LINGUISTICS CORE

Take 9 credits from the following courses:

EN-200 History of the Language

Like other languages, English is not monolithic, and it is always on the move. This course examines how English functions now, both in its Standard form and in many of its varieties around the world; how its sounds and structures have changed from its Proto-Indo-European beginnings; and what major factors have influenced those changes.

3 CreditsH, IPrerequisites: FYC101, EN110, or EN109.

EN-300 Modern Theories of Grammar

As grammatical creatures, we use our talents in pattern recognition and handling discrete structures. Along with the individual and interpersonal aspects of language, the course investigates sentence structure as an exercise in constructing a scientific theory based on the formal reasoning inherent in some grammatical theories. A research project relates material to students' interests.

3 CreditsH,CW,WK-FRPrerequisite: EN110, EN109, or FYC 101.

WL-303 Sociolinguistics

This undergraduate course is meant to encourage you to reflect on how language functions in society. We will consider a subset of topics relevant to sociolinguistics, among them dialect variation (e.g., regional, social, ethnic); language ideology and language prejudice; and linguistic debates in education. We will consider linguistic communities across the United States. 

3 CreditsCA, H, IPrerequisite: EN110 or EN109 and Junior or Senior standing.


ELECTIVE COURSES

Take 6 credits from the following courses:

BI-450 Neurobiology

Neurobiology is a lecture course that addresses concepts ranging from the molecular biology of ion channels to signal integration and behavior. This course is experimentally based and will focus on the biophysics, chemistry, and mechanisms of signal production and integration in the nervous system. Particular attention will be paid to sensory systems and memory consolidation. In addition to lecture exams, students will gain valuable experience in scientific writing through the preparation of a review paper on a neurobiological topic of their choosing.

3 CreditsNPrerequisites: BI207 or PY238 or permission.

BI-450CW Neurobiology

Neurobiology (W) is a lecture course that addresses concepts ranging from the molecular biology of ion channels to signal integration and behavior combined with a supplemental series of lectures to develop the students writing skills in Biology. This course is experimentally based and will focus on the biophysics, chemistry, and mechanisms of signal production and integration in the nervous system. Particular attention will be paid to sensory systems and memory consolidation. In addition to lecture exams, students will gain valuable experience in scientific writing through the preparation of a review paper on a neurobiological topic of their choosing. 

4 CreditsN, CWPrerequisites: BI207 or PY238 or permission of the instructor.

CM-130 Introduction to Human Communication

Surveys the fundamental tenets of human communication through application. This course is concerned with how and why we speak, listen, respond, and strategize through the uses of verbal and nonverbal symbol systems.

3 CreditsS 

CM-210 Race and Language in the United States

This class examines racism as a cultural system observed through our beliefs and practices about spoken English. The goal of the course is to develop an understanding of how linguistic prejudice contributes to the cultural programs of racism in the US.

3 CreditsSW-US 

CS-362  Languages and Translation

A systematic approach to the study and analysis of computer programming languages. The procedural, functional, object- oriented and logical language paradigms are examined through the use ofrepresentative languages. Syntax and semantics issues are emphasized through the study of translation techniques in formal labs and group projects. 

4 CreditsNPrerequisites: CS220 and CS240. Must have Junior or Senior standing. 

MA-220 Introduction to Probability & Statistics

An introduction to the basic ideas and techniques of probability theory and to selected topics in statistics, such as sampling theory, confidence intervals, and linear regression.

4 CreditsN, QS, CTGESPrerequisite: MA130

PL-208  Symbolic Logic

An introduction to the basics of first-order logic: the concept of artificial language, techniques for symbolizing ordinary languages and arguments, formal inference systems (either truth- free method or natural deduction), and other advanced topics in first-order logic. It has no prerequisites beyond high school algebra.

3 CreditsN,H,WK-FR 

MA-208 Symbolic Logic

An introduction to the basics of first-order logic: the concept of artificial language, techniques for symbolizing ordinary languages and arguments, formal inference systems (either truth- free method or natural deduction), and other advanced topics in first-order logic. It has no prerequisites beyond high school algebra.

3 CreditsN, H, WK-FR 

PY-270 Cognitive Neuroscience

Focuses on the neural mechanisms of mental processes including sensation and perception, attention, memory, reasoning, and decision making. Topics include basic neuroanatomy, functional imaging techniques, and evidence from neurotypical and clinical populations. 

3 CreditsS, NPrerequisites: PY101.

PY-304 Cognitive Psychology

Explores an array of issues in human memory, primarily from a cognitive/information processing point of view. Major emphasis is on using research data to formulate answers to both theoretical and applied questions. 

3 CreditsSPrerequisite: PY101.

SP-245 Spanish Phonetics & Phonology

This course serves as an introduction to the phonetics and phonology of Spanish. The goals of the course include providing students with a theoretical and practical understanding of the system of Spanish sounds, including dialectal variations, as well as strengthening students' Spanish speech in the direction of more native like pronunciation.

3 CreditsH, I, CSPrerequisite: SP210.

SP-345 Spanish Phonetics & Phonology

This course serves as an introduction to the phonetics and phonology of Spanish. The goals of the course include providing students with a theoretical and practical understanding of the system of Spanish sounds, including dialectal variations, as well as strengthening students' Spanish speech in the direction of more native like pronunciation.

3 CreditsH, I, CSPrerequisite: Study abroad experience or permission of the instructor.

CS-110  Computer Science I

An introductory study of computer science software development concepts. Python is used to introduce a disciplined approach to problem solving methods, algorithm development, software design, coding, debugging, testing, and documentation in the object oriented paradigm. This is the first course in the study of computer science. 

3 CreditsN,CTGES,CTGISRecommended programming experience or IT110 or IT100, IT111 or IM110 or MA103 but not necessary. 

CS-255P  Perl Programming

The students will prepare a portfolio of computer programs written in the Perl language. The programs are reviewed, critiqued, and then the student has an opportunity to revise them as needed for final inclusion in the portfolio. 

2 CreditsN,CTGESPrerequisites: CS110 and Sophomore standing and permission. 

ED-312 Language and the Brain

Provides an overview of research-based models of language acquisition, both typical and atypical in children. Topics include theories of language acquisition, neurological bases of speech and language, cognitive, perceptual and motor bases of early language and speech,social and communicative bases of early language and speech, language learning and teaching, relationship of language to literacy acquisition, language differences in diverse learners.

3 CreditsSPrerequisites: ED120, ED121.

ED-313 Language and Brain Lab

Extends and enhances learning in ED312 Language and the Developing Brain. Through participation in classroom settings, students will be able to observe and interact with young children in Kindergarten through Grade 2 and public education professionals, apply knowledge and understanding of language development and theory, analyze and assess language development using formal and informal assessment tools, monitor student performance, and adapt instruction and interactions to meet individual needs, scaffold learning, and guide behavior.

1 CreditSPrerequisites: ED120 and ED121. Corequisite: ED312.


LANGUAGE COURSES

Take 3 credits from the following courses:

CN-210 Chinese III

Chinese 210 is the third part of a four-semester introductory sequence. This course is designed to further develop listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in Chinese. It will continue to train students in pronunciation and tone accuracy, to help them review and strengthen the basic syntax and grammar, build a working vocabulary around various daily situations, and further enhance their understanding of Chinese life and culture.

3 CreditsH, I, CW, SWGLSPre-req: CN110 and 120, or placement test results.

FR-210  French III

This is the third course in a the three-semester sequence of beginning and intermediate French. Students will learn and practice more advanced grammatical structures and vocabulary to communicate more spontaneously and fluently with other speakers of French. 

3 CreditsH,I,CS,SWGLSPRE-REQ: French 120 or equivalent. 

GR-210 German III

German III is the third part of the four-semester introductory sequence. Its primary goals are to enable students to continue building their proficiency and attain a broader understanding of German culture. Emphasis is placed on the use of the target language in the classroom and the study of culturally authentic materials. Students will achieve greater accuracy with basic language structures. 

3 CreditsH, I, CS, SWGLSPre-req: GR120, placement test, or program head's permission. This course is part of the Global Engagement element of the General Education Curriculum, " 3. Language Study " : Complete at least a 200-level world language course in the target language if continuing previous language study.

RU-210  Intermediate Russian

The third course in the Russian-language sequence. Students further develop oral and written proficiency in Russian while learning about Russian life and culture. 

3 CreditsH,I,CS,SWGLSPrerequisite: RU120.

SP-210 Spanish III

Spanish 210 is the third part of a three-semester introductory sequence. Its primary goals are to enable students to build their proficiency and attain a broader understanding of Hispanic cultures. Emphasis is on the use of the target language and the study of culturally authentic materials. Students will achieve greater accuracy with basic language structures. 

3 CreditsH, I, CS, SWGLSPre-req: SP-120 or placement results.

SP-235 Intensive Spanish Grammar

This course serves to reinforce the fundamental grammar that students have studied previously and to delve more deeply into certain topics that often prove to be challenging for native English speakers of Spanish. Topics typically of this course include; identifying the building blocks of sentences; identifying verb classes and studying how that information determines the way we construct sentences; analyzing the Spanish pronominal system including, subject and object clitic pronouns; reviewing and expanding upon the use of subordinate clauses introduced in SP210. 

3 CreditsH, IPrerequisites: SP210.

SP-430 Advanced Spanish Grammar

This course serves to help advanced students gain a better understanding of the meaning of certain grammatical constructions in Spanish by systematically observing and analyzing their use in a variety of communicative contexts.

3 CreditsH, I, CSPrerequisite: SP235.


Secondary Emphasis Credit Total = 18

Six credits must be at the 300/400-level.  Any course exception must be approved by the advisor and/or department chair.