Core Courses

PACS-105 Introduction to Conflict Resolution
Variable;  Yearly;  Credits: 3;  S;
A survey of the field of conflict, this course explores the causes and consequences of social conflict. Theory and case studies are used to understand interpersonal disputes, the intricacies of groups in conflict and international issues and crisis. Emphasis is given to understanding the basic theoretical concepts of the field and developing basic conflict resolving skills. 

PACS-110 Introduction to Peace & Conflict Studies
Either Semester;  Yearly;  Credits: 3;  I,SWGH2;
This course explores war and deep-rooted conflict as human problems and peace as a human potential. Students collaborate in small groups to explore a range of different approaches to peace around the world. Prerequisite or corequisite: FYC or CWS

PACS-305 Gender and Conflict
Fall;  Yearly;  Credits: 3;  S,I,CW;
Examines how an understanding of gender issues is critical to understanding, assessing, and effectively addressing many conflicts. The course takes an interdisciplinary look at conflicts ranging from the differing experiences of women and men in conflict to interconnections between masculinity, femininity, security and warfare. An analysis of the ways in which gender issues cause and escalate conflicts is paired with discussions of how to address, challenge, wage and/or resolve gendered conflicts. Prerequisite: Sophomore, Junior, or Senior standing.

PACS-308 Nonviolence: Theory & Practice
Either Semester;  Variable;  Credits: 3;  S,H,CW;
A study of the theory and practice of non-violence, this course explores both the theoretical development of nonviolence and the use of nonviolence as a means for waging and resolving conflict. The course explores nonviolence theory as it applies to issues of social change, alternative defense, and personal transformation, using writings from political, sociological, feminist, religious and philosophical perspectives. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing recommended.

PACS-405 Conflict Transformation
Spring;  Odd Years;  Credits: 3;  S,I,CW;
This is theCapstone course for students with PACS in their POE. The course explores the possibilities for achieving justice, reconciliation, and sustainable peace in societies where protracted ethnic and political conflicts have had a devastating impact. The course examines the root causes of such conflict with a particular focus on how the practices of peace building and conflict transformation seek to mobilize people and resources to transform unjust structures and relationships. Prerequisites: Senior standing, with a primary or secondary emphasis on PACS (or PACS as a strand of an individualized POE), or permission of the instructor.

PACS-490 Peace & Conflict Studies Internship
Fall & Spring;  Yearly;  Credits: 2-9;  I;
An opportunity which requires students to relate theory and practice to a working environment and to reflect upon that experience. Corequisite: PACS 495. Prerequisite: Permission and Jr. or Sr. Standing.

PACS-495 PACS Intern.Res.Sem.
Fall & Spring;  Yearly;  Credits: 2-6;  I;
Requires students to reflect on the internship experience and/or pursue research related to the placement. Prerequisite: PACS110 and permission. Corequisite: PACS490.

 

A semester of study abroad may fulfill the PACS 490 and PACS 495 requirements.

The POE includes a minimum of 8 hours language or competency.

Courses to complete the PACS POE should be chosen from the following four sections. At least 40 credits must come from the core and sections 1, 2 and 3. From section 4, choose prerequisites and electives. Choose at least one course from section 5. At least 18 credits must be at the 300 level or above. The POE must include one approved "CW" course.

Students must be able to defend the coherence and logic of their choices.

To qualify to receive honors, student must also take PACS 455, Honors Thesis and a methods course.

 

Electives

Understanding War & Deep Rooted Conflict (Choose at least 4):

RU-235 Tolstoy
Spring;  Variable;  Credits: 4;  CA,H,I,CW,CS;
An examination of Tolstoy's development as a thinker about war an religion and his search for a literary form adequate for the expression of his ideas and moral sense. Readings will include writings on non-resistance to evil. Prerequisite: EN110 or EN109 or another Russian literature course or permission.

RU-335 Tolstoy
Spring;  Variable;  Credits: 4;  CA,I,H,CW,CS;
See RU235. Meets with RU235. Additional work is assigned in Russian. Prerequisite: RU235.

PACS-300 Anthropology of War & Peace
Credits: 3;  S;
 Prerequisites: PACS 110 or AN 151

CM-420B Media Violence
Variable;  Variable;  Credits: 3;  H,CW;
This media studies course introduces students to basic issues and research surrounding media violence. We take a hard look at media violence and its scholarly research in order to understand the intricacies of both our fascination and repulsion for all of the media's manifestations of violence. Cross-listed in Communication and Peace and Conflicts Studies, this course asks students to critically analyze media violence while integrating current media research into our understanding of violence as a presence in our lives and what we can or should do about it. Prerequisites: CM132 or CM133.

PACS-405 Conflict Transformation
Spring;  Odd Years;  Credits: 3;  S,I,CW;
This is theCapstone course for students with PACS in their POE. The course explores the possibilities for achieving justice, reconciliation, and sustainable peace in societies where protracted ethnic and political conflicts have had a devastating impact. The course examines the root causes of such conflict with a particular focus on how the practices of peace building and conflict transformation seek to mobilize people and resources to transform unjust structures and relationships. Prerequisites: Senior standing, with a primary or secondary emphasis on PACS (or PACS as a strand of an individualized POE), or permission of the instructor.

RL-341 Religion and War
Variable;  Yearly;  Credits: 4;  CA,H,CW;
This course explores the role of religion in warfare. It looks at the evolution of religion and war in our species, modern anthropological investigations of religion and war, religious discussions of war in Western and non-Western religions. 

IC-212 Political Psychology
Fall;  Yearly;  Credits: 3;  IC;
This Interdisciplinary Colloquium examines the overlap between political science and psychology. Topics include how and why citizens from political attitudes, how elected officials make decisions, the influence of values, the structure of political beliefs and ideologies, how citizens interact with each other, political persuasion, and attitude change. Special attention will be given to using political psychology to understand contemporary politics. Prerequisites: EN110 or EN109 and Sophomore, Junior or Senior standing.

 

Paradigms for Waging Conflict (choose at least 2):

SP-275 Art and Activism in Latin America
Fall;  Variable;  Credits: 3;  I,H,CS;
Studies art --literature, film, music, plastic arts, etc.--that denounces social injustice and seeks to trigger fundamental reforms in Latin American societies. Known as arte comprometido or committed art in Latin America, selected violence, economic exploitation, racism, and machismo. The course is conducted in Spanish. Prerequisites: SP210 or by permission of the instructor.

SP-375 Art and Activism in Latin America
Fall;  Variable;  Credits: 3;  I,H,CS;
Studies art --literature, film, music, plastic arts, etc.--that denounces social injustice and seeks to trigger fundamental reforms in Latin American societies. Known as arte comprometido or committed art in Latin America, selected artistic texts treat topics such as political violence, economic exploitation, racism, and machismo. The course is conducted in Spanish. Prerequisites: SP250 or SP255 or by permission of the instructor.

PC-239 Nuclear Threat
Variable;  Yearly;  Credits: 4;  CA,N,H,CW,WK-SP;
This course examines the development and ramifications of nuclear weapons. Students will learn the basic physics upon which these devices operate, and explore moral issues that arose in the interactions of communities impacted by their construction, use, and testing, including the perspectives of scientists, government officials, and affected citizenry. Current issues and concerns regarding nuclear weapons will be studied as well. 

 

Paradigms for Conflict Resolution and Peacebuilding (choose at least 2):

PACS-108 Mediation
Either Semester;  Yearly;  Credits: 1-3;  S;
Students learn the basic model of interest-based mediation and the theoretical framework that guides its use. Role-plays and simulations will be used to prepare students to serve as mediators in a variety of contexts. Students will be trained to use a co-mediation model to resolve interpersonal and small group conflicts. There will be Saturday and Sunday meeting times 9 am-5 pm. There are 3 weekends. You will enroll for 1 weekend if you take 1 credit, 2 weekends if you do 2 credits and 3 if you take 3 credits. Homework assignments will be completed online. 

EB-202 Behavioral Analysis of Organizations
Variable;  Yearly;  Credits: 4;  CW,S;
The broad focus of the course is to examine how individuals come together to form a successful organization. The course is broken into three major sections: people, organizations, and leadership. The course emphasizes student involvement and engages students in a variety of in-class exercises, case analysis role playing exercises, small group exercises, and an off-campus class experience or two. One or more off-campus experiences are required for the course. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

PACS-205 Conflict Intervention
Credits: 3;  S;
 Prerequisites: PACS 105, or PACS 108 or permission

EB-379 Bargaining and Conflict Management
Spring;  Yearly;  Credits: 3;  S,CS;
Bargaining and Conflict Management provides students with an opportunity to learn about bargaining and conflict-management theory. Students will have the opportunity to explore and apply this theory, and to examine aspects of bargaining style, in a variety of bargaining simulations. The course will also have an international component by utilizing international bargaining simulations as an instructional tool. Prerequisite: EB202 or PACS202.

PS-334 Human Rights
Variable;  Variable;  Credits: 3;  I,S;
This class focuses on some of the debates concerning human rights: realism versus idealism; individualism versus communitarianism; universalism versus relativism; religious fundamentalism versus secularism; women's rights as human rights; liberalism versus socialism. We review the historical evolution of human rights. We devote part of the semester to the role of literature and the arts in creating and promoting human rights. Prerequisite: PS102.

 

Interdisciplinary Electives:

IS-104 Ideas & Power in the Modern World
Spring;  All Years;  Credits: 4;  H,I,CW,SWGH1;
An integrative examination of human experience with an emphasis on language, gender, race, and literature and the ways in which different cultures and classes understand human reality. 

HS-305 The American Revolution
Spring;  Variable;  Credits: 4;  H,CW,WK-HT;
The American Revolution reshaped the world by spreading the idea of independence, and it continues to influence our lives in every way, from debating the rights of citizenship to including Hamilton on your playlist. HS-305 examines the origins and consequences of the American Revolution. The central questions include: What caused the American Revolution? How did the United States win the War of Independence? What resulted from the American Revolution? Class activities include extensive discussion, reading, and a role-playing game. 

HS-309 Civil War and Reconstruction
Fall;  Yearly;  Credits: 3;  H,CW,CTDH;
Examines the political, social, military, economic and ideological origins and consequences of the Civil War and Reconstruction. The course looks deeply into several important questions. What caused the Civil War? Why was the Union victorious? Why did the war proceed as it did? What was the nature and legacy of reconstruction? What does this period in our history mean to us now? Prerequisites: HS115 or HS116 and SO, JR, or SR standing.

CM-340 Intercultural Communication
Either Semester;  Yearly;  Credits: 3;  H,I;
This course examines symbolic patterns of communication as they relate to issues of diversity. Interactive skills needed to open channels of communication between and among people of diverse backgrounds are analyzed and developed. A multi-cultural approach to the study of human communication serves as a basis for exploring issues of diversity that include but are not limited to race, gender, class, ability, orientation, religion and ethnicity. Prerequisite: CM230.

CM-133 Mass Media and Society
Either Semester;  Yearly;  Credits: 3;  H,CS;
An examination of the convergence of mass media (print, radio, television, sound, film, and internet) which serve our most common public interests. The focus is on the four primary functions to inform, to entertain, to persuade, and to transmit culture. Students have a better understanding of the tension between media as business and its social responsibility to its citizens. This course is not open to seniors. 

CM-230 Interpersonal Communication
Either Semester;  Yearly;  Credits: 3;  H,CS;
Introduces students to the various theories and styles of one-on-one communication. It emphasizes the transactional approach in the study of the communication process as it occurs in interpersonal relationships. It explores interaction as a way by which we come to know ourselves and each other. Prerequisites: CM130.

PS-222 Western Political Thought
Variable;  Variable;  Credits: 4;  H,WK-HT;
Surveys selected works of philosophers from Plato to Nietzsche. The course will focus on enduring questions -- what is the good, the nature of the best regime, how do freedom and authority intersect, and so on. Pre-Req or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109

PS-243 U.S. Foreign Policy
Variable;  Variable;  Credits: 3;  S,I;
Examines U.S. Foreign Policy from the Monroe Doctrine to the New World Order. Special emphasis is given to the tension between isolationism and globalism in this century. The course will focus on contemporary issues such as: the relationship with the UN, the U.S. as a global policeman, and the role of human rights as an American priority. Prerequisite: PS102.

PS-340 Topics in International Politics
Variable;  Variable;  Credits: 3;  S,I;
Examines international politics in light of a specific topic or issue. The topics include themes such as: Global Environmental Politics, Nationalism, and Competing World Ideologies. 

EB-105 International Economic Issues
Fall & Spring;  Variable;  Credits: 3;  S,I;
Understanding international economics is increasingly important for private and public decision-makers. In a world of growing economic interdependence, the ability of policy makers to provide a stable environment for business is a key issue. Accordingly, this course develops the principle topics of international economics, including trade theory, the balance of payments, the cause and consequences of exchange rate movements, the flow of capital, currency crises and regional trade issues. The applied topics emphasized will be based on the most pressing current issues. 

ESS-100 Environmental Systems I
Variable;  Yearly;  Credits: 4;  N,WK-SP,CTGIS;
This course introduces students to the concept of systems, reviews ecological systems, and then goes on to human systems as these impact the environment. The course will explore the two forces that are at the core of most environmental impacts (climate change, ozone depletion, air and water pollution, and a loss of biodiversity) will be explored as will the fundamental attributes of agriculture, food, soil, and water. Throughout, the influence of culture, society, ethics, and science on the environmental problems will be discussed. Pre-Req or Co-Req: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109

CA-270 Infectious Disease & Society
Either Semester;  Yearly;  Credits: 3;  CA,CTGES,WK-SP;
This course focuses primarily on the impact of ten human infectious diseases that have changed the world. Each disease is analyzed from five distinct perspectives: Clinical, Historical, Economic, Artistic, and Public Health. We also discuss genomics aspects of the infective organisms and of their human hosts. 

 

Methods Courses (Choose at least 1):

CM 320 Qualitative Research Methods
Credits: 3;  S;
 Prerequisites: CM 130 or CM 230 or CM 220 or CM 405

CM-330 Media Analysis
Spring;  Yearly;  Credits: 3;  H,CW,CS;
Designed to explore analytical approaches applied to a variety of media, including advertising, television sitcoms, new shows, propaganda, film, music and architecture, in order to ascertain the persuasive messages inherent in each artifact. By examining the rhetorical choices revealed by each method of criticism, we can better understand the structure of message design, the medium and in a larger sense the cultural values that shape both. Prerequisites: CM132 or CM133.

PY-360 Research Methods and Statistics for Psychology I
Fall & Spring;  Yearly;  Credits: 4;  CW,Q,S;
Part 1 of a 2-part sequence of Research Methods and Statistics for Psychology I and II. This course focuses on becoming a better research producer and a research consumer from a psychological science perspective. Students will learn to think critically about media claims and accurately summarize primary source articles about behavior. Students will learn to use statistical software to accurately describe data. Students will learn to communicate effectively about research through written and oral work and make ethical judgments informed by APA ethical standards. Students will design and execute their own individual research studies. Prerequisite: PY101

PY-361 Research Methods & Stats Psychology II
Fall & Spring;  All Years;  Credits: 4;  S,CW,QS;
This course focuses on becoming a better research producer and a research consumer from a psychological science perspective. Students will learn to think critically about media claims and accurately summarize primary source articles about behavior. Students will learn to use statistical software to accurately describe data. Students will learn to communicate effectively about research through written and oral work and make ethical judgments informed by APA ethical standards. Students will design and execute their own individual research studies. 

AN-311 Topics in Anthropology
Spring;  Variable;  Credits: 3;  S;
Occasional offerings in which students and a professor explore an area of specialized interest. Some themes include religion, gender, culture change, cultural ecology, frontiers and insider/outsider. Prerequisites: AN151 or AN254.

ESS-301 Environmental Methods
Either Semester;  Yearly;  Credits: 3;  N;
This course deals with a variety of environmental issues and problems. This includes the causes and the scientific and social backgrounds needed to understand them. It also introduces the student to the roles of scientists and engineers in dealing with them. The course involves both quantitative and qualitative assessments. Prerequisites: ESS100 and 1 year of chemistry or permission of the instructor.

 

Total credit hours = 45 to 60