SPANISH CORE

Take the following courses:

SP-110 Spanish I

Emphasizes fundamentals of grammar, pronunciation, and language production. The development of skills in oral comprehension, speaking, writing and reading are stressed. Note: Students receive H or I credit provided that they have not taken more than two years of the language at the secondary school level.

4 CreditsH, I 

SP-120 Spanish II

Spanish 120 is the second part of a three-semester introductory sequence. Its primary goals are to enable students to build their proficiency and attain a broader understanding of Hispanic cultures. Emphasis is placed on the use of the target language in the classroom and the study of culturally authentic materials. Students will achieve greater accuracy with basic language structures. 

4 CreditsH, I, CS, SWGLSPre-req: SP110 or placement test.

SP-210 Spanish III

Spanish 210 is the third part of a three-semester introductory sequence. Its primary goals are to enable students to build their proficiency and attain a broader understanding of Hispanic cultures. Emphasis is on the use of the target language and the study of culturally authentic materials. Students will achieve greater accuracy with basic language structures. 

3 CreditsH, I, CS, SWGLSPre-req: SP-120 or placement results.

SP-230 Spanish Conversation & Composition

SP230 focuses on continued learning of Spanish through the practice of speaking and writing. Students discuss short films, readings, and topics of interest from the Hispanic world. Through practice in and outside of class and study of grammatical structures and vocabulary, students will improve their reading and listening comprehension and their speaking and writing competence. 

3 CreditsH, I, CW, CS, SWGLSPrerequisite: SP210 or placement test results.

SP-235 Intensive Spanish Grammar

This course serves to reinforce the fundamental grammar that students have studied previously and to delve more deeply into certain topics that often prove to be challenging for native English speakers of Spanish. Topics typically of this course include; identifying the building blocks of sentences; identifying verb classes and studying how that information determines the way we construct sentences; analyzing the Spanish pronominal system including, subject and object clitic pronouns; reviewing and expanding upon the use of subordinate clauses introduced in SP210. 

3 CreditsH, IPrerequisites: SP210.


Take one of the following courses:

SP-245 Spanish Phonetics & Phonology

This course serves as an introduction to the phonetics and phonology of Spanish. The goals of the course include providing students with a theoretical and practical understanding of the system of Spanish sounds, including dialectal variations, as well as strengthening students' Spanish speech in the direction of more native like pronunciation.

3 CreditsH, I, CSPrerequisite: SP210.

SP-345 Spanish Phonetics & Phonology

This course serves as an introduction to the phonetics and phonology of Spanish. The goals of the course include providing students with a theoretical and practical understanding of the system of Spanish sounds, including dialectal variations, as well as strengthening students' Spanish speech in the direction of more native like pronunciation.

3 CreditsH, I, CSPrerequisite: Study abroad experience or permission of the instructor.


Take one of the following courses:

SP-250 Introduction to Hispanic Literature

Emphasizes the development of skill in reading Spanish and in literary analysis of selected stories, plays, poems, and essays from Spain and Latin America. 

3 CreditsH, I, CSPrerequisite: SP210.

SP-255 Contemporary Hispanic Short Fiction

An intensive introduction to reading and analyzing twentieth-century Spanish and Spanish American short narrative. Study of the literary tests enables students to develop a better understanding of and appreciation for Hispanic cultures while continuing to build their Spanish language proficiency. 

3 CreditsH, I, CSPrerequisite: SP210.


Take the following course:

SP-271 Enrichmnt After-School for Youth-Spanish

Through this Local Engagement course, Juniata students will partner with the Huntingdon Area School District to offer language and culture classes to elementary and middle school students. They will design and deliver after-school course content in a dynamic, fun, after-school program designed to introduce students in grades 3-6 to Spanish and the cultures of Spain and Latin America. The course introduces students to best practices in local engagement, our local community, and the opportunities presented by our community partners. During seven weeks of the class, Juniata Students will teach the twice-a-week lessons at the nearby Standing Stone Elementary School. Must have clearances.

3 CreditsSW-LE 


OTHER REQUIREMENTS

Spanish or Spanish American Civilization, Culture, or History:

Take two courses; one of which must be at the 300/400 level:

SP-285 Introduction to Latin America

This course offers students an overview of Latin American cultures through the study of their history, geography, literature, and art from the pre-Columbian period to present. The course is conducted in Spanish.

3 CreditsH, I, CS,SW-GEPrerequisite: SP-210

SP-385 Intro to Latin America

This course focuses on the historical, political, intellectual, artistic, and social aspects of Latin America in order to familiarize students with the main trends in the development of the region. After a review of major historical events, students will explore trends and differences among regions of Latin America. The study focuses on textual readings, but also examines some representative examples of cultural production in the fields of art, literature, music and film.

3 CreditsI, H, CSPrerequisite: SP230 or equivalent. Students should not take this course if they already took SP285.

SP-260 Spanish Civilization

An introduction to the many facets of Spanish civilization: art, music, history, literature, philosophy and everyday life.

3 CreditsH, I, CSPrerequisite: SP210.

SP-265 Contemporary Spain

An intensive introduction to twentieth and twenty- first century Spain. Topics to be studied include: Spain's peaceful transition from dictatorship to democracy, economic development, and social change. Spain's role in the European Union, mass and elite cultural movements and the challenges facing Spain's younger generation. 

3 CreditsH, I, CSPrerequisites: SP210.

SP-365 Contemporary Spain

Note: Meets with SP265. Additional work is assigned.

3 CreditsH, I, CSPrerequisites: SP250 or SP255 or or SP260 or approval of the instructor.

SP-301 Voice for Voiceless-LA Testimonial Narr

The testimonial genre developed in Latin America during the 1960s to give voice to the voiceless and bear witness to the world of the marginalized and oppressed. A representative sample of testimonial narratives will be read to examine topics such as the testimonial pact established with readers, social realities represented, processes of textual production, and narrative forms incorporated. Text will be read in English translation and the class will be conducted in English. 

3 CreditsCA, I, H, WK-HTPrereq: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109. (Previous course title: Latin American Testimonio)

SP-275 Art and Activism in Latin America

Studies art --literature, film, music, plastic arts, etc.--that denounces social injustice and seeks to trigger fundamental reforms in Latin American societies. Known as arte comprometido or committed art in Latin America, selected violence, economic exploitation, racism, and machismo. The course is conducted in Spanish.

3 CreditsI, H, CSPrerequisites: SP210 or by permission of the instructor.


Spanish or Spanish American Literature:

Take two of the following courses:

SP-301 Voice for Voiceless-LA Testimonial Narr

The testimonial genre developed in Latin America during the 1960s to give voice to the voiceless and bear witness to the world of the marginalized and oppressed. A representative sample of testimonial narratives will be read to examine topics such as the testimonial pact established with readers, social realities represented, processes of textual production, and narrative forms incorporated. Text will be read in English translation and the class will be conducted in English. 

3 CreditsCA, I, H, WK-HTPrereq: FYC-101 or EN-110 or EN-109. (Previous course title: Latin American Testimonio)

SP-355 Contemporary Hispanic Short Fiction

Note: Meets with SP255. Additional work is assigned. 

3 CreditsH, I, CSPrerequisites: SP250 or equivalent and study abroad experience or approval of the instructor.

SP-399 Special Topics

Provides courses not covered by the regular offerings. These are developed to meet the needs of students of advanced standing.

1-4 Credits  

SP-375 Art and Activism in Latin America

Studies art --literature, film, music, plastic arts, etc.--that denounces social injustice and seeks to trigger fundamental reforms in Latin American societies. Known as arte comprometido or committed art in Latin America, selected artistic texts treat topics such as political violence, economic exploitation, racism, and machismo. The course is conducted in Spanish.

3 CreditsI, H, CSPrerequisites: SP250 or SP255 or by permission of the instructor.

SP-400 Contemporary Spanish American Novel

Students continue to develop advanced Spanish language and Hispanic cultural proficiency as well as critical thinking skills through the study of contemporary Spanish American novels.

3 CreditsH, I, CW, CSPrerequisite: SP250 or SP255 or permission of the instructor.

SP-401 Gender Fiction in Hispanic Literature

This course, formerly titled Women in Hispanic Fiction, examines gender constructs in works by Latin American and Spanish authors. Among the topics that will be examined are the construction of gender and identity roles, historical spheres of participation for men and women, and the changing definition of such identity markers and roles. The course will focus on a broad historical range of literary works, examining how gender identities are presented in these works through their intersectionality with sexuality, class, race, age, and politics. In addition to the primary texts, students read critical essays on gender and discuss films and podcasts that develop topics parallel to those in the texts. 

3 CreditsI, H, CWPrerequisites: SP-250 or SP-255.(Previous Course Title: Women in Hispanic Fiction)

SP-404 Hispanic Metafiction

Metafiction is fiction that, rather than transparent, is opaque. In the metafictional moment, the reader looks at rather than through the fictional illusion. As Patricia Waugh writes in Metafiction: The Theory and Practice of Self-Conscious Fiction, Metafictional novels tend to be constructed on the principle of a fundamental and sustained opposition: the construction of a fictional illusion (as in traditional realism) and the laying bare of that illusion. In this course, students engage with the theory of metafiction and study examples from Hispanic fiction, which include works by Allende, Borges, Cortazar, Cervantes, and Garcia Marquez.

3 CreditsI, HPrerequsite: SP210 or permission.

SP-405 Cont. Spanish Novel

Students continue to develop advanced Spanish language and Hispanic cultural proficiency as well as critical thinking skills through study of contemporary Spanish novels.

3 CreditsH, I, CS, CWPrerequisites: SP250 or SP255 or approval of the instructor.

SP-420 Generation of 1898

In this course. students analyze selected essays, fiction, drama, and poetry of this key group of writers who accomplish a major renovation of Spanish thought and literary forms during the early decades of the twentieth century.

3 CreditsH, I, CSPrerequisite: SP250 or SP255 or permission of the instructor.


ELECTIVES

Complete an additional 3 elective courses which focus on topics of Spanish Language or Hispanic Cultures at the 300/400 level.


STUDY ABROAD

Complete one year of study abroad in a Spanish speaking country.


EDUCATION CORE

Take the following courses:

ED-110 Foundations of Education

Discusses the historical and contemporary bases of major political, economic, legal, sociological, and psychological issues affecting public school systems. Students review current issues in education and write a personal philosophy statement.

3 CreditsSCorequisite: ED111.

ED-130 Adolescent Development

Examines human physical, cognitive, and social-emotional development from preadolescence through emerging adulthood. Topics include: identity, sexuality, and gender issues; emotional and behavioral challenges of adolescence, the impact of culture, language, and disability on adolescents, and the role of family, schools, and peers on development.

3 CreditsSEnrollment priority in this course is given to Education POEs.

ED-201 Educational Technology

Introduces educational technology and computer systems and their current applications in the classroom. Topics to be covered include office programs, Web 2.0 programs, multimedia programs, course management systems and web-page construction; classroom presentation software; use of assistive technology and software evaluation.

3 CreditsSPrerequisites: ED110 and ED111 or ED101 and ED120 and ED121. ED130 may be taken as an alternate prerequisite for ED120/ED121 only.

ED-240 Introduction to Students With Exceptionalities

Introduces the culture of exceptionalities within the public special education system. Historical, philosophical, educational, and legal perspectives will be presented. Students will learn the categories of exceptionalities, general characteristics of individuals with exceptionalities eligibility criteria, and the referral process for special education services. Professional and community resources, inclusion and other current issues will be discussed.

3 CreditsSPrerequisites: ED110 and ED111 and ED120 and ED121 or ED130.

ED-314 English Language Learners

Focuses on the historical, legal, and cultural issues pertaining to meeting the educational needs of English language learners. Students are be introduced to research based best practices in instruction and assessment strategies for working with English language learners in the general education classroom setting.

1 CreditSPrerequisite: ED120 or ED130.

ED-315 ELL Field Experience

Provide students with 30 hours of field experience and participation in a variety of multi-cultural and multi-lingual environments in order to broadentheir own experiences, prepare to teach English learners, and work with diverse families. Students accumulate required hours throughout their program, but they formally register for course credit during student teaching or their final semester at Juniata College.

1 CreditSPrerequisites: ED314. Graded S (satisfactory) or U(unsatisfactory).

ED-341 Adaptations for Students With Exceptionalities

The purpose of this course is to learn how to develop and manage effective inclusive learning environments for students with disabilities at the secondary level. Content will focus on the knowledge and skills necessary to create an instructional environment that communicates challenging expectations to students while utilizing and modifying research based instructional strategies/resources/technologies. Students will learn the critical components of effective collaboration with parents and professionals. Successful completion of a field experience in an educational setting is also a requirement.

4 CreditsCW, SPrerequisites: ED110, ED111 and ED240.

ED-398 Methods for Foreign Language Education

This course is for students interested in teaching foreign languages or English as a foreign language or second language (ESL). This course provides a thorough introduction to contemporary theories and methods of language pedagogy. Students seeking K-12 certification in foreign languages may take this course instead of ED420 after completing study abroad. It may also be taken by those students who have an interest in teaching English abroad. International students who are here for a semester or a year should also consider taking this course.

4 CreditsS, CSPrerequisites: ED110 and ED111 and ED130 and ED240 and ED341.


ED-419A Secondary Pre-Student Teaching

Secondary PRE-student-teaching practicum (1 credit): This is a required 80-hour minimum practicum in the linked placement where you will be going for student teaching. Students should plan to spend 4 consecutive hours in their placement each week.

1 CreditsSCo-requisite: ED 420. Note: Reliable transportation is REQUIRED.

(OR)

ED-419B Secondary Pre-Student Teaching

Secondary PRE-student-teaching practicum (1 credit): This is a required 80-hour minimum practicum in the linked placement where you will be going for student teaching. Students should plan to spend 4 consecutive hours in their placement each week. 

1 CreditSCo-requisite: ED 420. Note: Reliable transportation is REQUIRED.


ED-450 Student Teaching

Student teaching is the capstone experience for students preparing for certification to teach in their content area(s). Students synthesize and apply knowledge of developmental theory, content, and teaching methodology as they design, implement, and evaluate learning experiences in an intensive internship in the classroom. Corequisite: ED451 and completion of all clearances and requirements. Note: A special fee is assessed. Secondary level student teaching is in the fall semester; PreK-4th, and foreign language education student teaching is in the spring semester. Students must have access to reliable transportation.

14 CreditsS,SW-LE 

(AND)

ED-451 Student Teaching Seminar

In conjunction with student teaching, students attend weekly seminars that are led by the college supervisors. These meetings focus on professional topics and allow students to reflect upon and share their student teaching experience. In addition, students develop interviewing techniques, become familiar with employment seeking strategies, and develop a portfolio that includes but is not limited to a resume, a philosophy of education statement, lesson plans, and documentation of professional experiences.

1 CreditSCorequisite: ED450.


Spanish Requirements
  • One academic year of study abroad in a Spanish speaking country. Exceptions will be permitted only under special circumstances with the approval of the Department of World Languages and Cultures.
  • After returning from their year abroad, students will take a 300 or 400-level course at Juniata offered in Spanish.
  • Prior to the second semester of the student's senior year, she/he will demonstrate advanced-low oral proficiency in Spanish as measured by an Oral Proficiency Interview (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).
  • A minimum of 33 hours in Spanish and Hispanic Cultures beyond the 210 level, including the courses listed below. One course must be designated "CW" (communication). Alternative courses taken at a foreign exchange institution may be substituted for the required courses as long as they are deemed to be comparable to the Juniata offering by the Spanish faculty.

Additional Certification Requirements
  • 2 math courses
  • 1 English literature course
  • 1 year of study abroad in the target language
  • GPA of 3.0 for certification program and student teaching
  • Grade of C or higher in all courses required for certification
  • Satisfactory rating in all practica
  • Passing scores on all required PRAXIS exams

**ED 450 & 451 (Student Teaching and Seminar) may be taken only in the SPRING semester of the senior year. ED 450 requires students’ full-time participation and no other courses may be taken during this semester without the education advisors approval. Students must have reliable transportation.


NOTE: It is imperative that students work closely with their advisors to meet all current certification requirements. All students are required to take six credits of English composition (or equivalent) and literature (or the equivalent) and two college level mathematics courses (or the equivalent) prior to being admitted to a certification program. See Section I of the Education Department Student Handbook for explanation of all certification requirements.


Students must have advisor who is a member of the World Language Department faculty and Dr. Kathleen Jones in the Education Department.


POE Credit Total = 71

Students must complete at least 18 credits at the 300/400-level.  Any course exception must be approved by the advisor and/or department chair.