworks. Pre-Req or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

PS-110   Exploring the Law (Variable; Yearly; 1.00 Credit) An introduction to the legal profession, exploring the process of applying to law school, the variety of jobs in law, and how an undergraduate program can best prepare students for success.

PS-125   Citizenship (Variable; Variable; 4.00 Credits; SW-ER) What do citizens owe to fellow citizens at the local, national, and global levels? This course contemplates this question by examining the role of citizens in civil society. It examines citizens' social responsibility to others. It fosters each citizen's sense of empathy toward other citizens (including toward citizens living in different circumstances or having different worldviews) by exploring the social contexts of public policy problems. Using ethical reasoning, citizens will understand the ethics of citizenship in different settings and traditions. Citizens will consider the ramifications of enacting alternative public policies on the well-being of fellow citizens and of civil society. Pre-Req or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

PS-155   Lobbying (Spring; Variable; 1.00 Credit; S) Students learn about lobbying in the United Statesand Pennsylvania, including the national and state constitutional provisions that permit and restrain lobbying. Students study and discuss lobbying techniques and ethics and the place of lobbying in the broader context of American and Pennsylvanian politics. Students will practice their lobbying skills both in class and in Harrisburg.

PS-190A   Mock Trial (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; CS) A study of elements related to the preparation of a trial through the Mock Trial setting governed by the American Mock Trial Association. Students will learn the preparation of pleadings, applicable case law to the case presented, and obtain knowledge of the Rules of Evidence. Each year, Mock Trial is offered as PS-190A during the fall semester for 3 credits and PS-190B during the spring semester for 1 credit.

PS-190B   Mock Trial (Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; CS) A study of elements related to the preparation of a trial through the Mock Trial setting governed by the American Mock Trial Association. Students will learn the preparation of pleadings, applicable case law to the case presented, and obtain knowledge of the Rules of Evidence. Each year, Mock Trial is offered as PS-190A during the fall semester for 3 credits and PS-190B during the spring semester for 1 credit. Pre-Req: PS-190A

PS-199   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows the departments to offer special topics not normally offered. Departments may offer more than one special topic. Prerequisites vary by title.

PS-206   The Culture War (Variable; Variable; 4.00 Credits; CA,S,SW-US) Is the U.S. at war with itself over core political and cultural values? This culture war is waged over hot-button policy issues including abortion, school prayer, gay rights, religion in politics, marijuana, immigration, and diversity. Students explore the complex political contexts that shape the lived experiences of traditionally marginalized groups and examine how power, privilege, and marginalization influence policy outcomes.

PS-208   Policy and Community (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; SW-LE) In this course, students will engage in the policymaking process in Huntingdon. In conjunction with local policymakers, students will research a community problem and make policy recommendations based on that research. Class discussions will focus on common community issues in America (such as environmental and healthcare problems) in addition to research methods and local policymaking processes. Prerequisite or corequisite: FYC or CWS

PS-209   Sexual Politics (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S,WK-SI) In this course, we will discuss sex and gender in political theory and practice. In part one, we will discuss key concepts needed to understand sex and gender politics in the United States. In part two, we will build on this knowledge by exploring sex/gender/sexuality issues in our current political environment. Pre- or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

PS-218   Public Policy & Admin. (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S) An introduction to the study of public policy and its administration. The course explores the ways which power, knowledge and institutions shape adoption and evolution of public policies in western democracies. Focusing on various policy areas, the course also surveys the public bureaucracies that administer these policies, examining what government agencies do and why they do it, and assesses alternatives to public bureaucracies. Prerequisite: PS101.

PS-221   American Political Thought (Variable; Variable; 4.00 Credits; H,CW,SW-US) Covers development of American Political Thought from the Revolution to the modern-day. Special attention is given to the tension between liberty and equality in our system, especially as those tensions are revealed in writings of women and African-American writers.

PS-222   Western Political Thought (Variable; Variable; 4.00 Credits; H,WK-HT) Surveys selected works of philosophers from Plato to Nietzsche. The course will focus on enduring questions -- what is the good, the nature of the best regime, how do freedom and authority intersect, and so on. Pre-Req or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109

PS-230A   Political Party Conventions (Variable; Irregular/On Demand; 1.00-2.00 Credits; S) This course is an experiential education opportunity that takes place in the city that hosts either the Democratic National Convention or the Republican National Convention. It takes place every four years during presidential election years in the late summer or early fall. Each student decides whether he or she wishes to attend the program associated with the Democratic Party or the Republican Party. It is an intense, two-week seminar that features presentations by leading academics and practitioners about the presidential election, including the nomination campaign, the national party conventions, and the general election. The seminar also features site visits, fieldwork assignments, and small group discussions focused on these experiences and the course readings. The seminar culminates in the public events that comprise the Democratic National Convention or the Republican National Convention. Requires consent of the instructor and pre-payment of required course fees.

PS-230B   Presidential Inauguration (Variable; Variable; 1.00-2.00 Credits; S) This course is an experiential education opportunity that takes place in Washington, D.C. every four years during the inauguration of the president. It is an intense, 10-day seminar that features presentations by leading academics and practitioners about the presidency and presidential elections; site visits to embassies, government agencies, think tanks, media outlets, etc.; and small group discussions focused on these experiences and the course readings. The seminar culminates in the public events that comprise the presidential inauguration. Requires consent of the instructor and pre-payment of required course fees.

PS-230C   Inside Washington, D.C. (Variable; Variable; 1.00-2.00 Credits; S) This course is an experiential education opportunity that takes place in Washington, D.C. It is an intense seminar that features presentations by leading academics and practitioners about politics and the media, congressional elections, and presidential/congressional relations. The seminar includes site visits to embassies, government agencies, think tanks, media outlets, etc. with the aim of providing first-hand opportunities to witness government decision-making in action, as well as the efforts others on The Hill who try to influence government outcomes. Requires consent of the instructor and pre-payment of required course fees.

PS-230E   National Security (Summer; Variable; 1.00 Credit; S) This course is an experiential education opportunity that takes place in Washington, D.C. It is an intense, week-long academic seminar. Students explore the inner workings of the U.S. national security landscape with nationally recognized journalists, politicians, political analysts, and scholars as your guides. The course expands knowledge of American and international politics through on-site visits to such places as Capitol Hill, executive agencies, embassies, think tanks, and media organizations. Students engage in and network with nationally and internationally recognized public officials and business professionals to develop a sense of civic engagement and enhance leadership skills. Requires consent of the instructor and may require pre-payment of required course fees.

PS-235   Migration (Fall & Spring; Variable; 2.00 Credits; I,S,SW-GE) This is a two-course series (PS-235/236). The pre-departure course (PS-235) examines the full range of policy issues related to migration in North America. The summer or winter term course (PS-236) includes travels to southern Mexico, where professors and students from the Autonomous University of Chiapas (UNACH) will help students to gain first-hand insight into Mexico's migration policies through lectures, discussions, and visits to government migration detention centers. In addition to learning from the UNACH scholars, students will learn about Mexican culture from their homestay families. Students must complete both courses in the series to fulfill a Global Engagement course requirement. The total course fee is divided equally between PS-235 and PS-236.

PS-236   Eyewitness to Migration in Mexico (Variable; Variable; 1.00 Credit; I,S,SW-GE) This two-course series (PS-235/236) The fall semester pre-departure course examines the full range of policy issues related to migration in North America. The winter course/trip travels to southern Mexico, where professors and students from the Autonomous University of Chiapas (UNACH) will help students to gain first-hand insight into Mexico's migration policies through lectures, discussions, and visits to government migration detention centers. In addition to learning from the UNACH scholars, students will learn about Mexican culture from their homestay families. Students must complete both courses in the series to fulfill a Global Engagement course requirement. The total course fee is divided equally between PS-235 and PS-236.Pre-Req: PS-235.

PS-241   European Politics (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S,I) Examines the modern history, political culture, institutions and policies of the major West European states. Britain, France, West Germany and the European Communities are compared along with selected other countries. The major problems confronting these are highlighted. Prerequisite: PS101 or PS102.

PS-243   U.S. Foreign Policy (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S,I) Examines U.S. Foreign Policy from the Monroe Doctrine to the New World Order. Special emphasis is given to the tension between isolationism and globalism in this century. The course will focus on contemporary issues such as: the relationship with the UN, the U.S. as a global policeman, and the role of human rights as an American priority. Prerequisite: PS102.

PS-249   Senegambia I (Variable; Variable; 2.00 Credits; I,S,CA,SW-GE) In the pre-departure course (PS-249) on campus, we study and discuss Gambia's history and contemporary politics and culture. This is followed by a short-term study abroad course(PS-25), during which we spend three weeks exploring the political culture and society of The Gambia. Students must complete both PS-249 and PS-250 to fulfill the Cultural Analysis or Global Engagement requirements.

PS-250   Senegambia II (Variable; Yearly; 2.00 Credits; CA,I,S,SW-GE) These courses (PS249 and PS250) are co-requisites. In the fall semester, we study and discuss Gambia's history and contemporary politics and culture. During the winter break, we spend three weeks exploring the political culture and society of The Gambia. Corequisite: PS250. Students must complete both PS249 and PS250 to receive CA credit. If you want to get Global Engagement credit, after returning from the trip you must complete a 1-credit course that has been approved by the Global Education Committee.

PS-289   Politics and the Media (Variable; Variable; 4.00 Credits; S,CW) This course has two components. First, it looks at the interaction of politics and the media in the context of the United States. Students will learn about how politicians use the media and about how the media covers politics. Second, it is designed to help students hone their research and writing skills. The class involves extensive class discussion, applications of course materials to contemporary coverage of American politics in the media, and instruction about research and writing. Students will be required to pay close attention to the interaction of politics and the media during the course of the semester.Prerequisites: PS101.

PS-291   Mexican Fulbright Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-3.00 Credits; I,S,SW-GE) This comparative politics course will provide a significant degree of attention to the operation of society and government in a country other than the United States. It will focus on a people and culture outside of the U.S. or on a global challenge. The course will often relate to Mexico or to U.S.-Mexico relations. The specific topic of this course will be determined based on the interests of the Mexico Studies Chair and the needs of the Politics Department.

PS-298   Gender and Health Care (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; SW-ER) In this course, we will discuss gender and healthcare policy around the world, focusing on the ethical responsibilities of healthcare policymakers and providers. We consider how gender affects policy and health outcomes in various ways, depending on the cultural context. Class discussions will address topics such as reproductive rights and LGBTQ healthcare access. Pre-Req or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109

PS-299   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits; I,S) Offers supplements to the regular departmental program, exploring topics and areas not regularly scheduled. Note: Students may take each ST: course for credit.

PS-305   Politics in Film (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H,F,SW-ER) This course is designed as an introduction to the study of ethical ideas as presented in motion pictures. We will look both at the direct representation of political ideas or points of view (especially through satire), and at the way Hollywood has shaped our ideas about the process of ethical decision-making. Pre-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

PS-311   Constitutional Interp: Powers of Govt Government (Variable; Variable; 4.00 Credits; H) An examination of the three branches of government, their constitutional powers, and the limitations on those powers as interpreted by Supreme Court. Special attention is given to the areas of delegated and concurrent powers. The operation of the Supreme Court and the Federal court system are also reviewed. Prerequisite: PS-101.

PS-312   Constitutional Interp.: Civil Rights Rights (Variable; Variable; 4.00 Credits; H,CW) Examines citizen's rights and liberties which the Constitution protects against infringement by the government. Those freedoms enumerated in the Bill of Rights are reviewed as well as the right to privacy, due process, and equal protection. Prerequisites: PS101 or permission.

PS-313   Congress and Presidency (Variable; Variable; 4.00 Credits; S,CW) Examines the intellectual and constitutional foundations of Congress and the Presidency, and the evolution of their powers and responsibilities. The course also explores how, through cooperation and confrontation, the institutions make decisions about war and peace, spending, and taxation. Prerequisite: It is recommended that students take PS-101 prior to this course, but not required.

PS-318   Parties, Elections & Campaigns (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S) Examines the role political parties and elections play in democratic theory and practice in the U.S. Topics include party systems in the U.S., history, party organization, comparisons with parties in other countries, electoral competition, and elite mass linkages. Contemporary issues such as campaign finance, campaign strategy, and the role of the mass media are also explored. Prerequisite: PS101.

PS-320   Topics Political Philos & Jurisprudence (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; H) Examines specific topics in the area of political philosophy and law. Topics will include " Foundations of American Constitutionalism, " " African-American Social and Political Thought, " " Liberalism, " and " Shakespeare's Politics. " Students may take each course for credit.

PS-330   TPP: Topics in Public Policy (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S) Examines the formation and implementation of public policy by an in-depth focus on a single policy area. The course will investigate a particular policy area for the semester, such as environmental policy or health care policy. Policy study will include analysis of interest groups, public opinion, congressional committees and federal agencies. Research and analytical exercise will be emphasized. Prerequisite: PS101.

PS-334   Human Rights (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; I,S) This class focuses on some of the debates concerning human rights: realism versus idealism; individualism versus communitarianism; universalism versus relativism; religious fundamentalism versus secularism; women's rights as human rights; liberalism versus socialism. We review the historical evolution of human rights. We devote part of the semester to the role of literature and the arts in creating and promoting human rights. Prerequisite: PS102.

PS-335   Law of Nations (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; I,S) This course explores the substance of modern international law. Course topics may include the Vienna Convention, the UN Charter, the Law of the Sea Convention, the Rome Statute, the International Court of Justice, and the International Criminal Court. The course also explores how nation states interact with these bodies under their internal laws and customary international law. Prerequisite: PS 102.

PS-340   Topics in International Politics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits; S,I) Examines international politics in light of a specific topic or issue. The topics include themes such as: Global Environmental Politics, Nationalism, and Competing World Ideologies.

PS-346   African Politics (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; I,S,CW) This course examines some of the factors that explain the political problems that plague Africa. Topics include: colonialism, human rights, corruption, ethnicity and pan-Africanism. Prerequisite: PS102.

PS-349   Senegambia III (Variable; Variable; 1.00 Credit; I,S,SW-GE) This course will meet 1 hour per week in spring semester. A requirement of the course is to participate in a three week summer trip to West Africa. During the spring semester we will examine the history and contemporary politics and economics of the Senegambia region. At the conclusion of the spring semester we will spend 3 weeks exploring the political culture and society of the Gambia and Senegal in West Africa. There is a fee for the trip to Africa. Corequisite: PS250. If PS249 and PS250 are completed they will count as CA. PS349/350 will not.

PS-350   Senegambia IV (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; I,S,SW-GE) See PS249. Corequisite: PS349. Students must complete PS249 and PS250 to receive CA credit. A course fee is applied.

PS-389   TWC: Washington Special Topics (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00-4.00 Credits) This course is for students participating in the Washingon Center's internship program in Washington, D.C. Each student will select one of several courses offered by the Washington Center upon acceptance into the program. The title of this Special Topics course will vary according to the course the student enrolls in through the Washington Center.

PS-399   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Offers supplements to the regular departmental program, exploring topics and areas not regularly scheduled. Examples include Religious Revivalism in the Third World, Race, Religion and Gender in American politics and Nationalism in Europe. Note: abbreviated ST:(Title); students may take each ST: course for credit.

PS-490   Legal & Public Affairs Internship (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 2.00-9.00 Credits; S) An opportunity to apply concepts and theories learned in class and readings to a practical situation. Selected students work with chief administrative officers in State College and Huntingdon, police departments, environmental departments, legal offices or in the Court House. Note: may be repeated up to a total of 9 hours credit. Corequisite: PS495. Prerequisite: permission and Jr. or Sr. Standing.

PS-491   Washington Interns (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 2.00-9.00 Credits; S) See the chapter, " Special Programs " in the catalog under " Internships. " Corequisite: PS495. Prerequisite: permission.

PS-492   Harrisburg Legislative Interns (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 2.00-9.00 Credits; S) A unique opportunity to experience the legislative process. Placements are made to the research staffs of various committees (e.g., Banking and Commerce, Education, Judiciary, Local Government and Urban Affairs) of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives. Committees are selected on the basis of student interests and needs in the Legislature. Corequisite: PS495. Prerequisite: Permission and Sophomore, Junior or Senior standing.

PS-495   Politics Res/Seminar (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 2.00-6.00 Credits; S) Required of all students holding internships. The emphasis is on readings and discussions of materials relevant to the intern ship experience, e.g., professional behavior, ethical conduct, confidentiality, etc. Students produce a major research paper on a topic selected by the student in conjunction with the internship supervisor and the course instructor. Note: may be repeated up to a total of 6 hours credit. Corequisite: PS490 or PS491 or PS492. Prerequisite: Minimum GPA of 2.50 and good academic standing required for internship eligibility. Development of internship proposal must occur a minimum of six weeks prior to start of internship. Prerequisite: 2.50 GPA, Permission and Jr. or Sr. standing. Corequisite: PS490 or PS491 or PS492.

PS-497   Honors Research I (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Designed to offer exceptional students the opportunity to engage in an extensive undergraduate thesis or research project. Selected students will be invited by the faculty of the department to propose a subject of special interest to the students; working closely with at least one member of the department, students will develop and complete a research project in the first semester and present the results as a publishable paper in the second. Available by permission.

PS-498   Honors Research II (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Designed to offer exceptional students the opportunity to complete the research paper started in PS497. Prerequisite: PS497.

PS-499   Senior Seminar (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Intended as a capstone experience in the discipline and designed to engage students in their final year in the comprehensive study of a major question or issue confronting the discipline of political science. Prerequisites: PS101 or PS102 or PS222 and senior standing and three additional Political Science courses or departmental permission.

PS-TUT   Political Science Teaching Assistant (Variable; Variable; 1.00-3.00 Credits; S) See Tutorial in the catalog.

Psychology

Department Website:

https://www.juniata.edu/academics/departments/psychology/

Faculty:

Background Information:

The mission of the Department of Psychology at Juniata College is to offer an education that exposes students to both the breadth and depth of modern psychological science. We emphasize the scientific study of behavior and mental processes in order to both understand and improve the world we live in. We strive to offer our students quality classroom instruction, hands-on research, and internship opportunities. In service of this mission, the psychology program has aligned its learning goals with the Guidelines for the Undergraduate Psychology Major, published by the American Psychological Association.

Special programs, facilities, or equipment:

Programs of Emphasis:

Individualized Programs of Emphasis:

Secondary Emphasis:

Internship/Research Experiences:

Specific department policy:

 

Awarding credit for AP Exam scores: Awarding credit for AP Exam scores: If a student has a score of 4 or 5 on the AP Psychology exam, they will be awarded credit for PY 101, Introduction to Psychology. The student is free to enroll in other departmental courses that have PY 101 as a prerequisite.

Courses:

PY-101   Introduction to Psychology (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) An overview of the content and methodology in the field. Topics such as the history of psychology, physiological psychology, learning and memory, perception, motivation, child development, personality and social foundations are considered

PY-190   Introduction to Poverty Studies (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) The Introduction to Poverty Studies course will offer students an interdisciplinary exposure to the study of poverty, challenging them to explore the ways in which factors such as class, culture, race, gender, and geographic place operate to form an interrelated system that produces poverty and alters the trajectory of many important life outcomes. Among other course objectives, students will gain an evidence-based understanding of theoretical models of poverty and the ways in which poverty manifests differently within this country and across the globe.

PY-199   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows the department to offer special topics not normally offered. Departments may offer more than one special topic. Prerequisites and fees vary by title.

PY-202   Personality (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) A consideration of representative approaches to the study of human personality, beginning with standard theoretical approaches and their applications. This is followed by a consideration of selected topics within the field of personality, e.g. aggression, sexuality, dependency, and competence. Prerequisite: PY 101

PY-203   Abnormal Psychology (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) A brief consideration is given to the historical approaches to " mental illness, " followed by a consideration of present day classification, diagnostic measures, and therapy. Emphasis throughout is upon experimental data as applied to the various disorders. Prerequisite: PY101.

PY-205   Social Psychology (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) The study of human interaction and interpersonal relationships, including selected areas of current research and theory such as social perception, interpersonal communication, attitude formation and change, conformity, aggression, and interpersonal attraction.

PY-210   Psych Professional Development Seminar (Variable; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; S) This course explores professional opportunities in the field of psychology and related fields. You will assess your professional skills and interests and create materials needed for a successful internship, job, or graduate school search. We also will explore how professional knowledge and skills can be shared as future engaged and effective members of communities.

PY-211   Race, Ethnicity, and Identity Studies (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S,WK-SI) This course explores the constructs of race, ethnicity, and identity with a focus on how they help us understand ourselves, societies, and the relationship between self and society. The course explores race, racism, antiracism, equality, and hierarchy. As a Social Inquiry course, this course emphasizes social scientific methodologies to address these topics. Pre- or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

PY-216   Public Health (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; S,N,WK-SP) This seminar serves as an introduction to evidence-based public health. The course will utilize public health methodologies to investigate historical and current public health issues. Pre-req or co-req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

PY-238   Biopsychology (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S,N) Focuses on neurobiology and neuroanatomy as they relate to sensory processes, motivation, reinforcement, learning, and memory. Prerequisites: PY101 or BI105 or permission.

PY-260   Research Methods & Statistics I (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; CW,Q,S) Part one of a two-part sequence of Research Methods and Statistics for Psychology. This course focuses on becoming a better research producer and a research consumer from a psychological science perspective. Students will learn to think critically about media claims and accurately summarize primary source articles about behavior. Students will learn to use statistical software to accurately describe data. Students will learn to communicate effectively about research through written and oral work and make ethical judgments informed by APA ethical standards. Students will design and execute their own individual research studies. Prerequisite: PY-101

PY-270   Cognitive Neuroscience (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S,N) Focuses on the neural mechanisms of mental processes including sensation and perception, attention, memory, reasoning, and decision making. Topics include basic neuroanatomy, functional imaging techniques, and evidence from neurotypical and clinical populations. Prerequisites: PY101.

PY-299   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows the department to offer special topics not normally offered. Departments may offer more than one special topic. Prerequisites vary by title.

PY-302   Moral Judgment (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S,SW-ER,CTGES) This course will cover basic issues relevant to understanding and evaluating moral judgment. We will compare philosophical models of human judgment with psychological models of human judgment. You will apply both philosophical and psychological models to contemporary ethical issues and reflect on your own beliefs and social responsibilities.

PY-303   Learning & Conditioning (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Explores the issue of how we are changed by experience, using primarily a behaviorist perspective, applied to animal and human data. Both theory and applied applications of theory will be considered. Prerequisite: PY101.

PY-304   Cognitive Psychology (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Explores an array of issues in human memory, primarily from a cognitive/information processing point of view. Major emphasis is on using research data to formulate answers to both theoretical and applied questions. Prerequisite: PY101.

PY-312   Cultural Psychology (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Cultural psychology is the scientific study of how cultural norms influence how individuals think, feel, and behave. Cultural psychologists study the ultimate social situation: culture. Questions from this field are relevant to our everyday lives and are important in shaping our understanding of ourselves and views of others.

PY-321   Health Psychology (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Course will examine empirical findings from disciplines of psychology, medicine, and public health. Course topics include research methods, stress and social support, health behavior and primary prevention, management of chronic/terminal illnesses, gender and cultural issues in health, and psychoneuroimmunology. An underlying theme will be to dispel health-related myths and fads that are so prevalent in the popular media. Prerequisites: PY101.

PY-322   Sport Psychology (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) This course provides an overview of sport psychology. Students will gain insight into the psychological processes involved in sport and other fields involving human performance. Topics such as motivation, arousal and stress, burnout, skill acquisition, team dynamics, and psychological skills training will be explored as they relate to maximizing our ability to perform at a high level. Pre-Req: PY-101

PY-340   Research in Psychology (Fall; Yearly; 2.00 Credits; S) Allows students to become involved in an ongoing research program. Students will be required to read primary literature from the specific field of investigation and become involved in execution of an ongoing experiment. Students will be expected to perform the activities relevant to the experiment, assist in the analysis of the data, and write an APA style paper based on the results of the experiment. Prerequisites: PY101 and permission. Repeatable up to 3 times.

PY-341   Research in Psychology (Spring; Yearly; 2.00 Credits; S) Allows students to become involved in an ongoing research program. Students will be required to read primary literature from the specific field of investigation and become involved in execution of an ongoing experiment. Students will be expected to perform the activities relevant to the experiment, assist in the analysis of the data, and write an APA style paper based on the results of the experiment. Prerequisites: PY101 and permission. Repeatable up to 3 times.

PY-350   Developmental Psychology (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) This course is designed to integrate core topics in the discipline of developmental psychology with current key issues in society. Consequently, students will have the opportunity to analyze scientific literature and make connections to current, everyday life issues. Additionally, students will have the opportunity to explore developmental theory and its connection to public policy, known as " best practices " in parenting and education and consider developmental theory's influence on current trends in our broader society. Prerequisites: PY101 or ED120 or ED130.

PY-361   Research Methods & Stats Psychology II (Fall & Spring; All Years; 4.00 Credits; S,CW,QS) This course focuses on becoming a better research producer and a research consumer from a psychological science perspective. Students will learn to think critically about media claims and accurately summarize primary source articles about behavior. Students will learn to use statistical software to accurately describe data. Students will learn to communicate effectively about research through written and oral work and make ethical judgments informed by APA ethical standards. Students will design and execute their own individual research studies. Pre-Req: PY-101 and either PY-260 or PY-360.

PY-370   Intro Counseling Theories & Techniques (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) This course is an introduction to major theoretical perspectives and practice techniques employed in contemporary counseling and therapeutic environments, with an emphasis on individual and group processes. In addition to practical application activities (e.g., motivational interviewing), students will also be introduced to techniques and requirements necessary for establishing an appropriate therapeutic relationship and becoming a skilled helper, including ethical/legal considerations, consultation, referral, crisis counseling, and counseling research. By the end of the course, students should have a broad knowledge of counseling theories/theoretical orientations, basic counseling skills, and philosophies that support the building and maintenance of therapeutic relationships.

PY-375   Psychology of Emotion (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) This course introduces the scientific study of emotion (Affective Science). It examines the historical and philosophical origins of emotion but focuses on contemporary theories, concepts, and methods of study in emotion science; the relationship between emotion, cognition, and the brain; and variation in emotion phenomena related to gender, culture, and group processes. Pre- or Co-Requisite: PY-101 or SO-101

PY-399   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Variable: 1-4 credits. Occasional offerings in which a group of students and a professor explore an area of specialized interest in a seminar format. Recent offerings have been " Multicultural Psychology " and " Psychology of Gender. " Students may take each ST: course for credit.

PY-401   Comparative Psychology (Spring; Odd Years; 3.00 Credits; S,N,CS) Comparative Psychology examines the continuity of behavioral and psychological mechanisms between nonhuman animals and humans suggested by evolutionary theory. Attention is paid to the comparison between human and nonhuman animals on traditionally human characteristics, including self-recognition, language, culture, tool use, and several other characteristics. Prerequisites: PY101 or BI105 and Junior or Senior standing or permission of the instructor.

PY-402   Evolutionary Psychology (Spring; Even Years; 3.00 Credits; S,N,CS) This course uses the lens of modern evolutionary theory to understand human behavior. We will look for the influence of human evolutionary history on several modern human behaviors including, among others, dating and marriage, aggression, altruism, child-rearing, and behavioral differences between the sexes. Prerequisites: PY101 or BI105 and Junior or Senior standing or permission of the instructor.

PY-404   School Psychology (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; S,SW-LE) This course explores a scientist-practitioner model for improving learning and educational outcomes for all students. Focus is on the application of psychological principles and research-based models of prevention and intervention to improve outcomes. As a community-engaged learning course, coursework will be applied to a project identified by a community partner as meeting a community need. Pre-req: PY-101. Pre-req or co-req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

PY-412   Psychophysiology of Human Performance (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N,S,CS) What makes a great performer great? This course addresses this basic question by exploring various processes underlying skill learning and performance from a psychophysiological and neuroscientific perspective. Throughout the course, a model of effective learning and performance will be developed, discussed, and critiqued, guided by the unifying principle of efficiency. Pre-Reqs: PY-101.

PY-415   Capstone in Psychology (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S,CS) The purpose of this course is to assess the skills students acquire during their undergraduate career in the Psychology Department. Students will be expected to produce a written professional work. Pre-Req: PY-101 and senior class standing.

PY-490   Psychology Internship (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 2.00-9.00 Credits; S) See the chapter, " Special Programs " under Internships in the catalog. Corequisite: PY495. Prerequisite: permission and Jr. or Sr. standing.

PY-495   Psychology Internship Seminar (Variable; Variable; 2.00-6.00 Credits; S,SW-LE) This seminar will help you apply concepts from your academic work to your internship experience. It also is designed to enhance your professional, social, cultural, communication, reflective, and critical-thinking skills. We will explore the concept of community, strategies, and skills necessary for engaged community work, and benefits and limits of engagement with others within and across communities. Corequisite: PY-490. Requires instructor permission.

PY-499   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows the department to offer special topics not normally offered. Departments may offer more than one special topic. Prerequisites vary by title.

PY-TUT   Psychology Teaching Assistant (Variable; Variable; 1.00-5.00 Credits) See catalog.

Religious Studies

Department Website:

https://www.juniata.edu/academics/departments/religion/

Faculty:

Background Information:

The Religious Studies department engages in the interdisciplinary academic exploration of Religious phenomena. We do not assume that our students will have or desire a personal religious commitment, but instead study religions both for their own intrinsic interest and to understand how they shape the lived experience of religious and nonreligious people. Religious belief and practices impact the world in numerous ways: through historical events, philosophical debates, political transformations, and by shaping worldviews through sacred texts and ritual.    We approach religious phenomena through a variety of methods from the humanities, the social sciences, and the natural sciences.  Our program fosters both specific specialization in various domains of competence and general theories and methods for the study of religion. Our students learn to write and communicate persuasively, engage in close reading of texts and learn about the physical, biological, psychological and social dynamics governing religious behavior.  Our graduates are well prepared for graduate school, seminary and law school.

Special programs, facilities, or equipment:


Individualized Programs of Emphasis in Religious Studies:

Many of our students include Religious Studies in Individualized POEs with other departments including Anthropology, Biology, Environmental Studies, Peace and Conflict Studies, Philosophy, Psychology, and Theater.  Recent examples include:

Secondary Emphasis:

Courses:

RL-110   What Is Religion (Fall; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H,CW) This course serves as an introduction to religious studies. It engages some of the most important questions which preoccupy students of world religions. How do religions work? What kinds of issues does religion address?

RL-115   Viking Religion (Variable; Variable; 4.00 Credits; H,WK-HT) This course surveys the history, literature, religion, and culture of the Viking Age. We read the major mythologies of the Vikings, Sagas, and archeological evidence on practical aspects of Viking religious behaviors. We study cultural features such as housing, politics, blacksmithing, and shipbuilding. Pre- or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

RL-123   World Religions (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H,I,CS,SW-GE) This class looks at how global religions engage with contemporary challenges and issues. We will discuss scriptures, rituals, and current events primarily based on sources within each tradition. Pre-Req or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109. (Formerly titled Global Religions Today)

RL-131   Old Testament As History and Literature (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H,I) An introduction to the historical-critical reading of the Old Testament against the background of the history, politics, religion, literature, and culture of the ancient Middle East. This course studies how these Israelites texts were written and how their literary qualities shape their religious meanings.

RL-132   New Testament As History and Literature (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H) An introduction to the historical-critical reading of the New Testament against the background of the history, politics, religion, literature, and culture of the ancient Mediterranean world. This course studies how these early Christian texts were written and how their literary qualities shape their religious meanings.

RL-199   RL Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) An examination of an area of study not regularly included in the departmental offerings. Titles will vary. Students may take each special topics course for credit.

RL-210   Sacred Landscapes (Either Semester; Variable; 3.00 Credits; H,CTDH) This course explores the relationship between the experience of geography and religious ideology. We take various environments-mountainous, oceanic, desert, forest, plains-and try to connect the religious thoughts of their inhabitants to the geography.

RL-230   Religions of India (Either Semester; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H,I,CW,SW-GE) An introduction to religions originating in or having a major impact on contemporary India, including Hinduism, Sikhism, and Islam. We will engage with rituals, mythology, and sacred texts from each tradition. The emphasis in this class is on what makes these traditions compelling to the people who practice them. Pre- or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

RL-235   Religion and Nature (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H,I,CA,CW,WK-HT) What is the relationship between religious/ spiritual worldviews and the ways humans interact with the natural world? We will examine religious views of nature, wilderness, pollution, and climate change, as well as ways in which these worldviews have led to harm to environmental systems. Students will also spend time examining their own relationships with the natural world. Pre-Req or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109

RL-250   Women in the Bible (Variable; Variable; 4.00 Credits; CA,H,WK-HT) This course focuses on the female characters in the Bible and on its teachings about the social and religious roles specific to women. The course studies those texts in both their ancientand modern contexts, with special attention to how they interact with culture and explores what meanings those biblical passages can have for women (and men) today. Prerequisite: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109

RL-265   U.S. Religious Diversity (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; CA,H,CW,SW-US) The United States has become an increasingly religiously diverse nation, especially since the end of the Asian Exclusion Act in 1965. This course looks at the history of conflict, cooperation, and power dynamics between different religious groups in the United States, as well as how religious diversity has impacted, and been impacted by, American politics. A particular focus of the class is the intersection of the categories of race and religion. Prerequisite or corequisite: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

RL-299   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows the department to offer special topics not normally offered. Departments may offer more than one special topic. Prerequisites vary by title.

RL-301   The Afterlife (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H,CW,WK-HT) This upper-level seminar explores questions like these: What do major world religions teach about afterlife? How did the Bible's afterlife beliefs develop historically? Can the soul survive without the body? If so, what would a non-bodily life be like? What do near-death experiences prove about the afterlife? What is the meaning of life if there is (or is not) an afterlife? Pre-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109

RL-302   Atheism (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H,WK-HT) This upper-level seminar explores questions like these: What are the arguments both for and against the existence of God? What motivates atheists to live morally? What is the meaning of life for atheists? How and why do some atheists practice religion, and how does a religion function without belief in God? How does atheism affect the well-being of individuals and societies? Prerequisite: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109

RL-399   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows the department to offer special topics not normally offered. Departments may offer more than one special topic. Prerequisites vary by title.

RL-440   Yoga Studies (Variable; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; CA,H,I,CW,WK-HT) Yoga has become one of India's best-known exports, primarily in the form of physical (Hatha) Yoga. We will examine many of the numerous varieties of Yoga philosophy and explore how yoga and meditation became popular in the West. Students will learn basic meditation. Must have junior or senior class standing.

RL-450   God, Evil & the Holocaust (Either Semester; Variable; 4.00 Credits; H,CW,WK-HT) If God is so powerful and so good, why is there so much Evil in the world? This course examines this problem from Jewish, Christian, and agnostic perspectives, with special attention to the Holocaust, and studies ancient and modern attempts to confront this problem, including readings from the Bible, philosophers, theologians, Holocaust survivors, modern fiction, and contemporary films. Pre-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109, and junior or senior standing.

RL-490   Religion Internship (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 2.00-9.00 Credits; H) See " Internship " in catalog. Corequisite: RL495. Prerequisites: Jr. or Sr. Standing.

RL-495   Religion Internship Seminar (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 2.00-6.00 Credits; H) See " Internship " in catalog. Corequisite: RL490.

RL-499   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows the department to offer special topics not normally offered. Departments may offer more than one special topic. Prerequisites vary by title.

RL-TUT   Religion Teaching Assistant (Variable; Variable; 1.00-3.00 Credits; H)

Sociology and Social Work

Department Website:

https://www.juniata.edu/academics/departments/sociology/

Faculty:

Background Information:

Sociology is the systematic study of human interaction. The discipline uses both descriptive and analytical methods and it differs from other social sciences by its focus on society.  Accredited by the Council on Social Work Education, the Dorothy Baker Johnson and Raymond R. Day Social Work Program is designed primarily to prepare students for entry-level generalist social work practice. The department's offerings may be combined to meet three kinds of academic needs: the broad study of societies and their contemporary problems for the liberally-educated; a theoretical and conceptual orientation for pre-professional sociologists; and rigorous training and field experience in social work for those interested in this career or in the pursuit of graduate education in social work.

Programs of Emphasis:

Individualized Programs of Emphasis:

Secondary Emphasis:

Sample Internship/Research Experiences:

Courses:

Sociology

SO-101   Introduction to Sociology (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S,SW-US) The study of human social groups and the social processes that lead to both structural and cultural integration and differentiation primarily within contemporary American society. Pre-Req or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

SO-199   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Offered at the discretion of the department to qualified students Topic titles may vary from semester to semester and more than one may be offered per semester. Note: Students may take each ST: course for credit.

SO-203   Minority Experiences (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) An exploration of the factors that shape the experiences of minority group members in both domestic and global contexts. The social processes that functions to construct minority identity among racial, ethnic, gender, and ability groups are studied. Prerequisites: SO101 or AN151.

SO-204   American Families (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S) Examines the structure and functions of the family as a vital social institution. Particular emphasis is placed on emerging trends within the family including dual careers, non-traditional families, divorce, and conflict management. Prerequisite: SO101 or AN151.

SO-243   Death & Dying (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S,SW-ER) This course introduces and explores cross-cultural attitudes, ethical dilemmas and the existential challenges of death and dying. Topics of the course include: self-examination of death attitudes, exploration of death customs and rituals, an overview of the dying process, exploration of difficult topics surrounding death and grief and bereavement. Pre-Req or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

SO-244   Drugs and Society (Either Semester; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S) This course explores the history of substance abuse, models ofaddiction, physiological effects of commonly abused substances and treatment effectiveness. Some of the programs that will be examined include the 12-step program. Prerequisites: SO-101.

SO-245   Cross-Cultural Perspectives Family Dev (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S,WK-SI) Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Family Development: This course provides a theoretical, functional, and research-informed approach to studying family life from a cross-cultural perspective. Issues related to marital relationships, parenting styles, work-family life balance, family communication, sexuality and gender, domestic violence, family stress and coping, and aging are addressed using cross-cultural comparison, including comparisons between indigenous and non-indigenous cultures. Pre- or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

SO-260   Introduction to Criminal Justice (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Explores the nature of crime, the history of criminal justice, and the process of the modern justice system.

SO-299   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Offered at the discretion of the department to qualified students Topic titles may vary from semester to semester and more than one may be offered per semester. Note: Students may take each ST: course for credit.

SO-302   Social Deviance and Criminology (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Examines contemporary psychological and sociological theories of behavior deviation, including crime, delinquency, substance abuse and selected other categories. Typologies for classifying and studying crime are developed and evaluated. Trends in behavior deviation, including the characteristics of offenders and victims, are critically explored. Informal and formal, as well as proactive and reactive, social control systems aimed at managing behavior deviation are described and analyzed. Prerequisites: SO101 or AN151.

SO-305   Gender and Society (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S) This course is designed to explore the history and discourse related to the experiences and sociological definitions of gender roles across global and domestic contexts. Students will participate in critical analysis of the scholarship of gender roles using classical and contemporary works. The course will explore domestic and international experiences of men and women in biological, cultural, economic, environmental and political contexts. Prerequisites: SO101 or PY101.

SO-362   Juvenile Justice (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; CW,S,SW-ER) The issues, trends, and challenges facing juvenile justice professionals are explored in this course. The history and philosophy of juvenile justice, processing, detention, and diversion of juvenile offenders are topics of the course. Pre-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

SO-399   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows the department to offer special topics not normally offered. Departments may offer more than one special topic. Prerequisites vary by title.

SO-401   Sociology Senior Seminar (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Sociology Senior Seminar is the capstone course for students who have focused their academic work in the sociological discipline. The course provides an opportunity for students to apply key curricular components previously explored during their undergraduate sociology coursework. The course is a designated service learning and experiential learning course. Students will assume substantial responsibility for the exploration of materials and presentation of those materials to their student colleagues. Students will also interact with campus and community partners during the semester. The course uses a student-led seminar format, coupled with community engagement and service learning components. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

SO-492   Sociology Internship (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 2.00-9.00 Credits; S) Minimum GPA of 2.50 and good academic standing required for internship eligibility. Development of internship proposal must occur a minimum of six weeks prior to start of internship. Corequisite: SO495. Prerequisite: 2.50 GPA, Permission and Junior or Senior standing.

SO-495   Sociology Research/Seminar (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 2.00-6.00 Credits; S) Requires students to reflect on the internship experience and pursue research related to the placement. Corequisite: SO492. Prerequisite: by permission.

SO-499   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows the department to offer subjects not on the normal schedule. Prerequisites vary by title.

SO-TUT   Sociology Teaching Assistant (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) Individualized study wherein the instructor designs the course in consultation with the student and is responsible for its administration. In the Tutorial, the instructor and student work closely on a regularly scheduled basis involving discussions, demonstrations, explanations and evaluations.

Anthropology

AN-151   Introduction to Anthropology (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S,I) Dedicated to the proposition that there are many ways of being human, all of which are adaptations to particular sets of environmental and historical conditions. Trends and highlights of the human experience, both physical and cultural, are studied from a sociocultural perspective.

AN-254   Archaeology & Human Prehistory (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S,I) Through readings, lectures, films, and discussions about a variety of archaeological sites, from Alaska to Zimbabawe, students are introduced to our earliest ancestors, to the diversity of prehistoric cultures, and to the origins of Western civilization.

AN-255   Applied Archaeology (Either Semester; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; SW-LE,CTDH,H) Applied Archaeology follows a seminar format combined with active learning involving collaboration with community partners on historic preservation projects. This course introduces students to the study of the physical traces left by people in the past, emphasizing methods of identifying, documenting, curating, and analyzing historical sites and artifacts. Students study archaeological collections through an anthropological lens via laboratory and historical research techniques, including new technologies of the digital humanities. Pre- or Co-req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109.

AN-299   Anthropology Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Special topics course

AN-300   Anthropology of War & Peace (Either Semester; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S,I) A study of the incidence and nature of cooperation, competition, and conflict in human cultures. Evidence will be drawn from archaeological, ethnological and ethological data. Prerequisite: AN151 or PACS110.

AN-310   American Indians (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S) An examination of the social, economic and political lives of reservation and non-reservation American Indians set in the historical context of their minority treatment. Prerequisites; SO101 or AN151 or AN254.

AN-311   Topics in Anthropology (Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S) Occasional offerings in which students and a professor explore an area of specialized interest. Some themes include religion, gender, culture change, cultural ecology, frontiers and insider/outsider. Prerequisites: AN151 or AN254.

AN-316   North American Prehistory (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S) A survey of the archaeological evidence in North America before 1492. Students learn about the diversity of groups, ranging in size from small bands of hunter-gatherers to highly complex societies, and how they exploited various ecological niches.

AN-351   Cultures of the World (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S,I) An introduction to the variation in human cultural systems. A cultural perspective is used to examine diversity in band, tribal, chiefdom, and state level societies. Prerequisites: AN151 or AN254 or permission.

AN-353   Archaeological Fieldwork (Summer; Irregular/On Demand; 2.00-4.00 Credits; S) An introduction to the ethics, principles and techniques of archaeological field research that includes a practicum with actual excavations on both prehistoric and historic sites.

AN-355   Evolution, Medicine and Health (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S,N) This course focuses on the relationships among human ecology, population change, health and disease, social inequity, and adaptation in modern and prehistoric societies. Explores the origins of and pathways toward risk for infectious and chronic diseases, emphasizing the principles of epidemiology and the evolutionary history of both humans and pathogens. Prerequisites: AN151, and BI105 or BI190

AN-399   Special Topics (Spring; Yearly; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows the department to offer special topics not normally offered. Departments may offer more than one special topic. Prerequisites vary by title.

AN-411   History of Anthropological Thought (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S,CW) Explores the major theoretical orientations of American and European Anthropology, including: functionalism, structuralism, social evolutionism, symbolic anthropology, as well as a consideration of Marxist, feminist and indigenous critiques. A capstone integrative experience for all upper level anthropology POEs. Prerequisites: AN151 or AN234.

AN-451   Cultural Ecology (Spring; Even Years; 3.00 Credits; S) An examination of the relationships between man and his environment, particularly noting how ecological variables influence such cultural patterns as subsistence, settlement, social relationships and stress behaviors. Some consideration is given to problems of the future. Prerequisite: AN151 or AN254.

AN-452   Archaeology Lab (Either Semester; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S) Provides instruction in all of the processes involved in preservation, conservation, cataloging, illustrating and analyzing artifacts and other materials from archaeological excavation. In addition to general experience, students specialize in an analytical technique of their choice. Prerequisites: AN151 and SO353.

AN-453   Archaeology (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S) An advanced introduction to archaeological method and theory. Students use a computer-simulated excavation to develop research problems, design research strategies, and collect, analyze, and interpret data. Prerequisite: AN254 and ND.SS214.

AN-454   Ethnology (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; S,I) An introduction to cross-cultural research. Using statistical methods and data from ethnographic sources, students examine patterns of cultural continuity and discontinuity, and test hypotheses about human cultural systems. Prerequisites: AN151 & ND.SS214.

AN-490   Internship/Need Paperwork (Variable; Variable; 2.00-9.00 Credits) See catalog.

AN-495   Internship Seminar (Variable; Variable; 2.00-6.00 Credits) See catalog.

AN-499   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows department to offer topics not normally offered. Prerequisites vary by topic.

Social Work

SW-214   Integrated Research Methods & Stats I (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) An integrated course sequence applying processes of social inquiry to the assessment of historically oppressed and vulnerable populations, and of the interventions used to help those populations. This course integrates key research concepts and commonly used quantitative and qualitative methods in the social sciences, with the ability to communicate effectively about research with written and verbal skills. The course teaches students not only to conduct social science research but also to consume and utilize social science research in a critical way, including in practice as a helping professional.

SW-215   Integrtd Research Methods & Stats II (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) The second part of an integrated course sequence applying the scientific process to the fields of Social Work and Sociology, emphasizing key research concepts, commonly used quantitative and qualitative methods, and the ability to communicate effectively about research with written and verbal skills. The course teaches students not only to conduct research but also to consume and utilize research.

SW-221   The Life Cycle (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S,WK-SI) This course provides an introduction to lifespan development from conception, through birth, infancy, childhood, adolescence, and various stages of adulthood. Explores perspectives on the biological, psychological, and socio-cultural aspects of development over time. Examines human diversity as well as similarities in growth and development, utilizing theory and research. Discusses implications for prevention and intervention related to common developmental challenges and adversities. Pre-Req or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109

SW-230   Introduction to Social Work Practice (Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; S) Examines the generalist knowledge, values and skills of the social work profession. Emphasizes interviewing and communication skills, the development of a helping relationship, the strengths perspective and problem solving strategies. Prerequisites: SO101 or permission of instructor.

SW-231   Social Problems & Social Welfare (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S,WK-SI) This course explores persistent social problems including poverty, inequality, unemployment, homelessness, family violence, substance abuse, and lack of healthcare access, using historical, philosophical, and social science perspectives. The development of social policies and services as institutional responses to these problems are described and analyzed. Over the course of the term, students will review a significant body of literature related to a social problem/policy of choice, and conduct a case study with a community member who has experienced consequences of that same problem/policy. Prerequisites: FYC-101, EN-110, or EN-109.

SW-241   Children, Youth, and Family Services (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; CW,S,WK-SI) This course involves a critical analysis of child and family services, practices, and policies, while exposing students to the challenging risks and needs, traumatic and institutional experiences of high-risk youth and families, as well as sources of strength, protection, and resilience. Students will participate in analyzing and interpreting research using needs assessment data provided by the instructor, and complete a scaffolded research paper assignment to analyze a specific issue of interest.

SW-330   Social Work Practice: Individual, Family & Small Groups Laboratory (Fall; Yearly; 2.00 Credits; S,SW-LE) This concurrent laboratory for SW-331 allows students to gain further experience working in a social service agency through participation in volunteer work, which is supervised and evaluated by a human service professional within the agency. Through this work, students have an opportunity to apply the skills needed to work with vulnerable client populations, including engaging, assessing, and intervening. Co-Req: SW-331. Pre-Req: SW-230.

SW-331   Social Work Practice: Individual, Family & Small Groups (Fall; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; S) Explores the problem solving process used in social work practice with individuals, families and small groups. Interviewing and problem solving skills, family systems analysis and group process are refined in preparation for beginning practice with individuals, families, and small groups. Corequisite: SW330. Prerequisite: SW230.

SW-332   Social Work Practice: Large Groups, Organizations and Communities (Fall; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; S,CW) Focuses on the problem solving processes employed in the delivery of social work services at the agency, institutional and community level. Primary consideration is given to the systems approach to communities and the techniques, strategies, and roles utilized by the worker in assisting communities and groups to attain satisfying and developmental levels of social functioning. Prerequisite: SW230.

SW-333   Social Welfare Policies and Services (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S,CW) A conceptual study of the meanings, nature, scope, implementation and evaluation of social policy as it relates to issues of social welfare. Prerequisites: 1) SW-231; 2) SW-215 or PY-361 or ND.SS-215.

SW-399   Special Topics (Either Semester; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows the department to offer topics not on the regular course offerings. Prerequisites and corequisites may vary by title.

SW-490   Social Work: Professional Semester (Spring; Yearly; 12.00 Credits; S) Full time supervised senior capstone field experience in an approved social work agency. Students integrate the knowledge, values and skills of the social work profession with experiential learning in preparation for assuming the responsibilities of an entry-level social work professional upon graduation. Corequisite: SW495 Prerequisite: Permission.

SW-495   Professional Semester: Research Seminar (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Involves research and discussion of practice issues of importance to the generalist social worker focusing on the impact these issues have on student's own practice experience. Corequisite: SW490. Prerequisite: Permission.

SW-TUT   Social Work Teaching Assistant/Tutorial (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits)

World Languages and Cultures

Department Website:

https://www.juniata.edu/academics/departments/languages/

Faculty:

Background Information:

The study of languages and cultures has always been an integral part of the liberal arts. The globalization of markets, of international problems, and even of individual lives has made the knowledge of more than one language and culture an essential skill. By teaching students to communicate in another language and to function successfully in another culture, the Department of World Languages and Cultures helps them acquire a respect for human diversity, an awareness of the purposes and possibilities of different forms of expression, and the experience and skills necessary to pursue graduate study or a variety of careers in education, business, information technology, government, and other areas. The study of literature and culture enables students to read with insight, to think and express themselves clearly, and to judge international issues and individual behaviors with a compassionate understanding of how the human condition varies across cultures. To prepare international students for success in both academic and professional settings, the English for Academic Purposes program offers courses in English as a Second Language (ESL) at Intermediate through Advanced levels of proficiency. 

Special programs, facilities, or equipment:

Programs of Emphasis:

Individualized Programs of Emphasis

Students have designed interdisciplinary Programs of Emphasis which combine advanced study in French, German, Russian, or Spanish with disciplines such as:

Secondary Emphasis:


Specific department policy:

IC/CA Waiver:  The Interdisciplinary Colloquium and Cultural Analysis requirements will be waived for students who successfully complete a world language course beyond the 210 level in the target language and a semester or more of study abroad in the target language and culture.

AP Credit: Incoming students who have received a score of 4 or better on the Advanced Placement Exam and who enroll in an intermediate or advanced foreign-language course during their first year at Juniata College may receive up to four hours of AP credit.

 

Courses:

English as a Second Language

ESL-150   Academic Writing (Either Semester; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) The focus of this course is developing writing fluency, as well as helping students find their own writing styles. Students will explore and apply the writing process, including brainstorming, organizing, writing drafts, proofreading, and revising. In and out of class activities will include reviewing and analyzing their own writing as well as that of their classmates, organizing a portfolio, and writing three main essays exploring different academic writing forms.

ESL-151   Conversation and Discussion (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) The focus of this course is learning and strengthening the skills of conversation and discussion often used on the campuses of North American colleges and universities. Students will more fully develop awareness of different academic and social situations which will require different levels of politeness and personal attention. Activities will include a reflective listening journal, note taking, and in-class presentations/speeches.

ESL-152   Reading and Vocabulary Development (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) The focus of this course is developing specific strategies for improving reading comprehension and rate by using authentic materials: media and college-related texts. Vocabulary development will be an important component of the class, so that the students are better able to understand complex written information. Through on-campus interviews and discussion groups, students will understand the norms and expectations of the U.S. academic environment.

ESL-153   Grammar in Use-Level II (Either Semester; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) The focus of this course is improving knowledge and use of written grammar as it applies to North American colleges and universities. Through the student's writings various grammatical structures will be explicitly examined, practiced, and applied. Although the focus of the course is grammar in writing, spoken grammar will also be covered through class discussions.

ESL-170   Academic Writing II (Fall & Spring; All Years; 3.00 Credits) The focus of this course is on improving academic writing skills needed to write more structured and complex essays in English. This course will guide students from more formulaic writing to more comprehensive writing by developing skills to express arguments clearly and with strong support. Timed-writings and peer-evaluations are strong components of the course as well.

ESL-179   Academic Writing II: Lab (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit) This course, in combination with ESL 170, will develop your academic writing skills through a focus on writing process. You will focus on the stages of brainstorming, topic selection, outlining, sourcing, composing and editing. Through close interaction with the teacher and assistants, you will learn the skills to be able to write more complex and expressive essays in English.

ESL-199   Special Topics (Either Semester; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) The IEP can offer special courses based on student and program needs.

ESL-202   Advanced ESL Reading (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; SW-GE) ESL 202: Advanced ESL Reading is designed to strengthen college level reading skills and help students learn to analyze readings from multiple points of view. Novels and other texts will provide the context for us to articulate and contrast the values, beliefs, or practices of different cultures and describe global challenges and ways different cultures address them.

ESL-211   Advanced Listening and Speaking Seminar (Either Semester; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; CS,SW-GE) High-level listening and speaking skills are needed to participate in North American college classrooms. This course is linked with a 3-credit, 100-level course and students earn credits for both courses. Through group discussion, oral presentations, video and an off-campus lab with Language in Motion, students improve their language skills and gain an understanding of content. Requisites: Take a linked 100-level course (speak to instructor).

ESL-250   College Writing (Either Semester; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; CW) The focus of this course is to enable students to write proficiently and confidently at a high level equal to American college students. Students will complete four essays which represent those most frequently written by college students. They will learn specific organizational strategies and elements of style which match North American academic expectations. Multiple revisions will be complemented by conferences with the instructor, Writing Center tutors, and peer-editing.

ESL-259   College Writing: Lab (Fall & Spring; All Years; 1.00 Credit) This course will improve your academic writing skills by developing your written process. In collaboration with the teachers and assistants, you will work on essays from ESL 250 focusing on the many stages of writing, including brainstorming, outlining, sourcing, composing, editing, re-writing, and peer-review. You will learn the process to write more complex and expressive essays in English.

ESL-299   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) The IEP can offer special courses based on student and program needs.

ESL-TUT   ESL Teaching Assistant (1.00-4.00 Credits)

Chinese

CN-110   Chinese I (Fall; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H,I,SW-GE) Begins the introductory phase of acquiring a functional proficiency in modern Chinese. Special attention is paid to spoken Chinese.

CN-120   Chinese II (Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H,I,CS,SW-GE) CHINESE 120, A CONTINUATION OF 110, IS THE SECOND HALF OF A YEAR-LONG BEGINNING LEVEL COURSE IN MODERN STANDARD (MANDARIN) CHINESE. THIS COURSE IS DESIGNED FOR STUDENTS WHO HAVE COMPLETED ONE SEMESTER OF COLLEGE-LEVEL CHINESE OR EQUIVALENT. ITS GOAL IS TO LAY A GOOD FOUNDATION FOR FURTHER STUDY, AND TO STRIVE FOR AN ALL-ROUND DEVELOPMENT OF COMMINICATIVE COMPETENCE IN LISTENING, SPEAKING, READING AND WRITING IN MANDARIN CHINESE IN THE CONEXT OF CHINESE CULTURE. PREREQ: CN110 or LANGUAGE PLACEMENT RESULTS.

CN-199   Chinese Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) For 100-level special topics courses in Chinese.

CN-210   Chinese III (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; H,I,CS,SW-GE) Chinese 210 is the third part of a four-semester introductory sequence. This course is designed to further develop listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in Chinese. It will continue to train students in pronunciation and tone accuracy, to help them review and strengthen the basic syntax and grammar, build a working vocabulary around various daily situations, and further enhance their understanding of Chinese life and culture. Pre-req: CN110 and 120, or placement test results.

CN-220   Chinese IV (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; H,I,CS,SW-GE) Chinese 220 is the second part of the Intermediate Standard Mandarin Chinese course. To attend this course, successful completion of Chinese 110, 120, and 210 or equivalent are required. this course will continue to focus on oral proficiency as well as on the further development of reading, writing, and listening skills in the context of Chinese Culture. Students will attain approximately the Intermediate-low level on the ACTFL-ETS (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) proficiency scale. Prerequisites: CN110 and CN120 and CN210.

CN-299   Chinese Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) For 200-level special topics courses in Chinese.

CN-330   Advanced Chinese (Fall; Variable; 3.00 Credits; I,H,CS,SW-GE) This is a high-intermediate to advanced Chinese language conversation course that also integrates Chinese reading and writing skills. The course uses videos, audio clips and textbook readings to present different cultural, social, linguistic, and economics topics in Chinese language. Students will gain a deeper understanding of both Chinese language and modern Chinese society. Prerequisites: CN110 and CN120 and CN210 and CN220.

CN-399   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; H,I) Allows departments to offer topics not normally taught. Fees and requisites change by topic.

French

FR-110   French I (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; H,I,SW-GE) Emphasizes the four communicative skills (speaking, reading, writing, and listening) focusing on the context of everyday life.

FR-120   French II (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; H,I,CS,SW-GE) In addition to learning and practicing basic communication skills in French, students will study some of the cultural foundations and practices of the French-speaking world. Instruction is entirely in French. Pre-Req: FR-110 or equivalent.

FR-210   French III (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; H,I,CS,SW-GE) This is the third course in a the three-semester sequence of beginning and intermediate French. Students will learn and practice more advanced grammatical structures and vocabulary to communicate more spontaneously and fluently with other speakers of French. PRE-REQ: French 120 or equivalent.

FR-230   Conversation (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; H,I,CS,SW-GE) This course focuses on developing the speaking and listening skills of students of French. Students will acquire the language structures and vocabulary to interact with fluent or native speakers of French on a variety of topics without strain for either party. PRE-REQ: FR 210 or equivalent.

FR-260   French Civilization and Culture (Either Semester; Variable; 3.00 Credits; H,I,CS,SW-GE) An overview of the French culture and civilization in language, art, literature, history, and ideas. Prerequisites: FR210 or equivalent.

FR-270   Francophone Civilization and Culture II (Either Semester; Odd Years; 3.00 Credits; H,I,CS,SW-GE) An in-depth introduction to the history and influence of French culture outside Europe. Students will gain a general knowledge of contemporary Francophone cultures that exist throughout the world. Prerequisite: FR210 or equivalent.

FR-279   Sexuality and Literature (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; I,H,CA,SW-ER) This course uses literary texts as a critical lens to analyze and critique sexual ethics in different cultural and historical contexts or situations. The course is conducted as a seminar with entertaining, thought-provoking reading assignments and lively classroom discussions. No knowledge of the French language is required to enroll in this course.

FR-299   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-3.00 Credits) Allows departments to offer subjects not normally taught. Prerequisites and fees vary by topic.

FR-326   French Cinema (Either Semester; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; F,I,H,CW,CA) An overview of the history of French Cinema and various schools of film analysis. Participants in this course view and analyze major examples of French cinema from its origins to today. Discussions are in English. Papers may be written in English or French.

FR-331   The Craft of Translation (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; H,I,CW,SW-GE) This course introduces high-intermediate and advanced students of French to the formal technics and art of written translation. Students must have completed two 200 level courses taught in French or have instructor permission prior to enrollement.

FR-345   Women in French Culture (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; CA,I,H,CW) An introduction to the major currents of contemporary French feminism. All readings are in the translation and discussions are in English.

FR-399   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Provides courses not covered by the regular offerings. These are developed to meet the needs of students of advanced standing and included themes in Medieval & Renaissance Literature and French Women Writers.

FR-450   Research Project in French (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; H,I,CS) An independent research project or thesis which will be designed by the student with the assistance of the instructor. Throughout the semester, the student will research his/her topic and submit a final paper or thesis to be defended at the end of the semester Prerequisites: three 300 level French courses and permission, or a year of study abroad and permission.

FR-490   French Internship (Variable; Variable; 2.00-9.00 Credits) See catalog. Corequisite: FR495

FR-495   FR Internship Seminar (Variable; Variable; 2.00-6.00 Credits) See catalog. Corequisite: FR490

FR-TUT   French Teaching Assistant (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits; H,I) See catalog for description.

German

GR-108B   Vienna Intensive German (Summer; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; I,H,SW-GE) This BCA-operated course provides four weeks of intensive language instruction by native speakers at the Internationale Kulturinstitut Wien (iki) language school in Vienna, Austria. No prior knowledge of German is required. All levels of German are available, from beginning to advanced. Corequisite: Participants must concurrently enroll in GR208A, " Vienna: Crossroads of Europe, " a cultural studies course taught in German and English.

GR-109   Intensive German Program I (Summer; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; I,H,SW-GE) This program provides four or five weeks of intensive language instruction by native speakers at the KAPITO language school in Muenster, Germany. All levels of German are available, from beginning to advanced. In addition, all students participate in three to four extra-curricular activities with a cultural focus per week. Note: A special course fee is applied.

GR-199   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows department to offer courses not normally taught. Prerequisites and fees vary by course.

GR-199A   German Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows department to offer courses not normally taught. Prerequisites and fees vary by course.

GR-199B   German Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows department to offer courses not normally taught. Prerequisites and fees vary by course.

GR-208A   Vienna: Crossroads of Europe (Summer; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; I,H,SW-GE) This course will introduce students to the history and culture of Vienna, Austria. It focuses on the city as a geographical, political, cultural, and artistic crossroads at the heart of Europe. The course will help students understand how Vienna has been and remains a perpetually emerging and evolving modernity in politics, culture and the arts since the late 19th century. Corequisite: Participants must concurrently enroll in either GR108B, GR208B, or GR308B (based on their German proficiency level).

GR-208B   Vienna Intensive German (Summer; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; I,H,SW-GE) This BCA-operated course provides four weeks of intensive language instruction by native speakers at the Internationale Kulturinstitut Wien (iki) language school in Vienna, Austria. No prior knowledge of German is required. All levels of German are available, from beginning to advanced. Corequisite: Participants must concurrently enroll in GR208A, " Vienna: Crossroads of Europe, " a cultural studies course taught in German and English.

GR-209   Intensive German Program II (Summer; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; I,H,SW-GE) This program provides four or five weeks of intensive language instruction by native speakers at the KAPITO language school in Munster, Germany. All levels of German are available, from beginning to advanced. In addition, all students participate in three to four extra-curricular activities with a cultural focus per week. Note: A special course fee is applied.

GR-210   German III (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; H,I,CS,SW-GE) German III is the third part of the four-semester introductory sequence. Its primary goals are to enable students to continue building their proficiency and attain a broader understanding of German culture. Emphasis is placed on the use of the target language in the classroom and the study of culturally authentic materials. Students will achieve greater accuracy with basic language structures. Pre-req: GR120, placement test, or program head's permission. This course is part of the Global Engagement element of the General Education Curriculum, " 3. Language Study " : Complete at least a 200-level world language course in the target language if continuing previous language study.

GR-220   German IV (Fall & Spring; All Years; 3.00 Credits; CS,H,I,SW-GE) Final part of the four-semester introductory sequence. German IV will expand upon students' existing listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills and further their understanding of contemporary Germanic cultures. Pre-requisite: GR 210, department placement test, or program head's permission. This course is part of the Global Engagement element of the General Education Curriculum, " 3. Language Study " : Complete at least a 200-level world language course in the target language if continuing previous language study.

GR-232   German Conversation & Composition (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; I,H,CW,SW-GE) German Composition & Conversation is an intermediate-level course that will expand upon students' existing listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills and further their understanding of contemporary culture of German-speaking countries. Building on skills and vocabulary previously acquired, this course focuses on growing vocabulary, exploring communicative strategies, and increasing oral proficiency via active participation and self-expression in and outside of class. Pre-requisites: GR 210, departmental placement test, or program head's permission.

GR-299   Special Topics (Either Semester; Variable; 3.00-4.00 Credits) Provides courses not covered by the regular offerings. These are developed to meet the needs of students of advanced standing.

GR-299A   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows department to offer topics not normally taught. Fees and prerequisites vary by section.

GR-299B   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows departments to offer courses not normally taught. Fees and prerequisites vary by title.

GR-308B   Vienna Intensive German (Summer; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; I,H,SW-GE) This BCA-operated course provides four weeks of intensive language instruction by native speakers at the Internationale Kulturinstitut Wien (iki) language school in Vienna, Austria. No prior knowledge of German is required. All levels of German are available, from beginning to advanced. Corequisite: Participants must concurrently enroll in GR208A, " Vienna: Crossroads of Europe, " a cultural studies course taught in German and English.

GR-309   Intensive German Program III (Summer; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; I,H,SW-GE) This program provides four or five weeks of intensive language instruction by native speakers at the KAPITO language school in Muenster, Germany. All levels of German are available, from beginning to advanced. In addition, all students participate in three to four extra-curricular activities with a cultural focus per week. Note: A special course fee is applied.

GR-320   Early 20th Century German Literature (Either Semester; Variable; 3.00 Credits; H,I,CS,SW-GE) Examines readings from the works of such authors as B. Brecht, H. Hesse, H. von Hofmannsthal, F. Kafka, T. Mann, F. Wedekind and F. Werfel. Discussion focuses on the complex problems and issues facing modern man in an ever changing world.

GR-399   Special Topics (Either Semester; Variable; 3.00 Credits) Provides courses not covered by the regular offerings. These are developed to meet the needs of students of advanced standing.

GR-399A   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows department to offer topics not normally taught. Fees and prerequisites vary by section.

GR-399B   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows departments to offer topics not normally taught. Fees and prerequisites vary by title.

GR-490   Internship-Need Paperwork (Variable; Variable; 2.00-9.00 Credits) See Catalog.

GR-495   Internship Seminar (Variable; Variable; 2.00-9.00 Credits) See catalog.

Russian

RU-199   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Provides individualized instruction in topics not covered by the regular offerings. These are developed to meet the needs of students.

RU-299   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Provides individualized instruction in topics not covered by the regular offerings. These are developed to meet the needs of students.

RU-399   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Provides individualized instruction in topics not covered by the regular offerings. These are developed to meet the needs of students.

Spanish

SP-110   Spanish I (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H,I,SW-GE) Emphasizes fundamentals of grammar, pronunciation, and language production. The development of skills in oral comprehension, speaking, writing and reading are stressed. Note: Students receive H or I credit provided that they have not taken more than two years of the language at the secondary school level.

SP-110E   Spanish I Summer (Summer; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) This immersion course is offered for high school students (ages 16-18) in Granada, Spain, in conjunction with Global Works summer service programs. Students achieve a proficiency level in Spanish comparable to Spanish I (SP110).

SP-120   Spanish II (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; H,I,CS,SW-GE) Spanish 120 is the second part of a three-semester introductory sequence. Its primary goals are to enable students to build their proficiency and attain a broader understanding of Hispanic cultures. Emphasis is placed on the use of the target language in the classroom and the study of culturally authentic materials. Students will achieve greater accuracy with basic language structures. Pre-req: SP110 or placement test.

SP-120E   Spanish II Summer (Summer; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) This immersion course is offered for high school students (ages 16-18) in Granada, Spain, in conjunction with Global Works summer service programs. Students achieve a proficiency level in Spanish comparable to Spanish II (SP120).

SP-125   Sp.Immersion I (Orizaba) (Summer; Variable; 3.00 Credits; H,I,SW-GE) This course is part of a 4-week summer intensive language program in Orizaba (Mexico) and is the continued study of the fundamentals of Spanish grammar, pronunciation, and language production, with particular focus on listening comprehension and speaking. Prerequisites: SP-120.

SP-199   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows the department to offer special topics not normally offered. Departments may offer more than one special topic. Prerequisites vary by title.

SP-210   Spanish III (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; H,I,CS,SW-GE) Spanish 210 is the third part of a three-semester introductory sequence. Its primary goals are to enable students to build their proficiency and attain a broader understanding of Hispanic cultures. Emphasis is on the use of the target language and the study of culturally authentic materials. Students will achieve greater accuracy with basic language structures. Pre-req: SP-120 or placement results.

SP-215   Mexican Culture (Summer; Variable; 1.00 Credit; H,I,SW-GE) This course, which is part of a 4-week summer intensive language program in Orizaba (Mexico), will introduce students to the origin, antecedents, and development of present-day Mexico and will expose them to the diversity of its inhabitants and of their cultural practices and production. Prerequisite: SP-120. Corequisite: SP-125, SP-225 or SP-325.

SP-225   Sp.Immersion II (Orizaba) (Summer; Variable; 3.00 Credits; H,I,SW-GE) An intermediate Spanish language course, which is part of a 4-week summer intensive language program in Orizaba (Mexico), that reviews the fundamentals of Spanish grammar, pronunciation, and language production, while providing intensive practice that will enable students to achieve mastery of these basic linguistic elements and to further develop their language proficiency. Special emphasis is placed on listening comprehension and speaking. Prerequisite: SP-210.

SP-230   Spanish Conversation & Composition (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; H,I,CW,CS,SW-GE) SP230 focuses on continued learning of Spanish through the practice of speaking and writing. Students discuss short films, readings, and topics of interest from the Hispanic world. Through practice in and outside of class and study of grammatical structures and vocabulary, students will improve their reading and listening comprehension and their speaking and writing competence. Prerequisite: SP210 or placement test results.

SP-235   Intensive Spanish Grammar (Fall; Variable; 3.00 Credits; H,I) This course serves to reinforce the fundamental grammar that students have studied previously and to delve more deeply into certain topics that often prove to be challenging for native English speakers of Spanish. Topics typically of this course include; identifying the building blocks of sentences; identifying verb classes and studying how that information determines the way we construct sentences; analyzing the Spanish pronominal system including, subject and object clitic pronouns; reviewing and expanding upon the use of subordinate clauses introduced in SP210. Prerequisites: SP210.

SP-245   Spanish Phonetics & Phonology (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; H,I,CS,SW-GE) This course serves as an introduction to the phonetics and phonology of Spanish. The goals of the course include providing students with a theoretical and practical understanding of the system of Spanish sounds, including dialectal variations, as well as strengthening students' Spanish speech in the direction of more native like pronunciation. Prerequisite: SP210.

SP-250   Introduction to Hispanic Literature (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; H,I,CS,SW-GE) Emphasizes the development of skill in reading Spanish and in literary analysis of selected stories, plays, poems, and essays from Spain and Latin America. Prerequisite: SP210.

SP-255   Contemporary Hispanic Short Fiction (Fall; Variable; 3.00 Credits; H,I,CS,SW-GE) An intensive introduction to reading and analyzing twentieth-century Spanish and Spanish American short narrative. Study of the literary tests enables students to develop a better understanding of and appreciation for Hispanic cultures while continuing to build their Spanish language proficiency. Prerequisite: SP210.

SP-257   Hispanic Pop Culture in Poetry (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; I,H,SW-GE) Students will explore poetic expression in popular culture music genres, including the corrido, tango, nueva cancion, and reggaeton, as well as works of iconic poets. They will reflect critically on the practice of categorizing art according to dichotomies such high and low-brow, poetic or vulgar, crap or canon. Pre-reqs: SP-230 or equivalent.

SP-260   Spanish Civilization (Either Semester; Variable; 3.00 Credits; CS,H,I,SW-GE) An introduction to the many facets of Spanish civilization: art, music, history, literature, philosophy and everyday life. Prerequisite: SP210.

SP-265   Contemporary Spain (Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; H,I,CS,SW-GE) An intensive introduction to twentieth and twenty- first century Spain. Topics to be studied include: Spain's peaceful transition from dictatorship to democracy, economic development, and social change. Spain's role in the European Union, mass and elite cultural movements and the challenges facing Spain's younger generation. Prerequisites: SP210.

SP-271   Enrichmnt After-School for Youth-Spanish (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; SW-LE) Through this Local Engagement course, Juniata students will partner with the Huntingdon Area School District to offer language and culture classes to elementary and middle school students. They will design and deliver after-school course content in a dynamic, fun, after-school program designed to introduce students in grades 3-6 to Spanish and the cultures of Spain and Latin America. The course introduces students to best practices in local engagement, our local community, and the opportunities presented by our community partners. During seven weeks of the class, Juniata Students will teach the twice-a-week lessons at the nearby Standing Stone Elementary School. Must have clearances.

SP-272   Spanish for the Healthcare Professions (Variable; Variable; 4.00 Credits; I,SW-GE) This is a course for students who are interested in further developing their Spanish for practice in a healthcare setting. In the course, students will learn colloquial and formal medical vocabulary. They will review intermediate-level grammatical structures and practice how to properly apply these in a healthcare setting. Videos and interviews with Spanish speakers, a Mexican telenovela, and simulated medical situations are just some of the materials used in this intensive course. Students entering the course should have intermediate-level Spanish. It is recommended that they have completed two previous 200-level Spanish courses.

SP-275   Art and Activism in Latin America (Fall; Variable; 3.00 Credits; I,H,F,CS,SW-GE) Studies art --literature, film, music, plastic arts, etc.--that denounces social injustice and seeks to trigger fundamental reforms in Latin American societies. Known as arte comprometido or committed art in Latin America, selected violence, economic exploitation, racism, and machismo. The course is conducted in Spanish. Prerequisites: SP210 or by permission of the instructor.

SP-285   Introduction to Latin America (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; H,I,CS,SW-GE) This course offers students an overview of Latin American cultures through the study of their history, geography, literature, and art from the pre-Columbian period to the present. The course is conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: SP-210.

SP-299   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Allows the department to offer special topics not normally offered. Departments may offer more than one special topic. Prerequisites vary by title.

SP-300   Myth and Magic Realism (Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; CA,I,H,SW-GE) Explores the richness and diversity of Hispanic cultures through the study of texts that range from pre-Columbian myths to recent Latin American films. Emphasis will be placed on the analysis of the mytho-magical elements which are used to represent and often times critique aspects of various socio-cultural realities. The course is taught in English, and all course materials will be available in English. Prerequisites: Sophomore, Junior, or Senior standing.

SP-301   Voice for Voiceless-LA Testimonial Narr (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; CA,I,H,WK-HT) The testimonial genre developed in Latin America during the 1960s to give voice to the voiceless and bear witness to the world of the marginalized and oppressed. A representative sample of testimonial narratives will be read to examine topics such as the testimonial pact established with readers, social realities represented, processes of textual production, and narrative forms incorporated. Text will be read in English translation and the class will be conducted in English. Prereq: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109. (Previous course title: Latin American Testimonio)

SP-305   Advanced Spanish Conversation & Comp (YYearly; 3.00 Credits; I,CW,CS,SW-GE) This course is designed to give students opportunities to develop and practice their Spanish at the intermediate-high and advanced levels of the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines available at www.actfl.org. At the advanced level, speakers can: (a) narrate and describe in all major time frames (present, past and future), (b) handle a situation with a complication, (c) use connective devices and a variety of subordinate clauses, (d) use circumlocution, and (e) address topics of personal and general interest. At the advanced level, one may also demonstrate conceptual awareness or even partial control of superior level functions from the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines (e.g., support opinion, hypothesize, discuss topics concretely and abstractly, and handle a linguistically unfamiliar situation). Prerequisite: SP 230.

SP-306   Ecuador: Language, Culture, and Justice (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; SW-GE) This intensive three-week orientation course offered in Ecuador prior to an academic semester of study abroad has two distinct components: 1) A survey of Ecuadorian history, culture, and society and how those relate to issues of conflict and social justice. 2) General Spanish classes that include grammar, writing, conversation, and cultural topics. Instructor permission is required.

SP-325   Spanish Immersion III (Summer; Variable; 3.00 Credits; H,I,SW-GE) A second intermediate Spanish language course, which is part of a 4-week summer intensive language program in Orizaba (Mexico), that reviews the fundamentals of Spanish grammar, pronunciation, and language production, exploring the subtleties of features such as preterit-imperfect aspect and the subjunctive mood. Intensive immersion practice will enable students to achieve greater mastery of these elements and to further develop their language proficiency. Prerequisite: SP-230 or SP-235 or SP-245 or SP-250 or SP-255 or SP-260 SP-265 or SP-275 or SP-285.

SP-345   Spanish Phonetics & Phonology (Fall; Variable; 3.00 Credits; H,I,CS,SW-GE) This course serves as an introduction to the phonetics and phonology of Spanish. The goals of the course include providing students with a theoretical and practical understanding of the system of Spanish sounds, including dialectal variations, as well as strengthening students' Spanish speech in the direction of more native like pronunciation. Prerequisite: Study abroad experience or permission of the instructor.

SP-355   Contemporary Hispanic Short Fiction (Either Semester; Variable; 3.00 Credits; H,I,CS,SW-GE) Note: Meets with SP255. Additional work is assigned. Prerequisites: SP250 or equivalent and study abroad experience or approval of the instructor.

SP-357   Hispanic Pop Culture in Poetry (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; I,H,SW-GE) Students will explore poetic expression in popular culture music genres, including the corrido, tango, nueva cancion, and reggaeton, as well as works of iconic poets. They will reflect critically on the practice of categorizing art according to dichotomies such high and low-brow, poetic or vulgar, crap or canon. Pre-reqs: Two 200-level Spanish courses.

SP-365   Contemporary Spain (Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; H,I,CS,SW-GE) Note: Meets with SP265. Additional work is assigned. Prerequisites: SP250 or SP255 or or SP260 or approval of the instructor.

SP-375   Art and Activism in Latin America (Fall; Variable; 3.00 Credits; I,H,F,CS,SW-GE) Studies art --literature, film, music, plastic arts, etc.--that denounces social injustice and seeks to trigger fundamental reforms in Latin American societies. Known as arte comprometido or committed art in Latin America, selected artistic texts treat topics such as political violence, economic exploitation, racism, and machismo. The course is conducted in Spanish. Prerequisites: SP250 or SP255 or by permission of the instructor.

SP-385   Intro to Latin America (Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; I,H,CS,SW-GE) This course focuses on the historical, political, intellectual, artistic, and social aspects of Latin America in order to familiarize students with the main trends in the development of the region. After a review of major historical events, students will explore trends and differences among regions of Latin America. The study focuses on textual readings, but also examines some representative examples of cultural production in the fields of art, literature, music and film. Prerequisite: SP230 or equivalent. Students should not take this course if they already took SP285.

SP-399   Special Topics (Variable; Variable; 1.00-4.00 Credits) Provides courses not covered by the regular offerings. These are developed to meet the needs of students of advanced standing.

SP-400   Contemporary Spanish American Novel (Fall; Variable; 3.00 Credits; H,I,CW,CS,SW-GE) Students continue to develop advanced Spanish language and Hispanic cultural proficiency as well as critical thinking skills through the study of contemporary Spanish American novels. Prerequisite: SP250 or SP255 or permission of the instructor.

SP-401   Gender Fiction in Hispanic Literature (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; I,H,CW,SW-GE) This course, formerly titled Women in Hispanic Fiction, examines gender constructs in works by Latin American and Spanish authors. Among the topics that will be examined are the construction of gender and identity roles, historical spheres of participation for men and women, and the changing definition of such identity markers and roles. The course will focus on a broad historical range of literary works, examining how gender identities are presented in these works through their intersectionality with sexuality, class, race, age, and politics. In addition to the primary texts, students read critical essays on gender and discuss films and podcasts that develop topics parallel to those in the texts. Prerequisites: SP-250 or SP-255.(Previous Course Title: Women in Hispanic Fiction)

SP-404   Hispanic Metafiction (Alternate Years; Irregular/On Demand; 3.00 Credits; I,H,SW-GE) Metafiction is fiction that, rather than transparent, is opaque. In the metafictional moment, the reader looks at rather than through the fictional illusion. As Patricia Waugh writes in Metafiction: The Theory and Practice of Self-Conscious Fiction, Metafictional novels tend to be constructed on the principle of a fundamental and sustained opposition: the construction of a fictional illusion (as in traditional realism) and the laying bare of that illusion. In this course, students engage with the theory of metafiction and study examples from Hispanic fiction, which include works by Allende, Borges, Cortazar, Cervantes, and Garcia Marquez. Prerequsite: SP210 or permission.

SP-405   Cont. Spanish Novel (Either Semester; Variable; 3.00 Credits; H,I,CS,CW,SW-GE) Students continue to develop advanced Spanish language and Hispanic cultural proficiency as well as critical thinking skills through study of contemporary Spanish novels. Prerequisites: SP250 or SP255 or approval of the instructor.

SP-420   Generation of 1898 (Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; H,I,CS,SW-GE) In this course. students analyze selected essays, fiction, drama, and poetry of this key group of writers who accomplish a major renovation of Spanish thought and literary forms during the early decades of the twentieth century. Prerequisite: SP250 or SP255 or permission of the instructor.

SP-430   Advanced Spanish Grammar (Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; H,I,CS,SW-GE) This course serves to help advanced students gain a better understanding of the meaning of certain grammatical constructions in Spanish by systematically observing and analyzing their use in a variety of communicative contexts. Prerequisite: SP235.

World Languages

WL-201   Language in Motion (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; H,I,CS,SW-LE) In this course, international students, study-abroad returnees, students with other international experiences, heritage speakers, and/or upper-level language students expand their knowledge of language and culture, process their own intercultural and language-learning experiences, and enrich local school classrooms. In addition to learning about teaching language and culture and the school context, students develop individual projects for presentation in school classrooms.

WL-202   Language in Motion (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; H,I,CS) See WL201 Prerequisites: WL201. The course provides service-learning opportunities for international students, study-abroad returnees, heritage speakers, and upper-level language students to expand their knowledge of language and culture and to enrich local public school classrooms. After meeting with teachers and attending a Special Topics workshop, students will conference with the instructor and host teachers to develop individual projects for presentation in school classrooms. The course is graded pass-fail. Section 02. The course provides service-learning opportunities for international students, study-abroad returnees, heritage speakers, and upper-level language students to expand their knowledge of language and culture and to enrich local public school classrooms. After meeting with teachers and attending a Special Topics workshop, students will conference with the instructor and host teachers to develop individual projects for presentation in school classrooms. Students receive letter grades. Prerequisite: Permission.

WL-203   Language in Motion (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; H,I,CS) See WL201. Prerequisites: WL201 and WL202. The course provides opportunities for international students, study-abroad returnees, heritage speakers, and upper-level language students to expand their knowledge of language and culture and to enrich local public school classrooms. After meeting with teachers, students will conference with the instructor and two host teachers to develop individual projects for presentation in school classrooms. The course is graded pass-fail. Section 02. The course provides opportunities for international students, study-abroad returnees, heritage speakers, and upper-level language students to expand their knowledge of language and culture and to enrich local public school classrooms. After meeting with teachers, students will conference with the instructor and two host teachers to develop individual projects for presentation in school classrooms. Students receive letter grades. Prerequisite: Permission.

WL-204   Language in Motion (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; H,I,CS) See WL201. The pass-fail course provides opportunities for international students, study-abroad returnees, heritage speakers, and upper-level language students to expand their knowledge of language and culture and to enrich local public school classrooms. After meeting with teachers, students will conference with the instructor and the selected host teacher to develop individual projects for presentation in school classrooms. The course is graded pass-fail. Section 02. The course provides opportunities for international students, study-abroad returnees, heritage speakers, and upper-level language students to expand their knowledge of language and culture and to enrich local public school classrooms. After meeting with teachers, students will conference with the instructor and the selected host teacher to develop individual projects for presentation in school classrooms. Students receive letter grades. Prerequisites: WL201 and WL202 and WL203.

WL-303   Sociolinguistics (Spring; Even Years; 3.00 Credits; CA,H,I) This undergraduate course is meant to encourage you to reflect on how language functions in society. We will consider a subset of topics relevant to sociolinguistics,among them dialect variation (e.g., regional, social, ethnic); language ideology and language prejudice; and linguistic debates in education. We will consider linguistic communities across the United States. Prerequisite: EN110 or EN109 and Junior or Senior standing.

WL-398   Methods for Foreign Language Education (Fall; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; S,CS) This course is for students interested in teaching foreign languages or English as a foreign language or second language (ESL). This course provides a thorough introduction to contemporary theories and methods of language pedagogy. Students seeking K-12 certification in foreign languages may take this course instead of ED420 after studying abroad. It may also be taken by those students who have an interest in teaching English abroad. International students who are here a semester or a year should also consider taking this course. Prerequisites: ED110 and ED111 and ED130 and ED240.

WL-490   World Language Internship (Variable; Variable; 2.00-9.00 Credits; H,I) See " Internships " in the catalog.

WL-495   Internship Seminar (Variable; Variable; 2.00-6.00 Credits; H,I) See " Internships " in catalog.


Academic Calendar

Download printable PDF of this calendar.

Fall 2018 Semester

August 2018
DateDayEvent
23 Thursday First day of the 18/FA semester
31 Friday Last day to add or drop an 18/FA course
September 2018
DateDayEvent
13 Thursday Student deadline to submit work to Instructor for Incomplete 18/SP and 18/SU courses
21 Friday Faculty deadline to submit final grades for Incomplete 18/SP and 18/SU courses
28-30 Friday-Sunday Homecoming and Family Weekend
October 2018
DateDayEvent
8 - 28 Monday - Sunday Midterm notices are submitted to QUEST
11-14 Thursday - Sunday Fall Break
15 Monday Advising for 18/FA new students begins
22 Monday Registration for 19/SP opens for graduate students and 18/FA new students
29 Monday Registration for 19/SP opens for seniors, juniors and sophomores
November 2018
DateDayEvent
2 Friday Registration closes for all class levels
21 - 25 Wednesday - Sunday Thanksgiving Break
December 2018
DateDayEvent
7 Friday Last day of classes
7 Friday Last day to withdraw from a 18/FA course (except if specified otherwise on syllabus)
10 - 14 Monday - Friday Final examinations
14 Friday Last day of the 18/FA semester

Spring 2019 Semester

January 2019
DateDayEvent
21 Monday First day of the 19/SP semester
29 Tuesday Last day to add or drop a 19/SP course
30 Wednesday Last day to add or drop a 19/SP course. *Drop/Add was extended by one day in response to the college closure due to snow on 1/21/19.
February 2019
DateDayEvent
4 Monday Student deadline to submit work to Instructor for Incomplete 18/FA course
8 Friday Faculty deadline to submit grades for Incomplete 18/FA courses
March 2019
DateDayEvent
8 - 31 Friday - Sunday Midterm notices are submitted to QUEST
9 - 17 Saturday - Sunday Spring Break
18 Monday Advising for 19/FA registration begins
25 Monday Registration for 19/FA opens for seniors, juniors and graduate students
27 Wednesday Registration for 19/FA opens for sophomores
29 Friday Sophomore POEs are due in Registrar's Office.
April 2019
DateDayEvent
1 Monday Registration for 19/FA opens for freshmen
5 Friday Registration closes for all class levels
17 Wednesday Founders Day
25 Thursday Liberal Arts Symposium
May 2019
DateDayEvent
7 Tuesday Last day of classes
7 Tuesday Last day to withdraw from an 19/SP course (except if specified otherwise on syllabus)
7 Tuesday Spring Awards Convocation
8 Wednesday Reading Day
9 - 15 Thursday - Wednesday Final examinations
15 Wednesday Last day of the 19/SP semester
17 Friday Senior Baccalaureate
18 Saturday Juniata College's 141st Commencement Ceremony

 

OFFICIAL = Approved by SLT on 8/28/17; updated on 1/24/19

 

 

Directories

Board of Trustees

Date in parentheses is that of appointment to the board.

Officers

White, Mary M., '73, Chair

Glaeser, Carl D. ’77, Vice Chair

Habecker, Gail M., '76,  Treasurer

Wiser, Karla, '97, Assistant Treasurer

Moyer, Bruce L., '74, Secretary

Sheffield, Bethany D., Assistant Secretary

Members

Troha, James A., B.A., M.A., Ph.D. – Ex-Officio (2013)

Terms Expire 2022

Batchelor, John L. '69, B.A., M.A., Ed.D., Retired, Director of Field Placements, Gwynedd Mercy University, Rehoboth Beach, DE (2019)

Donahue, Jayne K.,
'75, B.S., Retired, Executive Vice President and General Auditor, State Street Corporation, Southborough, MA (2013)

Habecker, Gail M. ’76, B.A., E.B. A.C., Director of Research, StoneRidge PMG Advisors, LLC, Conshohocken, PA (2003-2006) (2007)

Hayes, William P. B.A., President & CEO, Kish Bankcorp, Inc., State College, PA (2004)

Hess, Steven J. '91, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Senior Director of Research & Development, The Hershey Company, Hershey, PA (2019)

Hevrony, Nathan B.S., Principal & Managing Partner, HIG Equity, New York, NY (2013)

Holsinger, Steven J. ’76, B.A., J.D., General Counsel and Secretary, A.S.K. Foods, Inc., Palmyra, PA (1999-00) (2001)

Klag, Michael J. '74, B.S., M.D., M.P.H. Dean Emeritus, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (2019)

Pletcher, Carol A.
’66, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., President, Pletcher Inc., Solana Beach, CA (2016)

Statton, Timothy D. ’72, B.S., Retired, Executive Vice President and Director Bechtel Group, Inc, President, Bechtel Telecommunications Global Business Unit, Member of Bechtel Corporate Board, Sonoma, CA (1998)

Valko, George P. B.S., M.D., Vice Chair, Department of Family & Community Medicine, Thomas Jefferson University, Collegeville, PA (2013)


Terms Expire 2023

Beachley, David C. ’77, B.S., President, Beachley Furniture Company, Inc., Hagerstown, MD (2005-2007, 2008)

Close, Nicole C. ’92, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., President and Principal Biostatistician, Empiristat, Mount Airy, MD (2020)

Endres, Richard J., B.S., Owner & President, E.B. Endres Inc., Huntingdon, PA (2017)

Glaeser, Carl D. ’77, B.S., Managing Partner, Palladian Capital Partners, New York, NY (2005)

Hadley, Joy L. ’84,  B.S., M.P.A., Senior Executive Service Member, Federal Housing Administration, Alexandria, VA (2020)

Jones, Elaine V. ’76, B.S., Ph.D., Retired, Vice President, Pfizer Corporation, Wayne, PA (2014)

Kochel, Randy L. ’79, B.S., M.D., Managing Physician, Family Medicine County Line, Lancaster, PA (2020)

Mason, Fred C. ’73, B.S., M.B.A., Retired Director, Product Source Planning, Caterpillar, Inc., Greenland, New Hampshire (2008)

Moyer, Bruce L. ’74, B.A., J.D., President, Government/Legal Affairs, Moyer Group, Takoma Park, MD (2011)

Paulhamus, Richard E. ’70, B.S. M.S., Consultant, Bonita Springs, FL (1997-2000, 2002)

Shah, Parisha P. ’01, B.S., Ph.D., Senior Research Investigator, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (2020)

Siedzikowski, Henry F. ’75, B.A., J.D., President, Attorney, Elliott Greenleaf & Siedzikowski, Blue Bell, PA (2011)

White, Mary M. ’73, B.S., M.S., Vice President/Resource Management, HCA/HealthONE, Englewood, CO (1999)

Terms Expire 2024

Deike, Randall C. '88, B.S., M.S., Ph.D, Retired, Senior Vice President for Enrollment Management and Student Success, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA (2018)

Fahey, David J.
’81, Principal and Managing Director, Avison Young, Wayne, PA (2015)

Jensen, Eric C. ’77, B.S., Ph.D., Retired, Senior Research Fellow, Eli Lilly & Company, Indianapolis, IN (2009)

Johnson, Michael A. L. ’07, B.S., M.D., Neurologist/Physician, Colorado Neurodiagnostics, Littleton, CO (2021) 

Monger Gray, Jodie E. '88, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Retired President & Owner, Customer Relationship Metrics, Stevensville, MD (2002)

Ostrowski, Colleen E. ’95, B.S., M.B.A., Senior Vice President & Treasurer, Visa, Foster City, CA (2021)

Sunderland, Daniel K. '88, B.S., President, Sun Motor Cars, Inc., Mechanicsburg, PA (2018)

Thompson, Christopher J. '87, B.S., Retired, Independent Consultant, Media, PA (2021)

Van Horn, Carol L. '79, B.S., J.D., Senior Judge, Chambersburg, PA (2021)

Wise, Charles W. III,
A.B., M.B.A., Retired Vice President, Human Resources, PPG Industries, Pittsburgh, PA (2000)

Wulczyn, Friedhelm '75, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Senior Research Fellow, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (2018)

Faculty

Full-Time Faculty

The date in parentheses is that of first appointment to Juniata faculty.

Ames, William M., Associate Professor of Chemistry (2013). B.A., Macalester College, 2004; Ph.D., The University of Iowa, 2009.

Andrew, Bradley B., Professor of Economics (2001). B.S., Framingham State College, 1989; M.A., Ph. D., University of Connecticut, 1992, 2002.

Baran, Peter, Professor of Chemistry (2004). B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Slovak Technical University, 1985, 1986, 1992.

Barlow, J. Jackson, Charles A. Dana Professor of Politics (1991). Junior Faculty Award (1995); Beachley Distinguished Academic Service Award (2006). B.A., Carleton College, 1976; M.A., Ph.D., Claremont Graduate School, 1981, 1984.

Baughman, Kathy R., Swigart Associates Associate Professor of Business (2009). The Henry H. ‘57 and Joan R. Gibbel Award for Teaching Excellence, 2015, B.S., The Pennsylvania State University, 1991; M.B.A., Saint Francis University, 2009.

Beaky, Matthew M., Associate Professor of Physics (2011). B.S., Worcester Polytechnic Institute (1989). M.S., Ph.D.,The Ohio State University, 1992, 1996.

Bellwoar, Hannah, Associate Professor of English (2011). B.A.Temple University, 2000; M.S., Ph.D., University of Illinois, 2004, 2011.

Bennett, Randy L., Professor of Biology (2000). B.A., Western Maryland College (1985). Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1993.

Benson, Bethany, Professor of Art (2007). Henry H.’57 and Joan R. Gibbel Award for Teaching Excellence (2013). B.F.A., University of Massachusetts, 2000; M.F.A., Southern Illinois University, 2007.

Benz, Judith G., Associate Professor of German (2008). B.A., The College of William & Mary, 1997; Ph.D., Yale University, 2007.

Biddle, Kathleen R., Professor of Education (2005). The Henry H. ‘57 and Joan R. Gibbel Award for Teaching Excellence (2010). Beachley Distinguished Academic Service Award (2019). B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania, 1976., Ph.D., Tufts University, 1996.

Borgardt, James D., William W. Woolford Professor of Physics (1998). The Henry H. ‘57 and Joan R. Gibbel Award for Teaching Excellence (2003); Beachley Distinguished Teaching Award (2012); B.S., University of California, Santa Barbara, 1989; M.S., Ph.D., University of Arizona, 1995, 1997.

Bowen, Lauren L., Provost and Professor of Politics (2015), B,A., The Ohio State University, 1984; Ph.D., University of Kentucky, 1992.

Braxton, Donald M., J. Omar Good Professor of Religion (2002). B.A., Wittenberg University, 1986; A.M., Ph.D., The University of Chicago, 1987, 1993.

Bukowski, John F., Professor of Mathematics (1997). Beachley Distinguished Academic Service Award (2013). Beachley Distinguished Teaching Award (2018). B.S., Carnegie Mellon University, 1991; Sc.M., Ph.D., Brown University, 1992, 1997.

Buonaccorsi, Vincent P., Professor of Biology (2001). Beachley Distinguished Academic Service Award (2015). B.S., University of Notre Dame, 1993; Ph.D., College of William and Mary, 1998.

Camenga, Kristin A., Associate Professor Mathematics (2016). B.A., St. Olaf College, 1997; M.S., Ph.D., Cornell University, 2005, 2006.

Cockett, Lynn S., Professor of Communication (2001). Henry H.’57 and Joan R. Gibbel Award for Teaching Excellence (2006); B.S., Messiah College, 1989; M.L.S., Ph.D., Rutgers-The State University of New Jersey, 1993, 2000.

Cook-Huffman, Celia B., W. Clay and Kathryn H. Burkholder Professor of Conflict Resolution (1990). Junior Faculty Award (1996). Beachley Distinguished Academic Service Award (2010). B.A., Manchester College, 1986; M.A., University of Notre Dame, 1988; Ph.D., Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs of Syracuse University, 1993.

DeHaas, Sarah J., Martin G. Brumbaugh Professor of Education (1997). B.S., Slippery Rock State College 1980. M.Ed, Providence College 1988; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 1991.

DeVries, Cynthia Merriwether, Associate Professor of Sociology (2002). Beachley Distinguished Academic Service Award (2018).B.S., M.S., Ph.D. The Pennsylvania State University, 1990, 1994, 2000.

Dickey, William M., Associate Professor of English (2008). B.A., Shippensburg University, 2000; M.A., University of New Orleans, 2003; Ph.D., Indiana University of Pennsylvania, 2010.

Dries, Daniel R., Associate Professor of Chemistry (2012). The Henry H. ’57 & Joan R. Gibbel Award for Teaching Excellence (2018);  B.S., University of Delaware, 2000; Ph.D., University of California, San Diego, 2007.

Dunwoody, Philip T., Professor of Psychology (2004). The Henry H. ‘57 and Joan R. Gibbel Award for Teaching Excellence (2010). B.A., Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, 1994; M.S., Ph.D., University of Georgia, 1998, 2000.

Escuadro, Henry, Professor of Mathematics (2007). B.S., M.S., Ateneo de Manila University, 1994, 1997; Ph.D. Western Michigan University, 2006.

Fala, Grace M., Professor of Communication (1992). Junior Faculty Award (1998); Beachley Distinguished Academic Service Award (2004). A.A., Bucks County Community College, 1978; B.A., M.A., West Chester University, 1986, 1988; Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University, 1993.

Fletcher, Alison, W. Newton and Hazel A. Long Professor of History (2007). The Henry H. ‘57 and Joan R. Gibbel Award for Teaching Excellence (2011). Bryn Mawr College; M.A., Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University, 1995, 2003.

Frazier-Yoder, Amy, Associate Professor of Spanish (2009). The Henry H. ’57 and Joan R. Gibbel Award for Teaching Excellence (2017).  B.A., Washington & Lee University, 1999; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia, 2004, 2010.

Gibboney, Ryan, Assistant Professor of Integrated Media Arts (2018). B.A., Savannah College of Art and Design, 2008; MFA, Purdue University, 2013

Glazier, Douglas S., Professor of Biology (1980). Beachley Distinguished Academic Service Award (2000). B.A., Oakland University, 1973; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1979.

Goldstein, Peter M., John Downey Benedict Professor of English (1991). Beachley Distinguished Teaching Award (2004). B.A., Harvard University, 1976; J.D., University of Southern California, 1979; Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles, 1991.

Grant, Christopher J., Assistant Professor of Biology (2019) B.S., M.S., Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University, 2003, 2005, 2012.

Hayer, Holly J., Associate Professor of Spanish (2005). B.A., Ursinus College, 1985; M.S., Ph.D., Georgetown University, 1991, 1997.

Hayes, Dawn, Assistant Professor of Education (2018).  B.S., Juniata College, 1995; M.A., Wilkes University, 2007; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 2017.

Henderson, Michael S., Associate Professor of French (1992). Beachley Distinguished Academic Service Award (2012); B.A., M.A., Arizona State University, 1982, 1984; Ph.D., University of California, Santa Barbara, 1991.

Hosler, Jay, David K. Goodman ’74 Professor of Biology (2000). The Henry H. ‘57 and Joan R. Gibbel Award for Teaching Excellence (2005). Beachley Distinguished Teaching Award (2016).  B.A., DePauw University, 1989; Ph.D., University of Notre Dame, 1995.

Hsiung, David C., Dr. Charles R. and Shirley A. Knox Professor of History (1991). Junior Faculty Award (1995). Beachley Award for Distinguished Teaching (2007). B.A., Yale University, 1983; M.A., Ph.D., The University of Michigan, 1985, 1991.

Innerst, Melissa, Assistant Professor of Mathematics (2019).  B.S., Texas Lutheran University, 2015; M.S., Ph.D., Baylor University, 2016, 2019. 

Johanesen, Katharine, Assistant Professor of Geology (2015). B.S., Beloit College, 2006; Ph.D., University of Southern California, 2011.

Johnson, Dennis L., George “Fritz” Blechschmidt ’54 Professor of Environmental Science (1999). B.A., Lock Haven University, 1989; B.S., M.S., Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University, 1989, 1992, 1995.

Jones, Kathleen M., Professor of Education (2005). B.S., M.S., Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University, 1985, 1995, 2009.

Keeney, Jill B., Charles A. Dana Professor of Biology (1994). Junior Faculty Award (1999). Beachley Distinguished Academic Service Award (2011). B.S., The Pennsylvania State University, 1985; Ph.D., Washington University, 1990.

Konduk, Burak Cem. Assistant Professor of Management (2018). B.A., Bilkent University, 2001; MBA, Sabanci University, 2003; Ph.D., Georgia State University, 2013).

Kruse, Gerald W., John ’54 and Irene “58 Dale Professor of Math and Computer Science (1999). Beachley Distinguished Academic Service Award (2017). B.S., University of Illinois, 1985; Sc.M., Ph.D., Brown University, 1993, 1997.

Lamendella, Regina, George ’75 and Cynthia ’76 Valko Endowed Professorship In Biological Sciences (2012). The Henry H. ‘57 and Joan R. Gibbel Award for Teaching Excellence (2016). B.S., Lafayette College, 2004; M.S., Ph.D., University of Cincinnati, College of Engineering, 2006, 2009.

Latten, James E., Professor of Music (2002). B.S., Mansfield University, 1986; M.S., Indiana University, 1990; Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University, 2002.

Maleska, Monika, Professor of Art (2006). B.A., University of Manitoba, Canada, 1998; M.F.A, University of Texas at San Antonio, 2001

Mathur, Amy E., Associate Professor of English (2006). B.A., Juniata College, 1996; M.S., Carnegie Mellon University, 1997; Ph.D., University of Arizona, 2009.

Mathur, Ryan D., Professor of Geology (2001). B.A., Juniata College, 1996; Ph.D., University of Arizona, 2000.

Matter, John M., Associate Professor of Biology (1997). B.A., University of Missouri, 1983; M.S., Saint Louis University, 1987; Ph.D., University of Florida, 1995.

McKellop, J. Mark, Professor of Psychology (2002). Henry H.’57 and Joan R. Gibbel Award for Teaching Excellence (2008) B.A., The Ohio State University, 1994; M.A., Ph.D., University of Cincinnati, 2000.

Meersman, James , Assistant Professor of Accounting, Business & Economics (2017). B.A., M.S., Texas A&M University, May’s School of Business, 2013, 2014.

Merovich, George T., Jr., Associate Professor of Environmental Sciece & Studies (2015). B.S., The University of Arizona, 1994; M.S., Frostburg State University, 1998; Ph.D., West Virginia University, 2007.

Miller, Robert J., Rosenberger Professor of Christian and Religious Studies (2003). B.A., St. John’s College, 1975; M.A., University of California, Santa Barbara, 1978; M.A., Ph.D., Claremont Graduate School, 1980, 1986.

Muth, Norris Z., Professor of Biology (2007). B.A., Brown University, 1997; M.S., Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, 1999; Ph.D., State University of New York, Stony Brook, 2006.

Nagengast, Emil, Professor of Politics (1996). Junior Faculty Award (2000). Beachley Award for Distinguished Teaching (2011). B.A., Middlebury College, 1984; M.A., University of Kansas, 1990; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh, 1996.

Page, Amanda M., Assistant Professor of English (2013). B.A., Wellesley College, 2003; M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2005, 2011.

Pelkey, Neil W., Associate Professor of Environment Science and Studies and Information Technology (2002). B.A., University of California; Ph.D., University of California.

Peruso, Dominick F., Professor of Accounting (1999). Beachley Award for Distinguished Teaching (2016).  B.S., Saint Francis College, 1995; M.Ed., Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University, 1999; 2012; C.P.A. in Pennsylvania.

Plane, Dennis L., Professor of Politics (2004). B.A., Rollins College, 1993; Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin, 2002.

Poole, Territa L., Professor of Psychology (2017).  B.S., M.S., M.A., Ph.D., 2017, University of West Alabama.

Powell, Matthew G., Professor of Geology (2007). Henry H.’57 and Joan R. Gibbel Award for Teaching Excellence (2013). B.S., M.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 1998, 2000; Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University, 2005.

Prill, Susan E., Professor of Religion (2006). B.A., Bard College, 1996; M.A., University of Michigan, 2000; Ph.D., University of London, 2005.

Radis, Susan T., Professor of Social Work and Sociology (1984). B.S., The Pennsylvania State University, 1969; M.S.S., Bryn Mawr College, 1973.

Ramakrishnan, Uma, Professor of Environmental Science and Studies (2005). B.Sc., Bangalore University; M.S., Pondicherry University; Ph.D., University of California, Davis, 1999.

Rhodes, Loren K., John and Irene Dale Professor of Information Technology (1980). Lindback Distinguished Teaching Award (1986). Beachley Award for Distinguished Teaching (2008). B.S., M.S., Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University, 1979, 1980, 1991.

Roberts, Wade, Associate Professor of Philosophy (2008). B.A., Birmingham-Southern College, 1996; M.A., Ph.D., Duquesne University, 1997, 2007.

Roney, James N., I. Harvey Brumbaugh Professor of Russian (1988). Lindback Distinguished Teaching Award (1993). Beachley Distinguished Teaching Award (2009). B.A., Dartmouth College, 1973; M.A., Ph.D., The Ohio State University, 1975, 1981.

Rosenberger, Randy M., Professor of Management (1997). B.A., Dickinson College, 1980; M.B.A., Cornell University, 1985; Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University, 1999.

Roth, Kimberly A., Professor of Mathematics (2006). B.A., Oberlin College, 1996; Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University, 2002.

Shelley, Russell K., Elma Stine Heckler Professor of Music and Director of Choral and Vocal Activities (1991). Junior Faculty Award (1997). B.S., B.S.M., Baptist Bible College, 1985; M.S., Mansfield University, 1986; Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University, 1997.

Shen, Li, Assistant Professor of Marketing (2017). B.A., Central South University, 2005; M.S., Ph.D., Southern New Hampshire University, 2010, 2016.

Stenson, Catherine A., Professor of Mathematics (2000). Sc.B., Brown University, 1994; M.S., Cornell University, 1997; Ph.D., Cornell University, 2000.

Stiffler, Douglas A., Associate Professor of History (2002). A.B., Harvard College, 1990; M.A., University of California, 1993.

Streb, Jennifer L., Professor of Art History (2008), The Henry H. ‘57 and Joan R. Gibbel Award for Teaching Excellence, 2014, Juniata College, 1993; M.A., Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University, 1997, 2004.

Thomas, William H., Professor of Information Technology (2001). Beachley Distinguished Teaching Award (2017). B.S., Lock Haven University, 1983; M.S., Shippensburg University, 1990.

Thurston-Griswold, Henry, Professor of Spanish (1992). Beachley Distinguished Teaching Award (2003) B.A., State University of New York at Cortland, 1981; M.A., Ph.D., The University of Texas at Austin, 1983, 1989.

Tuten, Belle S., Charles A. Dana Professor of History (1997). Beachley Junior Faculty Award (2001) Beachley Award for Distinguished Teaching (2013). B.A., College of Charleston, 1991; M.A., Ph.D., Emory University, 1994, 1997.

Tuten, James H., Professor of History (2006). The Henry H. ‘57 and Joan R. Gibbel Award for Teaching Excellence (2009).  Beachley Distinguished Teaching Award (2019). B.A. College of Charleston, 1990; M.A., Wake Forest University, 1992; Ph.D., Emory University, 2006.

Unger, John B., Associate Professor of Chemistry (2012). B.S., Hobart College; Ph.D., University of California Santa Barbara.

Utterback, Neal, Associate Professor of Theatre Arts (2012). B.S., Coastal Caroline University, 1998; MFA, University of Florida, 2001; Ph.D., Indiana University, 2012.

Walker, Polly O., Associate Professor of Peace & Conflict Studies (2015).  B.S., New Mexico State University; 1975, M.A., New Mexico State University, 1983, Ph.D., University of Queensland, Australia, 2001.

Wang, Wei-Chung, Associate Professor of Business & Economics and Director of Program Global Program Development (2010). B.A., Shih Hsin University, 2000; M.S., Ph.D., University of California, Irvine, 2005.

Wang, Xinli, Professor of Philosophy (1999). B.S., Changchun Institute of Geology, China 1982; M.A., Huazhong University, 1988; Ph.D., University of Connecticut, 1999.

Weimer, Donna S., Colonel Sedgley and Elizabeth Bailey Thornbury Professor of Communication (1990). Lindback Distinguished Teaching Award (1993). Beachley Award for Academic Service (2003). B.A., M.A., Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University, 1974, 1983, 1990.

Welliver, Daniel M., Professor of Sociology (2006). Henry H. ’57 and Joan R. Gibbel Award for Teacing Excellence (2012); B.A., Juniata College, 1979; M.C.P., The Pennsylvania State University, 1990; Ph.D., Indiana University of Pennsylvania, 2011.

Westcott, Kathryn M., Professor of Psychology, (2003). Beachley Award for Distinguished Teaching (2014). B.A., The Ohio State University, 1994; M.Ed., Ph.D., University of Cincinnati, 1998, 2001.

White, James D., William I. and Zella B. Book Professor of Physics (1998). The Henry H. '57 and Joan R. Gibbel Award for Teaching Excellence (2004). ); Beachley Award for Distinguished Teaching (2014).  B.A., Carleton College, 1985; M.Ed., Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University, 1993, 1994.

Widman, David R., Professor of Psychology (1999). B.S., University of Wyoming , 1987; Ph.D., University of Albany, State University of New York, 1992.

Williams, Ursula, Assistant Professor of Chemistry (2014).  B.S., Union College, 2009; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 2014.

Worley, Sarah C., Associate Professor of Communication (2004). B.A., Juniata College, 2000; M.A., The University of Colorado, 2003., Ph.D. The Pennsylvania State University, 2016.

Wright, John J., Associate Professor of Computer Science (2002). B.S., Juniata College, 1993; M.S., Villanova University, 2000.

Administration

Office of the President

Information Technology and Library Services

Academic Affairs

Student Affairs

  • Althouse, Jody K Senior Associate Dean of Health and Wellness
  • Cole, Bailey Title IX Hearing Advisor
  • Damschroder, Matthew Vice President For Student Life & Dean of Students
  • Erdley, Danielle Residential Life Coordinator
  • Kane, Richard J Assistant Director of the Juniata Pep Band
  • Klug, Isabella Residential Life Coordinator
  • Lafreniere, Jacob Title IX Hearing Advisor
  • Paschal, Erin Associate Dean of Students
  • Walters, Rylee Residential Life Coordinator
  • Yon, Jon C Director of the Juniata Pep Band
  • Athletic Department Coaches & Advisors

    College Advancement

  • Bayles, Gregory A Associate Director of Major Gifts
  • Cramer, Lori A Annual Giving Specialist
  • Dickey, Kathleen S Director of Grants and Foundation Relations
  • Hall, Greta G Director of Annual Giving
  • Keating, Michael S Director of Corporate and Foundation Support
  • Koelle, Terry A Executive Assistant to the Vice President for Advancement
  • Mansberger, Alexander S Assistant Director of Major Gifts
  • Oberle, Sally A Director of Advancement Services
  • Sieber, Susan D Gift Processing & Advancement Assistant
  • Stoudnour, Mathew L Assistant Vice President for Development
  • Watt, James R Vice President for Advancement
  • Marketing

    College Enrollment

  • Blair, Erica S Admission Operations Assistant
  • Boerstler, Alisha M Director of Enrollment Communication
  • Cook-Huffman, Grace G Admission Counselor
  • DeHaven, Brittany N Senior Associate Dean of Admission
  • Fouse, Marissa A Campus Visit Coordinator
  • Gibboney, Cindy A Director of Admission Systems and Operations
  • Harpster, Jessica Assistant Dean of Graduate and Transfers Admissions
  • McCarthy, Catherine K Admission Counselor
  • Moran, Jason R Vice President for Enrollment
  • Novak, Jacob M Admission Counselor
  • Onyido, Reginald Senior Associate Dean of Admission
  • Senel, Tessa V Admission Counselor
  • Simons, Steven Dean of Admission
  • Toro, Roberto J Admission Counselor
  • Zilch, Andrea J Admission Counselor
  • Zilch, Pamela S Enrollment Application Specialist
  • Business Affairs

    Campus Ministry

    Staff & Departmental Assistants

  • Bumbarger, Heather A Educational Services Assistant
  • Sones, Allison Educational Services Assistant
  • White, Tracy L Educational Services Assistant
  • Emeriti

    Board of Trustees – Emeriti

    Date in Parentheses is that of appointment to the board.

    Andrews, David P. '74, B.A., J.D., Hollidaysburg, PA (1992-1995; 1999)

    Baker, Anne C., B.A., B.M., M.A., J.D., New York, NY (1987)

    Brinker, John A. ’69, B.S., M.B.A., Santa Barbara, CA (2000)

    Brown, Charles C., Jr. ’59, B.A., J.D., Bellefonte, PA (1976-79, 1981)

    Chang-Lo, Patrick, B.S., M.S., San Rafael, CA (2011)

    Cramer, John McN. ’63, B.A., LL.B., Harrisburg, PA (1982)

    Dale, John A. ’54, B.S., M.A., L.H.D., Medford, NJ (1997)

    Davis, Bruce '65, B.A., M.F.A., Los Angeles, CA (2012)  

    Detwiler, Donald L. ’64, B.S., Hollidaysburg, PA (1994)

    Gibbel, Henry H. ’57, B.S., Lititz, PA (1973-76, 1978)

    Green, Madeleine F., B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Chevy Chase, MD (2003)

    Halbritter, Barry J. ’65, B.S., Duncansville, PA (1987)

    Hess, Kenneth E. ’75, B.S., Ephrata, PA (2000)

    Hesselbein, Frances R., L.H.D., New York, NY (1988)

    Hill, John, T., B.A., Pennington, NJ (2012)

    Hogan, David J. '61., B.A., New York, NY (2005)

    Kindig, Karl K. ’72, B.S., J.D., Abingdon, VA (1994)

    McDowell, Robert N. '67, B.A., M.A., Huntingdon, PA (1999)

    McKonly, Linda W. '73, B.S., Hanover, PA (2005)

    Michel, Harriet R. ’65, B.A., L.H.D., New York, NY (1989)

    Patterson, Wayne C. ’60, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Parker, CO (1986)

    Paullin, Carol Ellis '71, B.S., M.Ed., Palm Coast, FL (2011)

    Pollock, Gayle W. ’68, B.S., Lewisburg, PA (2005)  

    Schwemmlein, Christoph '84, B.S. M.B.A., Nuremberg, Germany (2001)

    Shreiner, Patricia J. ’62, B.S., P.A., Chambersburg, PA (2001)

    Strueber, Michael M. B.S., M.A., M.Ed., Hollidaysburg, PA (2003)

    Swigart, Patricia B., B.T., A.A., Huntingdon, PA (1999)

    Taylor, Maurice C., '72, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., J.D., Baltimore, MD (1993)

    Wagoner, Robert E. ’53, B.S., Palmyra, PA (1982)

    Faculty

    Date in Parentheses is that of emeritus status.

    Bowser, John D., Associate Professor of Mathematics, Emeritus (1997). B.S., Juniata College, 1957; M.S., West Virginia University, 1959; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, 1976.

    Boyle, Michael D.P., William J. von Liebig Chair in Biomedical Sciences, Emeritus (2012). Beachley Award for Distinguished Teaching (2010). B.S., University of Glasgow, Scotland, 1971; Ph.D., Chester Beatty Research Institute, England, 1974.

    Burkhardt, Marlene E., Professor of Accounting, Business and Economics, Emerita (2019). B.A., Wilkes College, 1980; M.S.W., University of Maryland, 1982; Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University, 1990.

    Cherry, Elizabeth A. Ellis, Professor of History, Emerita (1998). Beachley Distinguished Academic Service Award (1990). Beachley Distinguished Teaching Award (1998). A.B., College of Wooster, 1956; A.M., Columbia University, 1957.

    Church, Evelyn H., Assistant Professor of Spanish, Emerita (1991). A.B., Wake Forest College, 1949; M.A., Middlebury College, 1970.

    Crouch, Howard H., Martin G. Brumbaugh Professor of Education, Emeritus (1989). B.S., Ohio State University, 1949; Ed.M., Westminster College, 1953; Ph.D., Ohio State University, 1964.

    Demarest, Jeffery R., Professor of Biology, Emeritus (2014). B.S., Monmouth College, 1973; Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 1980.

    Donaldson, James R., Professor of Accounting, Business and Economics, Emeritus (2012). Beachley Distinguished Academic Service Award (1998). B.S., Juniata College, 1967; M.A., University of Akron, 1972; M.B.A., Syracuse University, 1984.

    Drews, David R., Charles A. Dana Professor of Psychology, Emeritus (2004). Beachley Distinguished Teaching Award (1989). B.A., Dennison University, 1965; M.S., Ph.D., University of Delaware, 1968, 1970.

    Duey, William E., Assistant Professor of Economics and Business Administration and Registrar, Emeritus (2000). B.S., The Pennsylvania State University, 1959; MBA, George Washington University, 1970; M.A., Shippensburg University, 1986.

    Esch, Linda Sue, Charles A. Dana Professor of Mathematics, Emerita (2007). Lindback Distinguished Teaching Award (1979). Beachley Distinguished Teaching Award (1990). B.S., Juniata College, 1968; A.M., Ph.D., Boston University, 1970, 1974.

    Fisher, Tom L., Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus (2013). Beachley Distinguished Academic Service Award (2002). B.S., Old Dominion University, 1964; PhD., Iowa State University, 1970.

    Glosenger, Fay I., Dilling Professor of Early Childhood Education, Emerita (2018). Lindback Distinguished Teaching Award (1988), Beachley Distinguished Academic Service Award (1997). B.S., M.Ed., Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, 1971, 1977, 1984.

    Gooch, James L., Professor of Biology, Emeritus (2000). Beachley Distinguished Teaching Award (1982). B.S., M.S., West Virginia University, 1960, 1967, Ph.D., University of Delaware, 1968.

    Gustafson, Todd D., Professor of Biology, Emeritus (2007). Lindback Distinguished Teaching Award (1981). B.A., Jacksonville University, 1971; M.S., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 1973, 1976.

    Heberling, Paul M., Professor of Anthropology, Emeritus (1989). Beachley Distinguished Teaching Award (1969) A.B., M.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1948, 1950.

    Heller, Bernice Engman, Associate Professor of Spanish, Emerita (1997). A.B., College of Wooster, 1953; A.M., University of Kansas, 1955.

    Heller, Max N., Associate Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science, Emeritus (1997). B.S., M.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1958, 1976; M.A.T., Indiana University, 1967.

    Hochberg, Mark R., Charles A. Dana Professor of English, Emeritus (2017). Beachley Distinguished Teaching Award (1980). B.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1966; M.A., Ph.D., Cornell University, 1969, 1970.

    Jaeger, Klaus A.G., I. Harvey Brumbaugh Professor of German, Emeritus (2008). Beachley Distinguished Teaching Award (1992). M.A., Ohio State University, 1965; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, 1989.

    Kaminsky, Edward F., Professor of Economics and Business Administration, Emeritus (1997). B.S., King’s College, 1996; M.B.A., Wilkes College, 1973; C.P.A. in Pennsylvania.

    Katz, Judith N., Associate Professor of English, Emerita (2014). Beachley Award for Distinguished Teaching (2006). B.A., City College of New York, 1966; M.A., Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, 1968, 1972.

    Kaylor, Earl C., Jr., Charles A. Dana Supported Professor of History, Emeritus (1991). Beachley Distinguished Teaching Award (1972). A.B., Juniata College, 1946; B.D., Bethany Theological Seminary, 1949; A.M., University of Notre Dame, 1951; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, 1963.

    Kipphan, Klaus P., Charles A. Dana Professor of History, Emeritus (2003). Beachley Distinguished Teaching Award (1974, 2001). A.B., Gymnasium Eberbach, Germany, 1959; A.M., Fairleigh Dickinson University, 1965; Ph.D., University of Heidelberg, 1969.

    Kirchhof-Glazier, Debra A., Professor of Biology, Emerita (2017). Lindback Distinguished Teaching Award (1987). Beachley Distinguished Academic Service Award (1999) B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1973; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1979.

    Lakso, James J., Professor of Accounting, Business and Economics, Emeritus (2013). Beachley Distinguished Teaching Award (1983). Beachley Distinguished Academic Service (2005). B.A., Wittenberg University, 1967; M.A., Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1970, 1973.

    Lewis, Janet R., Associate Professor of Philosophy, Emerita (2008). Sears-Roebuck Teaching Excellence and Campus Leadership Award (1991). Beachley Award for Distinguished Teaching (1999) B.A., Wilson College, 1964; M.A., Bryn Mawr College, 1968.

    Masters, Henry G., Associate Professor of Psychology, Emeritus (1999). B.A., University of Rochester, 1958; M.A., Emory University, 1961; Ph.D., Kansas State University, 1968.

    McBride, Alexander T., Professor of Art, Emeritus (2005). Beachley Distinguished Teaching Award (2002). B.F.A., Rhode Island School of Design, 1962; M.F.A., Cornell University, 1964.

    Mitchell, Donald J., Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus (2003). Beachley Distinguished Teaching Award (1986). Beachley Distinguished Academic Service Award (1991). B.S., Westminster College, 1960; Ph.D. Vanderbilt University, 1965.

    Murray, M. Andrew, Elizabeth Evans Baker Professor of Religion and Peace and Conflict Studies and Director of the Baker Institute, Emeritus (2008). L.H.D. Bridgewater College (1998). Beachley Distinguished Academic Service Award (1991). B.A., Bridgewater College, 1964; M.Div., D.Min., Bethany Theological Seminary, 1968, 1980; L.H.D., Manchester College, 1993.

    Mutti, Laurence J., Professor of Geology (2015). Lindback Distinguished Teaching Award (1982). Beachley Distinguished Teaching Award (1995). B.A., Beloit College, 1971; Ph.D., Harvard University, 1978.

    Norris, Wilfred G., William I. and Zella B. Book Professor of Physics, Emeritus (1998). Beachley Distinguished Academic Service Award (1993). B.S., Juniata College, 1954; Ph.D., Harvard University, 1963.

    Ochiai, Ei-Ichiro, H. George Foster Chair of Chemistry, Emeritus (2005). B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Tokyo, 1959, 1961, 1964.

    Park, Valerie G., Associate Professor of Education, Emeritus (2016). B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1979; M.Ed., Shippensburg State University, 1982; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, 2005.

    Reed, Ruth E., Jacob H. and Rachel Brumbaugh Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus (2012). Beachley Distinguished Teaching Award (1993). B.A., Winthrop College, 1968; Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 1974.

    Reilly, F. Robert, Charles A. Dana Professor of Social Work and Sociology, Emeritus (2012). Beachley Distinguished Teaching Award (1991). B.A., Susquehanna University, 1971; M.S.W., Marywood College School of Social Work, 1974; A.C.S.W. member.

    Reingold, I. David, H. George Foster Chair of Chair of Chemistry, Emeritus (2012). Lindback Distinguished Teaching Award (1992). Beachley Distinguished Academic Service Award (2001). A.B., Dartmouth College, 1971; Ph.D., University of Oregon, 1976.

    Richardson, Kim M., Professor of Education, Emerita (1979). Lindback Distinguished Teaching Award (1983). Beachley Distinguished Academic Service Award (1996). B.A., Duke University, 1969; M.S., Old Dominion University, 1972; Ph.D., Temple University, 1981.

    Rockwell, Kenneth H., Professor of Biology, Emeritus (2000). Beachley Distinguished Teaching Award (1979). B.S., Juniata College, 1957; M.S., Brown University, 1960; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, 1967.

    Rosell, Karen J., Professor of Art History, Emerita (2019). Lindback Distinguished Teaching Award (1989). Beachley Distinguished Teaching Award (1997). B.A., University of Richmond, 1980; M.A., Virginia Commonwealth University, 1982; Ph.D., Ohio University, 1986.

    Russey, William E., Charles A. Dana Supported Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus (2001). Beachley Distinguished Teaching Award (1975). B.A., Kalamazoo College, 1961; M.A., Ph.D., Harvard University, 1964, 1966.

    Schettler, Paul D., Jr., Charles A. Dana Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus (2017). Beachley Distinguished Teaching Award (1978). Beachley Distinguished Academic Service Award (1995). B.S., University of Utah, 1958; Ph.D., Yale University, 1964.

    Siems, Norman E., William W. Woolford Professorship in Physics, Emeritus (2011). Lindback Distinguished Teaching Award (1984). Beachley Distinguished Teaching Award (1994). Beachley Distinguished Academic Service (2009). B.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 1966; M.S., Johns Hopkins University, 1970; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1976.

    Sowell, David L., Professor of History, Emeritus (2017). Junior Faculty Award (1994). Beachley Distinguished Academic Service (2007). A.B., Western Kentucky University, 1975; B.A., Grand Valley State Colleges, 1976; M.A., Ph.D., University of Florida, 1980,1986.

    Sunderland, Benjamin B., Professor of Mathematics, Emeritus (2016). Beachley Distinguished Teaching Award (2015); B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, 1970, 1975, 1982.

    Trexler, J. Peter, Professor of Geology, Emeritus (1989). Beachley Distinguished Teaching Award (1976). A.B., M.S., Lehigh University, 1950, 1953; Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1964.

    Troy, Jack G., Associate Professor of Art, Emeritus (2005). B.S., West Chester College, 1961; M.A., Kent State University, 1967.

    Wagoner, Paula L., Associate Professor of Anthropology (2015). A.A., Sheridan College, 1988; A.B., Smith College, 1991; M.A., Ph.D., Indiana University, 1995, 1997.

    Wagoner, Robert E., Professor of Philosophy, Emeritus (2000). Beachley Distinguished Teaching Award (1988). B.S., Manchester College, 1952; Ph.D., Harvard University 1968.

    Wampler, Dale L., Professor of Computer Science, Emeritus (1999). Beachley Distinguished Academic Service Award (1981). A.B., Bridgewater College, 1957; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 1962.

    Washburn, Robert H., Professor of Geology, Emeritus (2001). B.S., M.S., University of Nebraska, 1959, 1961; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1966.

    Weaver, Patricia C., Charles A. Dana Professor of Accounting, Business and Economics, Emerita (2019). Beachley Award for Distinguished Teaching (2000). Beachley Distinguished Academic Service (2008). B.A., M.A., M.S., The Pennsylvania State University, 1963, 1965, 1991; C.P.A. in Pennsylvania.

    Woodrow, Thomas W., Martin G. Brumbaugh Professor of Education, Emeritus (1997). Beachley Distinguished Academic Service Award (1992). B.S., Juniata College, 1958; M.Ed., Indiana University of Pennsylvania, 1966; D.Ed., Pennsylvania State University, 1976.

    Wright, Dale E., Professor of Psychology, Emeritus (2002). A.B., Chico State College, 1959; B.D., Berkeley Baptist Divinity School, 1962; Ph.D., University of Vermont, 1970.

    Zimmerer, Robert P., Charles A. Dana Supported Professor of Biology, Emeritus (1993). Beachley Distinguished Teaching Award (1985). B.S., University of Wisconsin, 1954; M.S., Cornell University, 1961; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, 1966.

    Administration

    Date in parentheses is that of emeritus status.

     

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