What to Expect

Spend your summer living and learning by taking hands-on classes at Raystown Lake, Pennsylvania’s largest inland lake. Taught by experienced faculty, course materials emphasize practical skills and field techniques as well as up-to-date foundational information. Wildlife related courses are designed to meet certification requirements from the Wildlife Society.

Reside in a LEED-certified facility featuring modern lakeside housing. Enjoy kayaking, mountain biking, and hiking around Raystown’s 29,000 acres woods, water, and meadows.

Class sizes are kept small, so register now to reserve your space.

Course offerings are tentative and subject to change

May Session

Introductory GIS (3 credits) ESS  May 21 – 25 ESS 330

Denny Johnson – Juniata College

Overview:  This course is an introduction to a Geographical Information System (GIS), and the course objective is that students gain a basic, partial understanding of GIS concepts, technical issues, and applications using Arc View GIS. It encourages thinking in spatial context. A diverse array of hands-on computer applications and projects are used to understand how geographical data can be analyzed spatially. Students explore analysis techniques in a problem basis learning approach using small team projects.

Meeting time – 8:00 am  – 5:00 pm

 

Experiential Ecology (3 credits) May 21 – June 1 BI 399

Chris Grant – Juniata College

Overview: This course is an intensive two-week experience that will gain students real world experience in the ecological and environmental science disciplines, while helping them make connections with both government and private organizations in the environmental field.  This three credit course will be comprised of lectures, reflective essays, exams, and field experiences that will include training with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission, Appalachian Forest Consultants, and Trout Unlimited. 

Meeting time – M-F -9:00 am-1200 pm; Field experience days 9:00- 5:00pm

 

Advanced GIS (4 credits)  May 28 – June 2 ESS 377

Neil Pelkey – Juniata College

Overview: This course explores spatial decision support systems, hot spot modeling for home range, disease and crime, intermediate image analysis, habitat classification from multispectral and hyperspectral imagery. Prerequisites: Previous GIS Class

Meeting Time:

 

June Semester

Mammalogy  (3 credits) June 4-29  BI 323

Uma Ramakrishnan and Doug Glazier - Juniata College

Overview: This course examines the comparative biology of living mammals, including taxonomy, evolution, biogeography, ecology, morphology, physiology and behavior. Special attention is given to conservation issues, the relevance of mammals in modern biological research, and field techniques for studying mammals. Field experience will include radio telemetry and small mammal trapping. This course is suitable for credits in the category of Wildlife Biology for certification from The Wildlife Society. Prerequisites: 1 college level organismal or ecology course or permission of the instructor.

Meeting Time: M-F, 1:00 pm to 5:00 pm with occasional exceptions

 

Ornithology (3 credits) June 4-29  BI 324

Chuck Yohn – Juniata College

Overview: This course provides a comprehensive survey of the comparative biology, ecology, and behavior of birds with a special focus on issues pertaining to conservation management. Daily field activities include field identification of birds by sight and sound.  Students also gain 12 hours of experience mist-netting, banding, aging and sexing of songbirds.  Other field work topics include common management, research and monitoring techniques. This course is suitable for credits in the category of Wildlife Biology for certification from The Wildlife Society.   Prerequisites: 1 college level organismal or ecology course or permission of the instructor.

Meeting Time: M-F, 8:00 am to 12:00 pm with occasional exceptions

 

Turtle Conservation and ecology (3 credits)– BI 399, June 4-15

Roy Nagle - Juniata College

This field based course explores the conservation and reproductive ecology of freshwater and terrestrial turtles of Pennsylvania.  Includes field research methods, population and spatial ecology, the role of research in shaping law and policy, and practical methods of conservation.  Based at the Raystown Field Station with variable schedules that accommodate the activity patterns of native species in their natural habitats.  Students in Turtle Conservation and Ecology learn mark-recapture, radio-telemetry, aging, trapping, and other field techniques through hands-on work with a variety of turtle species.  The course integrates biology, ethics, environmental science, law, and collaborative field work to address challenging questions and problems.  Students engage in rewarding, physically demanding local field work that promotes conservation.  Prerequisites: College level introductory biology or environmental science

 Meeting Time: M-F, eight hours per day (schedule varies)

The course will satisfy upper-level Bio or ESS elective course requirements.

 

Summer Wildlife Semester

 Summer 2018

Dates: June 4- June 29                        Cost TBD*
Food service - $100 per week*             Housing - $125 per week*

*Prices subject to change

Course # Title Faculty Division Skills Credits
BI 324 RFS Ornithology (33497) Yohn, C N   3.00
BI 323 RFS Mammalogy (20935) Glazier, D & Ramakrishnan, U N   3.00

Summer 2019

Course # Title Faculty Division Skills Credits
BI 324 RFS Ornithology (33497) Yohn, C N   3.00
BI 370 RFS Herpetology (20320) Matter, J & Nagle, R N   3.00

Summer 2020

Course # Title Faculty Division Skills Credits
BI 370 RFS Herpetology (20320) Matter, J & Nagle, R N   3.00
BI 323 RFS Mammalogy (20935) Glazier, D & Ramakrishnan, U N   3.00